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Recovery from high-intensity training sessions in female soccer players
Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences. (Swedish Winter Sports Research Centre)
St. Ambrose University, Department of Kinesiology, Davenport, IA 52803, U.S.A. .
University of Alabama, Department of Kinesiology, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487, U.S.A..
University of Alabama, Department of Kinesiology, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487, U.S.A..
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2011 (English)In: Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, ISSN 1064-8011, E-ISSN 1533-4287, Vol. 25, no 6, p. 1726-1735Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study quantified the performance recovery time requirements after training sessions using high-intensity soccer drills with and without the ball in National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I female soccer players. Recovery time periods (24, 48, 72 hours of rest) from high-intensity soccer training sessions using drills with and without the ball were evaluated. Markers of recovery were each individual's performance relative to baseline performance in countermovement jump (CMJ) height, 5 bound jumps for distance (5BT), 20-m sprint (20SP), session rating of perceived effort (S-RPE), and heart rate (HR). Repeated-measures analysis of variance revealed a significant difference in CMJ performance (p < 0.04) and S-RPE (p < 0.02) after 24 hours of rest but not at 48 or 72 hours compared to baseline. There were no significant differences in 20SP, 5BT, or HR after 24, 48, or 72-hour recovery (p > 0.05). Therefore, high-intensity training drills produced a sufficient conditioning stimulus with little chance of underrecovery for the performance measures we tested. Countermovement jump and S-RPE may be more sensitive performance recovery indicators.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2011. Vol. 25, no 6, p. 1726-1735
Keywords [en]
Borg CR-10 scale, high-intensity, interval training, power, small sided games
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-10878DOI: 10.1519/JSC.0b013e3181e06de8ISI: 000290792600036Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-79960107318OAI: oai:DiVA.org:miun-10878DiVA, id: diva2:284353
Projects
Integrative Physiologi & BiomechanicsApplied Training Theory in SportsAvailable from: 2010-01-06 Created: 2010-01-06 Last updated: 2017-12-12Bibliographically approved

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Sjökvist, JesperHolmberg, Hans-Christer

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