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Are there differences in birth weight between neighbourhoods in a Nordic welfare state: a 10 year cohort study
Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
Responsible organisation
2007 (English)In: BMC Public Health, ISSN 1471-2458, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 7, 267- p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background. The objective of this cohort study was to examine the effect on birth weight of living in a disadvantaged neighbourhood in a Nordic welfare state. Birth weight is a health indicator known to be sensitive to political and welfare state conditions. No former studies on urban neighbourhood differences regarding mean birth weight have been carried out in a Nordic country. Methods. A register based on individual data on children�s birth weight and maternal risk factors was used. Neighbourhood characteristics, i.e. aggregated measures on ethnicity and income, were also included. Connections between individual- and neighbourhood-level determinants and the outcome were analysed using multi-level regression technique. The study covered six hundred and ninety-six neighbourhoods in the three major cities of Sweden, Stockholm, Göteborg and Malmö, during 1992-2001. The majority of neighbourhoods had a population of 4 000�10 000 inhabitants. An average of 500 births per neighbourhood were analysed in this study. Results. Living in a deprived neighbourhood in Sweden did not add to the more proximal risk of giving birth to lower weight infants connected to individual socioeconomic status. Infants born in homogenous ethnic neighbourhoods weighed 69 g less than did infants born in homogeneous Swedish neighbourhoods. No independent effect of neighbourhood income was observed. ICC was less than 1 per cent indicating that most variability in birth weight was on the individual level. Conclusions. Social policies in Sweden, including universal social benefits, gender equality seen in high female labour market participation, and a general and free maternal health care, could possibly explain the non-existent differences in mean birth weight in Swedish urban neighbourhoods.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2007. Vol. 7, 267- p.
Keyword [en]
birth weight, context, neighbourhood, welfare state
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-1314DOI: 10.1186/1471-2458-7-267ISI: 000251454300001Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-36649031231Local ID: 4341OAI: oai:DiVA.org:miun-1314DiVA: diva2:26346
Note

VR-Neuroscience

Available from: 2008-09-30 Created: 2009-11-02 Last updated: 2016-10-11Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
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  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
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  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
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