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Thresholds in nesting habitat requirements of an old forest specialist, the Brown Creeper (Certhia americana), as conservation targets
Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences, Engineering and Mathematics.
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2008 (English)In: Biological Conservation, ISSN 0006-3207, Vol. 141, no 4, 1129-1137 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Many bird species respond to forestry, even at moderate intensities. In New Brunswick, Canada, the Brown Creeper exhibits a negative, threshold response to harvesting intensity. This study aimed to determine whether (a) the threshold found in Brown Creeper occurrence is lower than eventual thresholds in its nesting requirements, and whether (b) the conservation of this species could be achieved through moderate-intensity harvest systems. Creepers are particularly sensitive to forestry because they nest on snags with peeling bark and they mainly forage on large-diameter trees. In northern hardwood stands, we compared habitat structure at local- (r = 80 m) and neighbourhood-scales (r = 250 m) around nest sites and sites not used by creepers. Over two years, we found 76 nests, 66 of which were paired with unused sites for comparison. At the local scale, densities of trees 30 cm dbh and snags 10 cm dbh, and the probability of presence of potential nest sites were significantly higher near nests than at sites where no creepers were detected. At the neighbourhood scale, the area of untreated mature forest was significantly higher around nests. Variance decomposition indicated that habitat variables at the local scale accounted for the majority of explained variation in nest site selection. We also found significant thresholds in the densities of large trees (127/ha) and snags (56/ha), and in the area of mature forest (10.4 ha). The conservation of breeding populations of Brown Creepers may thus require densities of large trees nearly twice as high as those associated with its probability of presence. Such a target seems to be incompatible even with moderate-intensity harvesting.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2008. Vol. 141, no 4, 1129-1137 p.
Keyword [en]
Certhia americana; Conservation targets; Ecological thresholds; Northern hardwood forest; ROC analysis; Selection harvesting
National Category
Biological Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-6749DOI: 10.1016/j.biocon.2008.02.012ISI: 000256182700022Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-41949099757Local ID: 5962OAI: oai:DiVA.org:miun-6749DiVA: diva2:113804
Note
VR-BiologyAvailable from: 2008-11-19 Created: 2008-10-28 Last updated: 2009-11-02Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf