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Diving response and apneic time in humans.
Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
1998 (English)In: Undersea & Hyperbaric Medicine, ISSN 1066-2936, Vol. 25, no 1, 13-19 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of this study was to compare apneic time with the human diving response, defined as heart rate (HR) reduction and reduced skin blood flow, in groups with varying degrees of breath-hold diving experience. Apneic time and HR reduction at apneas in air and apneas with face immersion in cold water were thus recorded in nine groups. Skin capillary blood flow was recorded in six of the groups. All subjects received the same information on maximizing apneic duration, and no information about their progress during the apneas. The longest apneas and the most pronounced cardiovascular adjustments were found in the young, trained divers. It was found that apneic time was significantly correlated to HR reduction among the nine groups (r = 0.94, P < 0.001), and to skin capillary blood flow reduction among the six groups where the parameter was measured (r = 0.82, P < 0.05). The correlation between HR reduction and skin capillary blood flow reduction was also significant (r = 0.85, P < 0.05). When the difference in HR reduction and apneic time between apneas in air and apneas with face immersion were compared in the nine groups, it was found that all groups reacted with a more pronounced HR reduction during apneas with face immersion. All groups without prior breath-hold diving experience were found to perform shorter apneas with face immersion than apneas in air, or apneas of the same duration in both conditions, which has been reported in other studies. However, in all groups with diving experience, the apneic time was prolonged during apneas with face immersion. The results of this study suggest an oxygen-conserving effect of the diving response in trained apneic divers

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
1998. Vol. 25, no 1, 13-19 p.
Keyword [en]
Diving, response
National Category
Microbiology Sport and Fitness Sciences Physiology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-2406Local ID: 1605OAI: oai:DiVA.org:miun-2406DiVA: diva2:27438
Available from: 2008-09-30 Created: 2008-09-30 Last updated: 2011-01-10Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
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Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
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  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
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  • Other locale
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Output format
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