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Learning at work: competence development or competence-stress
Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Social Sciences.
2005 (English)In: Applied Ergonomics, ISSN 0003-6870, E-ISSN 1872-9126, Vol. 36, no 2, 135-144 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Changes in work and the ways in which it is carried out bring a need for upgrading workplace knowledge, skills and competencies. In todays workplaces, and for a number of reasons, workloads are higher than ever and stress is a growing concern (Clarke and Cooper, 2000; Stanton et al, 2001). Increased demand for learning brings a risk that this will be an additional stress factor and thus a risk to health. Our research study is based on the control-demand-support model of Karasek & Theorell (1990). We have used this model for our own empirical research with the aim to evaluate the model in the modern workplace. Our research enables us to expand the model in the light of current workplace conditions � especially those relating to learning. We report empirical data from a questionnaire survey of working conditions in two different branches of industry. We are able to define differences between companies in terms of working conditions and competence development. We describe and discuss the affects these conditions have on workplace competence development. Our research results show that increased workers� control of the learning process makes competence development more stimulating, is likely to simplify the work and reduces (learning-related) stress. It is therefore important that learning at work allows employees� to control their learning and also allows time for the process of learning and reflection.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2005. Vol. 36, no 2, 135-144 p.
Keyword [en]
Demand-Control Model, Workplace Learning, Stress, Competences, Control
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-931DOI: 10.1016/j.apergo.2004.09.008ISI: 000227108600003Local ID: 2456OAI: oai:DiVA.org:miun-931DiVA: diva2:25963
Conference
Workshop on Contemporary Perspectives on Learning for Work, 2000, Östersund, Sweden
Note
Workshop on Contemporary Perspectives on Learning for Work, Östersund, SwedenAvailable from: 2008-09-30 Created: 2008-09-30 Last updated: 2012-02-12Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf