miun.sePublications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Completing studies in alternative ways in adult education. ‘Who has told me that I cannot ...?’
Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Education.
Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Education.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-9182-6403
2019 (English)In: International Journal of Learning, Teaching and Educational Research, ISSN 1694-2493, E-ISSN 1694-2116, Vol. 18, no 7, p. 165-183Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Every fourth young adult in Sweden leaves upper secondary school without complete grades (Statistiska Centralbyrån, 2017). These young adults without a diploma are at risk of being marginalized (Hugo, 2007; Lundahl et al. 2015). Therefore, all attempts to support these students’ needs using alternative methods to help them complete their studies are of great importance for both society and the individuals. With this study, we aim to shed light on how participants with different functional variations and overall unfavourable school experiences in a project-based alternative study program in upper secondary education perceive the factors of success. Moreover, we want to understand the project’s outcome based on contextual factors. To do this, we use an abductive content analysis of project documents, field notes, and interviews with five students. Our analysis follows three steps. Firstly, we identify three major themes expressed by the participants as success factors concerning ways to attend and complete their secondary education. Secondly, we identify how contextual factors can explain the project’s outcome. Finally, we draw conclusions on how motivation theory, motivation strategies, and factors in the learning environment can explain the project’s outcome. The overall conclusions are (a) students in this target group need to participate in negotiations concerning their adaptation in their studies, (b) a symmetrical interpersonal relationship between teachers and students is a necessity, and (c) beneficial learning environments are essential for these students’ learning. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2019. Vol. 18, no 7, p. 165-183
Keywords [en]
Adult learning, Alternative pedagogy, Content analysis, Functional variations, Study motivation
National Category
Educational Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-37012DOI: 10.26803/ijlter.18.7.11Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85070916179OAI: oai:DiVA.org:miun-37012DiVA, id: diva2:1347855
Available from: 2019-09-02 Created: 2019-09-02 Last updated: 2019-09-02Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full textScopus

Authority records BETA

Randevåg, LenaBoström, Lena

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Randevåg, LenaBoström, Lena
By organisation
Department of Education
In the same journal
International Journal of Learning, Teaching and Educational Research
Educational Sciences

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 17 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf