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Political Journalism
Göteborgs Universitet. (Demokratiinstitutet Demicom)ORCID iD: 0000-0001-5964-102X
Göteborgs Universitet.
2018 (English)In: Oxford Research Encyclopedia of Communication, Oxford University Press, 2018, p. 1-27Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Political journalism constitutes one of the most prominent domains of journalism, and is essential for the functioning of democracy. Ideally, political journalism should function as an information provider, watchdog, and forum for political discussions, thereby helping citizens understand political matters and help prevent abuses of power. The extent to which it does is, however, debated. Apart from normative ideals, political journalism is shaped by factors at several levels of analysis, including the system level, the media organizational level, and the individual level. Not least important for political journalism is the close, interdependent, and contentious relationship with political actors, shaping both the processes and the content of political journalism.

In terms of content, four key concepts in research on political journalism in Western democratic systems are the framing of politics as a strategic game, interpretive versus straight news, conflict framing and media negativity, and political or partisan bias. A review of research related to these four concepts suggests that political journalism has a strong tendency to frame politics as a strategic game rather than as issues, particularly during election campaigns; that interpretive journalism has become more common; that political journalism has a penchant for conflict framing and media negativity; and that there is only limited evidence that political journalism is influenced by political or partisan bias. Significantly more important than political or partisan bias are different structural and situational biases. In all these and other respects, there are important differences across countries and media systems, which follows from the notion that political journalism is always influenced by the media systems in which it is produced and consumed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press, 2018. p. 1-27
Keywords [en]
political journalism, normative perspectives, factors shaping political news, strategic game framing, interpretive journalism, conflict framing, media negativity, media bias, journalism studies
National Category
Media and Communications
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-35973DOI: 10.1093/acrefore/9780190228613.013.859OAI: oai:DiVA.org:miun-35973DiVA, id: diva2:1303273
Available from: 2019-04-09 Created: 2019-04-09 Last updated: 2019-05-02Bibliographically approved

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Strömbäck, Jesper

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

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Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
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Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf