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Educational nurse-led lifestyle intervention for persons with mental illness.
Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Nursing Sciences.
Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Nursing Sciences.
Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Nursing Sciences. Högskolan i Gävle; Center for Care Research, Steinkjer, Norway.
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2018 (English)In: International Journal of Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 1445-8330, E-ISSN 1447-0349, Vol. 27, no 3, p. 1022-1031Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Although persons with severe mental illness face an increased risk of mortality and of developing negative health outcomes, research has shown that lifestyle interventions can sufficiently support their health. In response, this study examined a nurse-led lifestyle intervention developed in cooperation with members of municipal and county councils to gauge its impact on the quality of life, cognitive performance, walking capacity, and body composition of persons with severe mental illness. Lasting 26 weeks and involving 38 persons with severe mental illness, the intervention prioritised two components: the interpersonal relationships of persons with severe mental illness, staff, and group leaders and group education about physical and mental health. Pre-post intervention measurements of quality of life collected with the Manchester Short Assessment of Quality of Life, cognitive performance with the Frontal Systems Behaviour Scale, walking capacity with a 6-min walk test, and body composition in terms of waist circumference and body mass index were analysed using a nonparametric test Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Results suggest that the intervention afforded significant improvements in the health-related variables of quality of life, cognitive performance, walking capacity, and waist circumference for persons with severe mental illness. However, long-term studies with control groups and that examine parameters related to cardiovascular risk factors are essential to ensure the sustained impact of the intervention.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2018. Vol. 27, no 3, p. 1022-1031
Keywords [en]
clinical practice, educational intervention, healthy lifestyle support, interpersonal relationship, severe mental illness
National Category
Clinical Medicine
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-32479DOI: 10.1111/inm.12410ISI: 000431999300011PubMedID: 29171905Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85035026741OAI: oai:DiVA.org:miun-32479DiVA, id: diva2:1167081
Available from: 2017-12-05 Created: 2017-12-18 Last updated: 2018-05-31Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Supporting healthy lifestyle habits in persons with mental disorders: The development of a nurse-led lifestyle intervention
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Supporting healthy lifestyle habits in persons with mental disorders: The development of a nurse-led lifestyle intervention
2018 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Persons with mental disorders have an increased risk of developing health problems. One reason for this is poor lifestyle habit support. The aim of this thesis was to develop and evaluate a nurse-led lifestyle intervention for persons with mental disorders. Two versions of the intervention were conducted in the municipality (versions I, II) and one in a primary healthcare setting (version III). The educational elements of the intervention were led by nurses and practically executed by nursing staff (study II and III). In study IV education was both led and executed in practice by nurses. Data were collected through focus groups, individual interviews, and measurements. Study I, a qualitative development study, showed that, when motivating for lifestyle changes, it was important to structure daily life and provide emotional support. Loneliness, lack of knowledge and support, and general resources were identified as barriers to lifestyle changes. Version I contained health education for nursing staff and individual lifestyle habit support to persons with mental disorders, which included physical exercises and cognitive support. Study II was a qualitative acceptability study of the intervention (version I) and its assessment tools. The intervention with its relational, educational, and supportive dimensions and the assessment tools was promising. In Study III (version II), a quantitative pilot study, persons with mental disorders received health education together with the nursing staff. The intervention provided improvements to various degrees in health-related variables of quality of life, cognitive performance, walking capacity, and waist circumference. Study IV (version III), a qualitative study, included health education and individual lifestyle habit support for young adults with mental illness. The young adults experienced challenges including psychiatric symptoms, loneliness, and a lack of social understanding. The thesis results showed that the core components of the intervention with interpersonal relationships, where nursing staff played an important role, and further components such as health education and health discussions, in addition to cognitive support, worked well together to support lifestyle habit changes. Those components already exist and may therefore be easy to implement into daily nursing practice in different housing conditions and with individuals of different ages and needs for mental health care support. Group education was a way not only to develop new health strategies but also to establish social relationships. The intervention may also be modified to work with other groups of persons who need more explicit lifestyle habit support. However, to better determine the efficacy and sustainability of the intervention, larger studies over a longer time should be conducted.

 

 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sundsvall: Mid Sweden Univsersity, 2018. p. 117
Series
Mid Sweden University doctoral thesis, ISSN 1652-893X ; 279
Keywords
interpersonal relationships, lifestyle intervention, mental disorders, mental illness, nurse-led
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-33358 (URN)978-91-88527-46-2 (ISBN)
Public defence
2018-05-18, M108, Sundsvall, 10:30 (Swedish)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2018-03-27 Created: 2018-03-27 Last updated: 2018-04-05Bibliographically approved

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Rönngren, YlvaBjörk, AnnetteAudulv, ÅsaEnmarker, IngelaKristiansen, LisbethHaage, David

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Rönngren, YlvaBjörk, AnnetteAudulv, ÅsaEnmarker, IngelaKristiansen, LisbethHaage, David
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International Journal of Mental Health Nursing
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