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Are the effects of unreal violent video games pronounced when playing with a virtual reality system?
UniversidadeLuso´fona de Humanidades e Tecnologias (ULHT), Lisboa, Portugal.
ISCTE, Lisboa, Portugal.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-5403-0091
UniversidadeLuso´fona de Humanidades e Tecnologias (ULHT), Lisboa, Portugal.
ISCTE, Lisboa, Portugal.
2008 (English)In: Aggressive Behavior, ISSN 0096-140X, E-ISSN 1098-2337, Vol. 34, no 5, p. 521-538Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study was conducted to analyze the short‐term effects of violent electronic games, played with or without a virtual reality (VR) device, on the instigation of aggressive behavior. Physiological arousal (heart rate (HR)), priming of aggressive thoughts, and state hostility were also measured to test their possible mediation on the relationship between playing the violent game (VG) and aggression. The participants—148 undergraduate students—were randomly assigned to four treatment conditions: two groups played a violent computer game (Unreal Tournament), and the other two a non‐violent game (Motocross Madness), half with a VR device and the remaining participants on the computer screen. In order to assess the game effects the following instruments were used: a BIOPAC System MP100 to measure HR, an Emotional Stroop task to analyze the priming of aggressive and fear thoughts, a self‐report State Hostility Scale to measure hostility, and a competitive reaction‐time task to assess aggressive behavior. The main results indicated that the violent computer game had effects on state hostility and aggression. Although no significant mediation effect could be detected, regression analyses showed an indirect effect of state hostility between playing a VG and aggression. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2008. Vol. 34, no 5, p. 521-538
Keywords [en]
violent electronic games, virtual reality system, aggression
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-33185DOI: 10.1002/ab.20272OAI: oai:DiVA.org:miun-33185DiVA, id: diva2:1188205
Available from: 2018-03-06 Created: 2018-03-06 Last updated: 2018-03-20Bibliographically approved

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Esteves, Francisco

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