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A study on the pyrolysis behaviour of different biomass fuels using thermogravimetry and online gas analysis
Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Chemical Engineering.
Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Chemical Engineering.
Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Chemical Engineering.
2016 (English)In: European Biomass Conference and Exhibition Proceedings, ETA-Florence Renewable Energies , 2016, Vol. 24thEUBCE, no 24thEUBCE, 1290-1293 p.Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Fuel availability and flexibility are important issues for biomass-based heat/power and advanced biofuel plants. The physical and chemical properties of biomass feedstocks vary from one to others to a great degree, which must be taken care of for the reactor design/operation, system optimization and blend feedstock application. In this work, the biomass property is evaluated based on pyrolysis behavior of biomass fuels by means of TGA and online gas analysis. Wood, pine bark, peat, straw, black liquor and microalgae are chosen as the biomass feedstocks for the pyrolysis study. The measurement results show high volatile content for algae and black liquor (around 85%) and low volatile content for pine bark and peat (around 69%). Differently from woody biomass, the DTG curve of straw has a single dominant peak at much lower temperature, which suggests a dominant component of hemicellulose in biomass, while algae and peat have a broader temperature specturm of devolatilization but much lower peak temperature. CO2 is released first and H2 later in the pyrolysis process for all biomass feedstocks, whileas the peak of CO formation follows CO2 formation trend for most feedstocks used, except for peat and pine bark which give a peak later at high temperature. This indicates secondary reactions of tar cracking, steam reforming and char gasification.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ETA-Florence Renewable Energies , 2016. Vol. 24thEUBCE, no 24thEUBCE, 1290-1293 p.
Keyword [en]
Biomass feedstock, Fuel lexibility, Pyrolysis, TGA
National Category
Chemical Engineering
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-30993Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85019760282OAI: oai:DiVA.org:miun-30993DiVA: diva2:1115127
Conference
European Biomass Conference and Exhibition
Note

Export Date: 26 June 2017; Conference Paper; Correspondence Address: Zhang, W.; Department of Chemical Engineering/FSCN, Mid Sweden UniversitySweden; email: wennan.zhang@miun.se

Available from: 2017-06-26 Created: 2017-06-26 Last updated: 2017-06-26Bibliographically approved

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Henschel, TillSöderlind, UlfZhang, Wennan

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