miun.sePublications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Effects of work ability and health promoting interventions for women with musculoskeletal symptoms: A 9-month prospective study
Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
2008 (English)In: BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, ISSN 1471-2474, E-ISSN 1471-2474, Vol. 9, 105- p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Women working in the public human service sector in 'overstrained' situations run the risk of musculoskeletal symptoms and long-term sick leave. In order to maintain the level of health and work ability and strengthen the potential resources for health, it is important that employees gain greater control over decisions and actions affecting their health - a process associated with the concept of self-efficacy. The aim of this study was to describe the effects of a self-efficacy intervention and an ergonomic education intervention for women with musculoskeletal symptoms, employed in the public sector.Methods: The design of the study was a 9-month prospective study describing the effects of two interventions, a comprehensive self-efficacy intervention (n = 21) and an ergonomic education intervention ( n = 21). Data were obtained by a self-report questionnaire on health-and work ability-related factors at baseline, and at ten weeks and nine months follow-up. Within-group differences over time were analysed.Results: Over the time period studied there were small magnitudes of improvements within each group. Within the self-efficacy intervention group positive effects in perceived work ability were shown. The ergonomic education group showed increased positive beliefs about future work ability and a more frequent use of pain coping strategies.Conclusion: Both interventions showed positive effects on women with musculoskeletal symptoms, but in different ways. Future research in this area should tailor interventions to participants' motivation and readiness to change.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2008. Vol. 9, 105- p.
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-7244DOI: 10.1186/1471-2474-9-105ISI: 000258792800002Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-49649115972OAI: oai:DiVA.org:miun-7244DiVA: diva2:127097
Note

VR-Medicine, External

Available from: 2008-11-30 Created: 2008-11-30 Last updated: 2016-10-11Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

fulltext(319 kB)14 downloads
File information
File name FULLTEXT01.pdfFile size 319 kBChecksum SHA-512
eda8cb43c0a497969bd37856017189d628a2c4be242b193633c7717ecee49197c47220f6024d7f3665ff0c444d36292a9880086c0ccf2ed5ad6bb152e09e215d
Type fulltextMimetype application/pdf

Other links

Publisher's full textScopus

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Karlqvist, Lena
By organisation
Department of Health Sciences
In the same journal
BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar
Total: 14 downloads
The number of downloads is the sum of all downloads of full texts. It may include eg previous versions that are now no longer available

Altmetric score

Total: 32 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf