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Governing (through) anticipation, vigilance, affect
Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Humanities and Social Sciences. (RCR)ORCID iD: 0000-0003-4011-8954
2019 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The perceived increase in and transformation of societal insecurities necessitates novelapproaches for governing societal responses to future disruption (e.g. O’Malley, 2008). Onesuch novel approach is the establishing of public disaster simulation centres to ensure avigilant and prepared population. Societal insecurities do not necessarily mean transboundaryor de-localized modern risks (in Beck’s, 2009, sense), but may just as well implythreats to geographically delimited communities, societies, and regions, for example natureinduced(yet social) disasters like earthquakes and tsunamis, and insecurities originating fromextreme weather conditions due to climate change (e.g. hurricanes, heatwaves, landslides,flooding). This paper presents a case of public simulation centres understood as amanifestation of the Foucauldian notion of self-technology, emphasizing, as it does, themodification of individual conduct: not only skills but also attitudes must be aligned towardsthe overarching goal of preparedness (Foucault, 1988:18). In other words, is the proliferationof public simulation centres to be understood as a concrete sign of ongoing processes ofresponsibilization? Alternatively, is it an expression of political and economic prestige: thefact that governments choose to spend huge resources on public preparedness? Based on adiverse assemblage of empirical sources (including individual’s accounts of their simulationexperiences, notes from sensuous ethnographic field work, governmental rationalizing of theneed for public simulation centres, and sketches of a giant simulation centre that was nevermaterialized), the paper puts forward an analysis of the mechanisms and technologies bywhich individuals and communities become “resilient”. One overall tentative conclusion isthat the sensuous-affective experiences conveyed by the simulation (like excitement, thrill,discomfort, stress) are intended to have an empowering effect on the participants.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2019.
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-36767OAI: oai:DiVA.org:miun-36767DiVA, id: diva2:1340192
Conference
The 4th Northern European Conference on Emergency and Disaster Studies, NEEDS 2019, Uppsala, June 10-12, 2019
Available from: 2019-08-02 Created: 2019-08-02 Last updated: 2019-08-13Bibliographically approved

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Linnell, Mikael

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf