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Spleen Volume and Contraction During Apnea in Mt. Everest Climbers and Everest Base Camp Trekkers
Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences. (Swedish Winter Sports Research Centre)
Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
Nepalese Army Institute of Health Sciences, Kathmandu, Nepal.
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2020 (English)In: High Altitude Medicine & Biology, ISSN 1527-0297, E-ISSN 1557-8682, Vol. 21, no 1, p. 84-91Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The human spleen can contract and transiently boost the blood with stored erythrocytes. We measured spleen volume and contraction during apneas in two groups, each containing 12 Caucasian participants (each 3 women): one group planning to summit Mt. Everest (8848 m; "Climbers") and another trekking to Everest Base Camp (5300 m; "Trekkers"). Tests were done in Kathmandu (1370 m) 1-3 days after arrival, before the Climb/Trek. Age, height, weight, vital capacity, resting heart rate, and arterial oxygen saturation were similar between groups (not significant). After 15 minutes of sitting rest, all participants performed a 1-minute apnea and, after 2 minutes of rest, 1 maximal duration apnea was performed. Six of the climbers did a third apnea and hemoglobin concentration (Hb) was measured. Three axial spleen diameters were measured by ultrasonic imaging before and after the apneas for spleen volume calculation. Mean (standard deviation) baseline spleen volume was larger in Climbers [367 (181) mL] than in Trekkers [228 (70) mL; p = 0.022]. Spleen contraction occurred during apneas in both groups, with about twice the magnitude in Climbers. Three apneas in six of the Climbers resulted in a spleen volume reduction from 348 (145) to 202 (91) mL (p = 0.005) and an Hb elevation from 147.9 (13.1) to 153.3 (11.3) g/L (p = 0.024). Maximal apneic duration was longer in Climbers [88 (23) seconds vs. 67 (18) seconds in Trekkers; p = 0.023]. We concluded that a large spleen characterizes Climbers, suggesting that spleen function may be important for high-altitude climbing performance.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2020. Vol. 21, no 1, p. 84-91
Keywords [en]
apneic diving, breath-hold, high altitude, hypoxia tolerance, performance, prediction
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-38767DOI: 10.1089/ham.2019.0028ISI: 000524896900010Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85082003152OAI: oai:DiVA.org:miun-38767DiVA, id: diva2:1420954
Available from: 2020-04-01 Created: 2020-04-01 Last updated: 2020-04-23Bibliographically approved

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Schagatay, ErikaHolmström, PontusMulder, EricSchagatay, Fanny SagaLodin-Sundström, Angelica

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Schagatay, ErikaHolmström, PontusMulder, EricSchagatay, Fanny SagaLodin-Sundström, Angelica
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