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Women’s experiences of labour induction - findings from a Swedish regional study
Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-6985-6729
Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-4067-2357
2011 (English)In: Australian and New Zealand journal of obstetrics and gynaecology, ISSN 0004-8666, E-ISSN 1479-828X, Vol. 51, no 2, p. 151-157Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Induction of labour is common in modern obstetrics but its impact on women's birth experiences is inconclusive.

Aim: The aim of the present study was to explore the prevalence of induction in a Swedish region and reasons for labour induction. A second aim was to compare the experience of spontaneous labour and birth for women to the experience of induction of labour. A third aim was to explore the difference in labour in relation to the length of pregnancy.

Methods: A one-year cohort of 936 women was included in a longitudinal Swedish survey in which data were collected by questionnaires, two months after birth. The main outcome was a set of data recording women's birth experiences.

Results: Labour induction was performed in 17% of births and mostly performed for medical reasons. Women who were induced used more epidurals (OR 2.3; 95% CI 1.4-3.8) for pain relief and used bath/shower less frequently for pain relief (OR 0.3; 95% CI 0.2-0.5). Labour induction was associated with a less positive birth experience (OR 1.5; 95% CI 1.0-2.3), and women who were induced were more likely to totally agree that they were frightened that the baby would be damaged during birth (OR 2.1; 95% CI 1.2-3.9), but the assessment of feelings during birth differed with regard to length of pregnancy.

Conclusion: Labour induction affects women's experiences of birth and is related to length of pregnancy.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2011. Vol. 51, no 2, p. 151-157
Keywords [en]
birth experience; labour induction; survey
National Category
Nursing Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Medicine
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-11808DOI: 10.1111/j.1479-828X.2010.01.262.xISI: 000289248700011PubMedID: 21466518Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-79953799716OAI: oai:DiVA.org:miun-11808DiVA, id: diva2:328196
Available from: 2010-07-01 Created: 2010-07-01 Last updated: 2017-12-12Bibliographically approved

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Hildingsson, IngegerdKarlström, AnnikaNystedt, Astrid

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NursingObstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Medicine

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