miun.sePublications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Plasticity in central neural drive with short-term disuse and recovery - effects on muscle strength and influence of aging
Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark.
University of Southern Denmark (SDU), Denmark.
Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences. University of Southern Denmark (SDU), Denmark. (Swedish Winter Sports Research Centre)
University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
Show others and affiliations
2018 (English)In: Experimental Gerontology, ISSN 0531-5565, E-ISSN 1873-6815, Vol. 106, p. 145-153Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

While short-term disuse negatively affects mechanical muscle function (e.g. isometric muscle strength) little is known of the relative contribution of adaptions in central neural drive and peripheral muscle contractility. The present study investigated the relative contribution of adaptations in central neural drive and peripheral muscle contractility on changes in isometric muscle strength following short-term unilateral disuse (4 days, knee brace) and subsequent active recovery (7 days, one session of resistance training) in young (n = 11, 24 yrs) and old healthy men (n = 11, 67 yrs). Maximal isometric knee extensor strength (MVC) (isokinetic dynamometer), voluntary muscle activation (superimposed twitch technique), and electrically evoked muscle twitch force (single and doublet twitch stimulation) were assessed prior to and after disuse, and after recovery. Following disuse, relative decreases in MVC did not differ statistically between old (16.4 ± 3.7%, p < 0.05) and young (−9.7 ± 2.9%, p < 0.05) (mean ± SE), whereas voluntary muscle activation decreased more (p < 0.05) in old (−8.4 ± 3.5%, p < 0.05) compared to young (−1.1 ± 1.0%, ns) as did peak single (−25.8 ± 6.6%, p < 0.05 vs −7.6 ± 3.3%, p < 0.05) and doublet twitch force (−23.2 ± 5.5%, p < 0.05 vs −2.0 ± 2.6%, ns). All parameters were restored in young following 7 days recovery, whereas MVC and peak twitch force remained suppressed in old. Regression analysis revealed that disuse-induced changes in MVC relied more on changes in single twitch force in young (p < 0.05) and more on changes in voluntary muscle activation in old (p < 0.05), whereas recovery-induced changes in MVC mainly were explained by gains in voluntary muscle activation in both young and old. Altogether, the present data demonstrate that plasticity in voluntary muscle activation (~central neural drive) is a dominant mechanism affecting short-term disuse- and recovery-induced changes in muscle strength in older adults. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2018. Vol. 106, p. 145-153
Keyword [en]
Central neural drive, Disuse, Mechanical muscle function, Muscle contractile properties, Voluntary muscle activation
National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-33377DOI: 10.1016/j.exger.2018.02.019Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85043470201OAI: oai:DiVA.org:miun-33377DiVA, id: diva2:1193986
Available from: 2018-03-28 Created: 2018-03-28 Last updated: 2018-03-28Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full textScopus

Authority records BETA

Ørtenblad, Niels

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Ørtenblad, Niels
By organisation
Department of Health Sciences
In the same journal
Experimental Gerontology
Health Sciences

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf