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The Relationship Between Affective, Calculative and Normative Commitment
Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Social Sciences. (Center för strategiska nätverk)ORCID iD: 0000-0001-9441-2919
2009 (English)In: Measures and Measurement, Process and Practice: The Fourth Meeting of IMP Group in Asia / [ed] Batt, Peter J., 2009Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Commitment is a psychological state regarded in the literature of marketing as a key concept in business relationships (Fullerton 2005; Morgan and Hunt 1994)). The dominant attitude in the literature is that commitment consists of affective, calculative and normative components  (Meyer and Allen 1991); O´Reilly and Chatman 1986; Bansal et al 2004; Fullerton 2005;  Gilliland and Bello 2002; Gruen et al. 2000; Harrison-Walker 2001). A single network actor may have elements of all the components at the time of a single commitment. It is therefore not meaningful to regard them as separate forms rather than as components. For example, someone who is committed may have both a calculated (business-related) and an emotional commitment to retain a relationship, but at the same time not feel particularly morally bound by this. And another committed person may be less committed in business terms but all the more committed emotionally and morally. Looking at commitment in this way also means that different variations of commitment influence the relationships in question in different ways.

 

Research in recent years has focused on what factors lead to and reinforce commitment, but knowledge on the relation between the three components is lacking. Further studies in the area in general and of how the three components interact in particular are required in order to gain greater understanding of how commitment works in relationships and networks. The purpose of this paper is to develop a conceptual model that describes how the three components interact. The conceptual model is illustrated by an empirical case. Data have been gathered through qualitative interviews and a survey that has been analysed quantitatively.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2009.
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-10899OAI: oai:DiVA.org:miun-10899DiVA, id: diva2:284686
Conference
IMP Asia, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, December 6-9
Projects
Center for Strategic network development for the improvement of regional competitivenessAvailable from: 2010-01-08 Created: 2010-01-08 Last updated: 2010-01-08Bibliographically approved

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Roxenhall, Tommy

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

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Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
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  • de-DE
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Output format
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