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Commercially available compression garments or electrical stimulation do not enhance recovery following a sprint competition in elite cross-country skiers
Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences. (Swedish Winter Sports Research Centre)ORCID iD: 0000-0001-6224-0454
Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences. (Swedish Winter Sports Research Centre)ORCID iD: 0000-0003-4433-1218
Newcastle University, UK.
Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences. (Swedish Winter Sports Research Centre)
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2018 (English)In: European Journal of Sport Science, ISSN 1746-1391, E-ISSN 1536-7290, Vol. 18, no 10, p. 1299-1308Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study investigated whether commercially available compression garments (COMP) exerting a moderate level of pressureand/or neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) accelerate recovery following a cross-country sprint skiing competitioncompared with a control group (CON) consisting of active recovery only. Twenty-one senior (12 males, 9 females) and 11junior (6 males, 5 females) Swedish national team skiers performed an outdoor sprint skiing competition involving foursprints lasting ∼3–4 min. Before the competition, skiers were matched by sex and skiing level (senior versus junior) andrandomly assigned to COMP (n = 11), NMES (n = 11) or CON (n = 10). Creatine kinase (CK), urea, countermovementjump (CMJ) height, and perceived muscle pain were measured before and 8, 20, 44 and 68 h after competition. NeitherCOMP nor NMES promoted the recovery of blood biomarkers, CMJ or perceived pain post-competition compared withCON (all P > .05). When grouping all 32 participants, urea and perceived muscle pain increased from baseline, peaking at8 h (standardised mean difference (SMD), [95% confidence intervals (CIs)]): 2.8 [2.3, 3.2]) and 44 h (odds ratio [95%CI]: 3.3 [2.1, 5.1]) post-competition, respectively. Additionally, CMJ was lower than baseline 44 and 68 h postcompetitionin both males and females (P < .05). CK increased from baseline in males, peaking at 44 h (SMD: 1.4 [−0.4,0.9]), but was decreased in females at 20 h post-competition (SMD: −0.8 [−1.4, −0.2]). In conclusion, cross-countrysprint skiing induced symptoms of exercise-induced muscle damage peaking 8–44 h post-competition. However, neitherCOMP nor NMES promoted physiological or perceptual recovery compared with CON.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2018. Vol. 18, no 10, p. 1299-1308
Keywords [en]
Countermovement jump, creatine kinase, muscle damage, performance, urea
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-34475DOI: 10.1080/17461391.2018.1484521ISI: 000444565000001PubMedID: 29924696Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85048822175OAI: oai:DiVA.org:miun-34475DiVA, id: diva2:1250242
Available from: 2018-09-22 Created: 2018-09-22 Last updated: 2019-01-31Bibliographically approved

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Govus, AndrewAndersson, Erik P.Provis, HollyMcGawley, Kerry

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