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Socialist Communication Strategies And The Spring Of 1917: Managing revolutionary opinion through the media system
Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Humanities and Social Sciences. Univ Jyväskylä, Jyväskylä, Finland.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-3386-4396
2019 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of History, ISSN 0346-8755, E-ISSN 1502-7716, Vol. 44, no 2, p. 169-192Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The Russian Revolution of 1917 presented Swedish Social Democrats with a dilemma: how could they use the transnational revolutionary momentum to further universal suffrage, without supporting actions possibly leading to violence? In striking this balance, the use of communications was central. This article uses the concept of the media system to analyse the communicative practices and strategies developed by the Party in the early 20th century, and how these were employed between 1915 and 1917, in relation to the hunger marches and revolutionary pressures. The study shows that the Party had established conscious agitation strategies and an elaborate national communication structure, which enabled coordinated opinion activities. As early as 1915, the Party began using these tools to initiate a national opinion movement concerning the food situation. In 1917, faced with the combination of events in Russia and erupting hunger marches, the Party leadership chose to emphasize security and stability, focusing on events the Party could control, such as the 1 May demonstrations. The resulting development of revolutionary opinion in Sweden during the spring of 1917 and the ensuing political changes reflected conscious media management strategies by the Left, who used the media system to navigate and shape a transnational revolutionary moment. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2019. Vol. 44, no 2, p. 169-192
Keywords [en]
history of political communication, media history, transnational revolution
National Category
Media and Communications
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-34600DOI: 10.1080/03468755.2018.1500394ISI: 000461781600003Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85052923417OAI: oai:DiVA.org:miun-34600DiVA, id: diva2:1253000
Available from: 2018-10-03 Created: 2018-10-03 Last updated: 2019-05-20Bibliographically approved

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Harvard, Jonas

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Citation style
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Output format
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