miun.sePublications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Self-harm as a risk factor for inpatient aggression among women admitted to forensic psychiatric care
School of Law, Psychology and Social Work, Örebro University.
Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Social Sciences.
School of Law, Psychology and Social Work, Örebro University; Centre for Forensic Behavioural Science at Swinburne University of Technology, Melbourne, Australia.
2016 (English)In: Nordic Journal of Psychiatry, ISSN 0803-9488, E-ISSN 1502-4725, Vol. 70, no 7, p. 554-560Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Inpatient aggression among female forensic psychiatric patients has been shown to be associated with self-harm, that is considered to be a historical risk factor for violence. Research on associations between previous or current self-harm and different types of inpatient aggression is missing.Aim: The aim of this register study was to investigate the prevalence of self-harm and the type of inpatient aggression among female forensic psychiatric inpatients, and to study whether the patients' self-harm before and/or during forensic psychiatric care is a risk factor for inpatient aggression.Methods: Female forensic psychiatric patients (n=130) from a high security hospital were included.Results: The results showed that 88% of the female patients had self-harmed at least once during their life and 57% had been physically and/or verbally aggressive towards staff or other patients while in care at the hospital. Self-harm before admission to the current forensic psychiatric care or repeated self-harm were not significantly associated with inpatient aggression, whereas self-harm during care was significantly associated with physical and verbal aggression directed at staff.Conclusions: These results pointed towards self-harm being a dynamic risk factor rather than a historical risk factor for inpatient aggression among female forensic psychiatric patients. Whether self-harm is an individual risk factor or a part of the clinical risk factor Symptom of major mental illness' within the HCR-20V3 must be further explored among women. Thus, addressing self-harm committed by female patients during forensic psychiatric care seems to be important in risk assessments and the management of violence, especially in reducing violence against staff in high-security forensic psychiatric services.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2016. Vol. 70, no 7, p. 554-560
Keywords [en]
Forensic psychiatry, inpatient aggression, risk factor, self-harm, women
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-29100DOI: 10.1080/08039488.2016.1183707ISI: 000383037300012PubMedID: 27224513Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84969784600OAI: oai:DiVA.org:miun-29100DiVA, id: diva2:1037213
Available from: 2016-10-14 Created: 2016-10-14 Last updated: 2017-11-29Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMedScopus
By organisation
Department of Social Sciences
In the same journal
Nordic Journal of Psychiatry
Social Sciences

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn
Total: 19 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf