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The Effect of Dietary Nitrate on Nocturnal Sleep-Disordered Breathing and Arterial Oxygen Desaturation at High Altitude
Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences. Norwegian Heart & Lung Patient Org, LHL Klinikkene Roros, Oslo, Norway.
Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Sleep Disorders Ctr, Pulm Med, Gothenburg.
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2017 (English)In: High Altitude Medicine & Biology, ISSN 1527-0297, E-ISSN 1557-8682Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Patrician, Alexander, Harald Engan, David Lundsten, Ludger Grote, Helena Vigetun-Haughey, and Erika Schagatay. The effect of dietary nitrate on nocturnal sleep-disordered breathing and arterial oxygen desaturation at high altitude. High Alt Med Biol 00:000-000, 2017.Sleep-disordered breathing and fluctuations in arterial oxygen saturation (SaO(2)) are common during sleep among lowlanders ascending to high altitude. Dietary nitrate (NO3-) supplementation has been shown to lower the O-2 consumption in various conditions. Our objective was to investigate whether dietary NO3- could reduce sleep-disordered breathing and SaO(2) desaturation during sleep at altitude. Cardiorespiratory responses during sleep were measured in 10 healthy lowlanders at 330m and then again in the Himalayas at 3700-4900m. Each subject received two 70mL shots of either beetroot juice (BR; approximate to 5.0mmol NO3- per shot) or placebo (PL: approximate to 0.003mmol NO3- per shot) in a single-blinded, weighted order over two consecutive nights at altitude. At 2.5-4.5 hours into sleep at altitude, BR increased the SaO(2) desaturation drop (4.2 [0.1]% with PL vs. 5.3 [0.4]% with BR; p=0.024) and decreased the SaO(2) desaturation duration (14.1 [0.9] seconds with PL to 11.1 [0.9] seconds with BR; p=0.0.041). There was a reduction in breaths with flow limitation (p=0.025), but no changes in Apnea-Hypopnea Index (AHI), mean and minimum SaO(2). The study suggests BR supplementation does not improve AHI or oxygenation, but may increase fluctuations in arterial O-2 saturation during sleep at altitude in native lowlanders.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2017.
Keyword [en]
arterial oxygen desaturation, dietary nitrate, hypobaric hypoxia, pulmonary vasculature, sleep at high altitude
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-32569DOI: 10.1089/ham.2017.0039ISI: 000417305600001OAI: oai:DiVA.org:miun-32569DiVA: diva2:1168735
Available from: 2017-12-21 Created: 2017-12-21 Last updated: 2017-12-21Bibliographically approved

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Patrician, AlexanderEngan, Harald K.Schagatay, Erika

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