miun.sePublications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Time-dependent breakdown of fiber networks: Uncertainty of lifetime
Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Chemical Engineering.
Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Chemical Engineering.
2017 (English)In: Physical review. E, ISSN 2470-0045, E-ISSN 2470-0053, Vol. 95, no 5, 053005Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Materials often fail when subjected to stresses over a prolonged period. The time to failure, also called the lifetime, is known to exhibit large variability of many materials, particularly brittle and quasibrittle materials. For example, a coefficient of variation reaches 100% or even more. Its distribution shape is highly skewed toward zero lifetime, implying a large number of premature failures. This behavior contrasts with that of normal strength, which shows a variation of only 4%-10% and a nearly bell-shaped distribution. The fundamental cause of this large and unique variability of lifetime is not well understood because of the complex interplay between stochastic processes taking place on the molecular level and the hierarchical and disordered structure of the material. We have constructed fiber network models, both regular and random, as a paradigm for general material structures. With such networks, we have performed Monte Carlo simulations of creep failure to establish explicit relationships among fiber characteristics, network structures, system size, and lifetime distribution. We found that fiber characteristics have large, sometimes dominating, influences on the lifetime variability of a network. Among the factors investigated, geometrical disorders of the network were found to be essential to explain the large variability and highly skewed shape of the lifetime distribution. With increasing network size, the distribution asymptotically approaches a double-exponential form. The implication of this result is that, so-called "infant mortality," which is often predicted by the Weibull approximation of the lifetime distribution, may not exist for a large system.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2017. Vol. 95, no 5, 053005
National Category
Chemical Engineering
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-31029DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevE.95.053005ISI: 000402477200018PubMedID: 28618530Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85020188677OAI: oai:DiVA.org:miun-31029DiVA: diva2:1115738
Available from: 2017-06-27 Created: 2017-06-27 Last updated: 2017-08-08Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMedScopus

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Mattsson, AmandaUesaka, Tetsu
By organisation
Department of Chemical Engineering
In the same journal
Physical review. E
Chemical Engineering

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

Altmetric score

Total: 50 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf