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The impact of intimate partner violence on forgone healthcare: a population-based, multicentre European study
University of Porto, Porto, Portugal.
Canterbury Christ Church University, Canterbury, Kent, UK.
National School of Public Health Athens, Athens, Greece.
Protestant University of Applied Sciences Ludwigsburg, Ludwigsburg, Germany; University of Applied Sciences Emden, Emden, Germany; WRSC, Brandeis University, Waltham, MA, USA.
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2019 (English)In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 29, no 2, p. 359-364Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND:

To examine the relationship between forgone healthcare and involvement in intimate partner violence (IPV) as victims, perpetrators or both.

METHODS:

This cross-sectional multicentre study assessed community non-institutionalized residents (n = 3496, aged 18-64) randomly selected from six European cities: Athens, Budapest, London, Östersund, Porto, Stuttgart. A common questionnaire was used, including self-reports of IPV and forgone healthcare ('Have you been in need of a certain care service in the past year, but did not seek any help?'). Odds ratios (ORs), 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were computed fitting logistic regression models adjusted for city, chronic disease, self-assessed health status and financial strain.

RESULTS:

Participants experiencing past year IPV (vs. no violence) reported more often to forgone healthcare (n = 3279, 18.6% vs. 15.3%, P = 0.016). IPV experienced as both a victim and perpetrator was associated with forgone healthcare (adjusted OR, 95%CI: 1.32, 1.02-1.70).

CONCLUSION:

IPV was associated with forgone healthcare, particularly for those experiencing violence as both victims and perpetrators. Results suggest that preventing IPV among adults may improve timely healthcare uptake.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2019. Vol. 29, no 2, p. 359-364
Keywords [en]
domestic violence, adult, chronic disease, health status, internship and residency, multicenter studies, violence, medical residencies, community, perpetrator of child and adult abuse
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-34350DOI: 10.1093/eurpub/cky167ISI: 000463809200029PubMedID: 30169658Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85063605533OAI: oai:DiVA.org:miun-34350DiVA, id: diva2:1246507
Available from: 2018-09-07 Created: 2018-09-07 Last updated: 2019-05-24Bibliographically approved

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Soares, JoaquimSundin, Örjan

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