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Intravenous Iron Does Not Augment the Hemoglobin Mass Response to Simulated Hypoxia
Australian Catholic Univ, Mary Mackillop Inst Hlth Res, Melbourne, Vic, Australia; Australian Inst Sport, Canberra, ACT, Australia.
Australian Inst Sport, Canberra, ACT, Australia.
Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences. (Swedish Winter Sports Research Centre)ORCID iD: 0000-0001-6224-0454
Western Australian Inst Sport, Perth, WA, Australia; Univ Western Australia, Sch Human Sci Exercise & Sports Sci, Perth, WA, Australia.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-3895-0015
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2018 (English)In: Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, ISSN 0195-9131, E-ISSN 1530-0315, Vol. 50, no 8, p. 1669-1678Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose Iron is integral for erythropoietic adaptation to hypoxia, yet the importance of supplementary iron compared with existing stores is poorly understood. The aim of the present study was to compare the magnitude of the hemoglobin mass (Hb(mass)) in response to altitude in athletes with intravenous (IV), oral, or placebo iron supplementation. Methods Thirty-four, nonanemic, endurance-trained athletes completed 3 wk of simulated altitude (3000 m, 14 hd(-1)), receiving two to three bolus iron injections (ferric carboxymaltose), daily oral iron supplementation (ferrous sulfate), or a placebo, commencing 2 wk before and throughout altitude exposure. Hb(mass) and markers of iron regulation were assessed at baseline (day -14), immediately before (day 0), weekly during (days 8 and 15), and immediately, 1, 3, and 6 wk after (days 22, 28, 42, and 63) the completion of altitude exposure. Results Hb(mass) significantly increased after altitude exposure in athletes with IV (mean % [90% confidence interval (CI)], 3.7% [2.8-4.7]) and oral (3.2% [2.2-4.2]) supplementation and remained elevated at 7 d postaltitude in oral (2.9% [1.5-4.3]) and 21 d after in IV (3.0% [1.5-4.6]) supplementation. Hb(mass) was not significantly higher than baseline at any time point in placebo. Conclusions Iron supplementation appears necessary for optimal erythropoietic adaptation to altitude exposure. IV iron supplementation during 3 wk of simulated live high-train low altitude training offered no additional benefit in terms of the magnitude of the erythropoietic response for nonanemic endurance athletes compared with oral supplementation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2018. Vol. 50, no 8, p. 1669-1678
Keywords [en]
Ferric Carboxymaltose, Erythroferrone, Hepcidin, Hemoglobin Mass, Altitude Training
National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-34229DOI: 10.1249/MSS.0000000000001608ISI: 000438542000016PubMedID: 29538179Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85049833929OAI: oai:DiVA.org:miun-34229DiVA, id: diva2:1238335
Available from: 2018-08-13 Created: 2018-08-13 Last updated: 2018-09-28Bibliographically approved

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