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Do Community Structural Characteristics Moderate the Association Between Mental Health and the Frequency and Severity of Violent-Behavioral Outcomes in Community Respondents?
Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC, Canada.
Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Humanities and Social Sciences. Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC, Canada.
Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC, Canada.
Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC, Canada.
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2019 (English)In: Journal of Interpersonal Violence, ISSN 0886-2605, E-ISSN 1552-6518Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

In this prospective study, we examined the association between three types of mental health symptom clusters (i.e., psychotic, internalizing, and externalizing) and the frequency and severity of violent-behavioral outcomes, and whether community disadvantage, residential instability, and criminogenic facility density moderated these associations. Study data were derived from 258 community-dwelling adults nested in 60 postal forward sortation areas (FSAs) in a large metropolitan area in Western Canada who were assessed twice over a 6-month period. In addition, census and administrative data were obtained on the same areas. Controlling for sociodemographic characteristics (i.e., age, gender, ethnicity, relationship status, and employment status), lifetime history of violent-behavioral outcomes, and community structural characteristics, internalizing and externalizing mental health symptoms were significantly positively associated with the frequency and severity of subsequent violence perpetration and with the severity of subsequent violent victimization. Several significant interactions were observed: internalizing symptoms increased the risk of frequent and severe violence perpetration in FSAs with high but not low disadvantage, and externalizing symptoms increased the risk of frequent violent victimization in FSAs with a high but not low criminogenic facility density. Only the interactive association of internalizing symptoms and community disadvantage with the severity of violence perpetration, however, remained significant after Bonferroni correction was applied. These findings provide tentative support that associations between mental health and violent-behavioral outcomes can vary with community context. The implication of these findings for assessing and managing violent-behavioral outcomes in the community is discussed. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2019.
Keywords [en]
crime pattern theory, mental disorder, social disorganization theory, violence perpetration, violent victimization
National Category
Health Sciences
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URN: urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-38241DOI: 10.1177/0886260519888204ISI: 000500136100001PubMedID: 31789077Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85077382828OAI: oai:DiVA.org:miun-38241DiVA, id: diva2:1385820
Available from: 2020-01-15 Created: 2020-01-15 Last updated: 2020-02-21Bibliographically approved

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Douglas, Kevin S.

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