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Enclaves in tourism: producing and governing exclusive spaces for tourism
University of Oulu, Finland.
Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Economics, Geography, Law and Tourism. (Etour och kulturgeografi)ORCID iD: 0000-0002-8682-0442
2019 (English)In: Tourism Geographies, ISSN 1461-6688, E-ISSN 1470-1340, Vol. 21, no 5, p. 739-748Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Exclusively planned tourism destinations, such as all-inclusive resorts, gated resort communities, private cruise liner-owned islands and privatized beaches, have increased over the last few decades. Researchers have analyzed these kinds of tourism environments as enclaves, which are typically driven by external forces and actors, strongly supported by globalization and the current neoliberal market economy. Existing research shows that tourism enclaves are characterized by active border-making, power issues and material and/or symbolic separation from the surrounding socio-cultural realities, leading to weak linkages with host communities and the local economy. Tourism enclaves involve power inequalities, injustices and unsustainable practices that often have serious negative impacts on local socio-economic development. The articles of the special issue focus on tourism enclaves in different theoretical and geographical contexts and they contribute to our understanding of how these exclusive spaces are created and transformed and how they shape places and place identities. The individual research articles are contextualized and discussed with the key theoretical perspectives and empirical findings on tourism enclaves. Future research needs include analysis of linkages and flows of labor, goods, ideas and capital in different scales; policymaking, planning and regulations; environmental impacts; and locals’ land and resource access in the respect of bordering, privatization and land grabbing. By focusing on these topics, the tourism industry could be guided towards more responsible and sustainable development path.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2019. Vol. 21, no 5, p. 739-748
Keywords [en]
enclaves, enclosure, border-making, homogenization, socio-spatial consequences, territorialization, tourism politics
National Category
Social and Economic Geography
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-37637DOI: 10.1080/14616688.2019.1668051Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85074277219OAI: oai:DiVA.org:miun-37637DiVA, id: diva2:1368317
Available from: 2019-11-06 Created: 2019-11-06 Last updated: 2019-11-15Bibliographically approved

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Wall-Reinius, Sandra

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