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Process-based ecological river restoration: Visualizing three-dimensional connectivity and dynamic vectors to recover lost linkages
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2006 (English)In: Ecology & society, ISSN 1708-3087, E-ISSN 1708-3087, Vol. 11, no 2, 1-16 p., 5Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Human impacts to aquatic ecosystems often involve changes in hydrologic connectivity and flow regime. Drawing upon examples in the literature and from our experience, we developed conceptual models and used simple bivariate plots to visualize human impacts and restoration efforts in terms of connectivity and flow dynamics. Human-induced changes in longitudinal, lateral, and vertical connectivity are often accompanied by changes in flow dynamics, but in our experience restoration efforts to date have more often restored connectivity than flow dynamics. Restoration actions have included removing dams to restore fish passage, reconnecting flow through artificially cut-off side channels, setting back or breaching levees, and removing fine sediment deposits that block vertical exchange with the bed, thereby partially restoring hydrologic connectivity, i.e., longitudinal, lateral, or vertical. Restorations have less commonly affected flow dynamics, presumably because of the social and economic importance of water diversions or flood control. Thus, as illustrated in these bivariate plots, the trajectories of ecological restoration are rarely parallel with degradation trajectories because restoration is politically and economically easier along some axes more than others.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2006. Vol. 11, no 2, 1-16 p., 5
Keyword [en]
connectivity, flow dynamics, hyporheic zone, river restoration.
National Category
Biological Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-1603Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-33846052287Local ID: 4876OAI: oai:DiVA.org:miun-1603DiVA: diva2:26635
Available from: 2008-09-30 Created: 2008-09-30 Last updated: 2016-10-11Bibliographically approved

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Scopushttp://www.ecologyandsociety.org/vol11/iss2/art5/

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Bång, Åsa
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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf