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Ward visits- one essential step in intensive care follow-up: An interview study with critical care nurses’ and ward nurses’
Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Nursing Sciences.
Region of Jämtland Härjedalen.
Region of Jämtland Härjedalen.
Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Nursing Sciences.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-8669-416x
2018 (English)In: Intensive & Critical Care Nursing, ISSN 0964-3397, E-ISSN 1532-4036, Vol. 49, p. 21-27Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: The aim of this study was to describe critical care nurses’ and ward nurses’ perceptions of the benefits and challenges with a nurse-led follow-up service for intensive care-survivors at general wards. Background: Patients recently transferred from intensive care to the general ward are still vulnerable and require complex care. There are different models of intensive care follow-up services and some include ward visits after transfer from intensive care. Research methodology/design: This study had a qualitative design. Data from 13 semi-structured interviews with Swedish critical care nurses and ward nurses were analysed using qualitative content analysis. Findings: The findings consisted of one theme, namely, “Being a part of an intra-organisational collaboration for improved quality of care”, and four subthemes: “Provides additional care for the vulnerable patients, “Strengthens ward-based critical care”, “Requires coordination and information”, and “Creates an exchange of knowledge”. The nurse-led follow-up service detected signs of deterioration and led to better quality of care. However, shortage of time, lack of interaction, feedback and information about the function of the follow-up service led to problems. Conclusion: The findings indicate that ward visits should be included in the intensive care follow-up service. Furthermore, intra-organisational collaboration seems to be essential for intensive care survivors’ quality of care. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2018. Vol. 49, p. 21-27
Keywords [en]
Critical care, Discharge, Follow-up, Patient safety, Qualitative content analysis, Ward nurses
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-35047DOI: 10.1016/j.iccn.2018.08.011ISI: 000450923300004PubMedID: 30245151Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85053806594OAI: oai:DiVA.org:miun-35047DiVA, id: diva2:1268055
Available from: 2018-12-04 Created: 2018-12-04 Last updated: 2018-12-11Bibliographically approved

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Häggström, MarieRising Holmström, Malin

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