miun.sePublications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Near-Infrared Spectroscopy: More Accurate Than Heart Rate for Monitoring Intensity in Running in Hilly Terrain
University of Würzburg. (Nationellt Vintersportcentrum)
University of Salzburg, Salzburg, Austria.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-6685-1540
Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences. (Nationellt Vintersportcentrum)
Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences. (Nationellt Vintersportcentrum)
2017 (English)In: International Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance, ISSN 1555-0265, E-ISSN 1555-0273, Vol. 12, no 4, p. 440-447Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose:

To 1) investigate the cardiorespiratory and metabolic response of trail running and 2) evaluate whether heart rate (HR) adequately reflects the exercise intensity or whether the tissue saturation index (TSI) could provide a more accurate measure when running in hilly terrain.

Methods:

Seventeen competitive runners (female: n=4, V’O2max: 55±6 mL·kg−1·min−1; male: n=13, V’O2max: 68±6 mL·kg−1·min−1) performed a time trial on an off-road trail course. The course was made up of two laps covering a total distance of 7 km and included six steep up- and downhill sections with an elevation gain of 486 m. All runners were equipped with a portable breath-by-breath gas analyzer, HR belt, global positioning system receiver and near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) device to measure the TSI.

Results:

During the trail run, the exercise intensity within the uphill and downhill sections was 94±2% and 91±3% of HRmax, 84±8% and 68±7% of V’O2max, respectively. The oxygen uptake (V’O2) increased within the uphill and decreased within the downhill sections (P< .01). While HR was unaffected by the altering slope conditions, the TSI was inversely correlated to the changes in V’O2 (r = - .70, P< .05).

Conclusions:

The HR was unaffected by the continuously changing exercise intensity, however, the TSI reflected the alternations in V’O2. Recently used exclusively for scientific purpose, this NIRS based variable may offer a more accurate alternative to HR to monitor running intensity in the future, especially for training and competition in hilly terrain.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2017. Vol. 12, no 4, p. 440-447
Keyword [en]
athlete, elite, tissue saturation, undulating terrain
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-29177DOI: 10.1123/ijspp.2016-0101ISI: 000403745600004PubMedID: 27396389OAI: oai:DiVA.org:miun-29177DiVA: diva2:1043755
Projects
Trailrunning
Available from: 2016-10-31 Created: 2016-10-31 Last updated: 2017-12-14Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMed

Authority records BETA

Stöggl, ThomasSwarén, MikaelBjörklund, Glenn

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Stöggl, ThomasSwarén, MikaelBjörklund, Glenn
By organisation
Department of Health Sciences
In the same journal
International Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance
Sport and Fitness Sciences

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn
Total: 336 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf