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The competitive XC skier - from an integrative perspective.
Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences. (Swedish Winter Sports Research Centre)ORCID iD: 0000-0002-3814-6246
2009 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Cross-country skiing (XC) is a demanding endurance sport. The skiers compete on hilly tracks with a combination of steep uphill, flatter terrain and technically demanding downhills. This imposes physiological as well as coordinative challenges due to the frequent transitions between, and the use of, different skiing techniques. During the last decade there has been an increased scientific emphasis on upper body development (1) and biomechanical modifications to different skiing techniques (2-4). The greater emphasis on upper body training has markedly improved skiers’ endurance and muscle strength in the arm and torso region. Furthermore, the innovative technical development of specific techniques has contributed to higher racing velocities (3, 4) and a better use of energy (2). Although there has been considerable progress in overall XC performance during the last years, the new demands of the sprint and mass-start events imply further improvements. One potential area for development is increasing the understanding of the XC race and its components. Recent development of more advanced methodology in the lab and the integrative use of physiological and biomechanical methodologies have contributed to better and more circumstantial analysis of several determining aspects of the sport. Areas that would be interesting to explore more specifically in the field are the velocity profile, technique transitions and the dynamics of different physiological, as well as biomechanical, variables in races using different ski techniques and of varying duration. This has the potential to improve our understanding of the demands of the sport, but also the importance of recovery during continuous intermittent exercise, as well as the development of fatigue. A closer cooperation between sports science and the rapidly growing research field of sports/performance technology has the potential to provide new possibilities and perspectives. A key factor in athletes’ success will always be improving their physiological capacities, but also the more effective use of biomechanical knowledge to optimise technical performance, assisted by better equipment, for example. In this context the use of an integrative biomechanical and physiological approach is an important tool towards greater understanding and enabling further improvements to XC performance.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cologne: Sportools , 2009.
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-10825OAI: oai:DiVA.org:miun-10825DiVA, id: diva2:283985
Conference
14th Annual Congress of the European College of Sports Science
Available from: 2010-01-03 Created: 2010-01-03 Last updated: 2010-01-12Bibliographically approved

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http://www.ecss-congress.eu/OSLO2009/images/stories/Documents/BOAOSLO0610bContent.pdf

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Holmberg, Hans-Christer

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

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Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
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More languages
Output format
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  • asciidoc
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