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Gender Difference in Role-Play: Male and Female Character Language in World of Warcraft
Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Humanities.
2009 (English)Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
Abstract [en]

In this essay, I have investigated whether players of World of Warcraft change their language to suit the gender of the character they play. I have researched if there are gender differences that correspond to what is defined as male and female language in mixed-sex conversations. Chat-logs, collected during four participant observations, were used for making an analysis based primarily on research by Coates (1993) and Yale (2007). Seven features were selected for analysis: amount of participation, hedges, questions, directives and commands, taboo language, compliments and grammar. It was possible to discover gender differences, but these were not consistent in all areas of research. For example, female characters had a higher contribution than males, as well as a higher use of hedges and tag-questions among males, which contradicts previous research. The lack of consistency might be due to the fact that the participants do not specifically consider all areas as typically female or male, or their unawareness of these tendencies. We also need to consider disagreement in previous gender studies as well as folklinguistic belief. The explanation of the lack of consistent differences may be a more equal relationship between males and females in this context, or due to thepossibility that the participants, who are usually male, make use of their normal male language.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2009. , p. 34
Keywords [en]
World of Warcraft, gender, gender differences, chat-logs, mixed-sex conversations, folklinguistic belief, amount of participation, hedges, questions, directives, commands, taboo language, compliments, grammar.
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URN: urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-8531OAI: oai:DiVA.org:miun-8531DiVA, id: diva2:158742
Presentation
(English)
Uppsok
humaniora/teologi
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Available from: 2009-03-30 Created: 2009-02-03 Last updated: 2018-01-13Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf