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Multimodal Emotion Recognition Is Resilient to Insufficient Sleep: Results From Cross-Sectional and Experimental Studies
Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Neurosci, Stockholm.
Stockholm Univ, Dept Psychol, Stockholm,.
Stockholm Univ, Dept Psychol, Stockholm.
Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Psychology.
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2017 (English)In: Sleep, ISSN 0161-8105, E-ISSN 1550-9109, Vol. 40, no 11, article id UNSP zsx145Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives: Insufficient sleep has been associated with impaired recognition of facial emotions. However, previous studies have found inconsistent results, potentially stemming from the type of static picture task used. We therefore examined whether insufficient sleep was associated with decreased emotion recognition ability in two separate studies using a dynamic multimodal task. Methods: Study 1 used a cross-sectional design consisting of 291 participants with questionnaire measures assessing sleep duration and self-reported sleep quality for the previous night. Study 2 used an experimental design involving 181 participants where individuals were quasi-randomized into either a sleep-deprivation (N = 90) or a sleep-control (N = 91) condition. All participants from both studies were tested on the same forced-choice multimodal test of emotion recognition to assess the accuracy of emotion categorization. Results: Sleep duration, self-reported sleep quality (study 1), and sleep deprivation (study 2) did not predict overall emotion recognition accuracy or speed. Similarly, the responses to each of the twelve emotions tested showed no evidence of impaired recognition ability, apart from one positive association suggesting that greater self-reported sleep quality could predict more accurate recognition of disgust (study 1). Conclusions: The studies presented here involve considerably larger samples than previous studies and the results support the null hypotheses. Therefore, we suggest that the ability to accurately categorize the emotions of others is not associated with short-term sleep duration or sleep quality and is resilient to acute periods of insufficient sleep.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2017. Vol. 40, no 11, article id UNSP zsx145
Keywords [en]
Sleep deprivation, emotion, emotion recognition, perception, social
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-32567DOI: 10.1093/sleep/zsx145ISI: 000417043000005Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85044532634OAI: oai:DiVA.org:miun-32567DiVA, id: diva2:1168624
Available from: 2017-12-21 Created: 2017-12-21 Last updated: 2018-04-16Bibliographically approved

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Bänziger, Tanja

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