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Peak oxygen uptake using a training device for combined resistance and aerobic exercise in space and on earth
Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences. (Nationellt Vintersportcentrum/Swedish Winter Sports Research Centre)
Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences. (Nationellt Vintersportcentrum/Swedish Winter Sports Research Centre)
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2008 (English)In: 13th Annual Congress of the European College of Sports Science, Cologne: Sportools , 2008, 523- p.Conference paper, (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Astronauts traveling in Orbit are mandated to perform both aerobic and resistance exercise to combat cardiovascular and muscular deconditioning. A non-gravity dependent flywheel resistance exercise device (FWD), proven to be effective in blunting muscle atrophy when used by bedridden subjects, has been configured to allow for aerobic exercise as well. The current study aimed at determining aerobic energy yield and related physiological demands during exercise using this novel apparatus. Methods: Eight men and women (23±3 yrs, 65±5 kg, 170±6 cm) performed all-out, indoor, stationary rowing exercise randomly on either a commercially available Concept II ergometer (CII) or the FWD. Using a magnetic brake system, the FWD and similar to the CII, produced mainly concentric resistance exercise with the aid of the inherent inertia of rotating flywheels. Progressive exercise protocols (increased frequency and magnetic force) assessed peak oxygen uptake and heart rate, rate of perceived exertion and post lactate concentration. Results Peak oxygen uptake averaged 3.18±0.50 and 3.11±0.49 l/min, respectively during exercise using CII and FWD. Peak oxygen uptake, plasma lactate concentration, heart rate and rate of perceived exertion were not different (p>0.05) across exercise using these two devices. However, time to exhaustion was somewhat (p<0.05) longer for the FWD. Conclusion: Collectively the current results suggest that the novel method of offering an aerobic exercise stimulus is as effective as the most established technology for indoor rowing used by crew. Given that the space agencies have recognized the need for effective exercise countermeasures hardware that has a feasible mass and envelope and features allowing for multiple purposes (e.g., concentric/eccentric resistance and aerobic exercise) in a single piece of apparatus, the current technology should be considered for use in space.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cologne: Sportools , 2008. 523- p.
Keyword [en]
space, test
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-7877ISBN: 978-972-735-156-5 (print)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:miun-7877DiVA: diva2:132747
Projects
Innovative Biomechanical Performance Technology
Available from: 2008-12-30 Created: 2008-12-30 Last updated: 2011-04-21Bibliographically approved

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Tesch, PerAinegren, MatsSwarén, MikaelHolmberg, Hans-Christer
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Citation style
  • apa
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