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Media Matter: The Political Influences of the News Media
Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Information Technology and Media. (DEMICOM)
2010 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sundsvall: Mittuniversitetet , 2010. , p. 37
Series
Mid Sweden University doctoral thesis, ISSN 1652-893X ; 84
National Category
Media and Communications
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-11511Local ID: DEMICOMISBN: 978-91-86073-73-2 (print)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:miun-11511DiVA, id: diva2:319143
Public defence
2010-05-28, Sundsvall, 10:00 (Swedish)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2010-05-17 Created: 2010-05-14 Last updated: 2010-05-17Bibliographically approved
List of papers
1. Unemployment on the Agenda: A Panel Study of Agenda Setting Effects during the 2006 Swedish National Election Campaign
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Unemployment on the Agenda: A Panel Study of Agenda Setting Effects during the 2006 Swedish National Election Campaign
2010 (English)In: Journal of Communication, ISSN 0021-9916, E-ISSN 1460-2466, Vol. 60, no 1, p. 182-U264Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The issue of unemployment and job creation dominated news coverage during the 2006 Swedish National Election campaign. At the same time, the percentage of people naming unemployment as the most important political issue increased by 17 percent during the campaign. The purpose of this study is to analyze individual level agenda setting effects in the 2006 Swedish National Election campaign. Apart from being one of the first agenda setting studies conducted in Sweden, this study builds upon a panel survey with 1,007 respondents, which makes it possible to impose stricter control of the causal relationship between the media and public agendas. The overall findings show that agenda setting effects were indeed present. Furthermore, attention to political news had stronger effects among people with low political interest compared to those who were highly interested. Education was not a contingent factor, though.

Keywords
MASS-MEDIA; TELEVISION; ATTRIBUTES; PRINT; NEWS
National Category
Media and Communications
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-9941 (URN)10.1111/j.1460-2466.2009.01475.x (DOI)000274940700015 ()2-s2.0-77950237390 (Scopus ID)DEMICOM (Local ID)DEMICOM (Archive number)DEMICOM (OAI)
Available from: 2009-09-30 Created: 2009-09-30 Last updated: 2017-12-13Bibliographically approved
2. Media Malaise or a Virtuous Circle?: Exploring the Causal Relationships Between News Media Exposure, Political News Attention and Political Interest
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Media Malaise or a Virtuous Circle?: Exploring the Causal Relationships Between News Media Exposure, Political News Attention and Political Interest
2010 (English)In: European Journal of Political Research, ISSN 0304-4130, E-ISSN 1475-6765, Vol. 49, no 5, p. 575-597Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Being politically interested is one of the most important norms from a democratic perspective, as it is a crucial antecedent for voting, political knowledge, civic and political participation, and attentiveness to political information. However, only limited research has focused on the relationship between media use and political interest, despite the notion that modern politics is mediated politics. Even more important is the fact that the causal relationship between media use and political interest still has not been firmly established. Against this background, the purpose of this study is to investigate the causal relationship between news media use and political interest.The results show that there are indeed causal and reciprocal relationships between political interest and attention to political news, and between political interest and exposure to some, but not all, news media. Overall these results lend stronger support to the perspective of media mobilisation theories than media malaise theories.

National Category
Media and Communications Political Science (excluding Public Administration Studies and Globalisation Studies)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-10957 (URN)10.1111/j.1475-6765.2009.01913.x (DOI)000279441100001 ()2-s2.0-77955039994 (Scopus ID)DEMICOM (Local ID)DEMICOM (Archive number)DEMICOM (OAI)
Available from: 2010-01-11 Created: 2010-01-11 Last updated: 2018-01-12Bibliographically approved
3. Pathways to Politics: How Media System Characteristics Can Influence Socioeconomic Gaps in Political Participation
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Pathways to Politics: How Media System Characteristics Can Influence Socioeconomic Gaps in Political Participation
2010 (English)In: Harvard Internation Journal of Press/Politics, ISSN 1081-180X, E-ISSN 1531-328X, Vol. 15, no 3, p. 295-318Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article addresses a key democratic question that has not beenfully answered by political communication research: How do the news media influence gaps in participation between socioeconomic groups? The main purpose is to develop and propose an institutional framework for analyzing how the news media influence participation gaps in different countries. It is argued that past research on media malaise and mobilization effects has not paid attention to the joint influence of two media system characteristics:(1) the strength of media institutions with respect to influencingpolitical participation and (2) the distinctiveness of their population base. European Social Survey data from four democratic corporatist countries is used to analyze both these dimensions of the institutional framework. The results indicate that newspapers and television news might have different influences on participation gaps in these countries, and the findings are discussed in light ofthe specific media system characteristics of democratic corporatist countries. Finally, some suggestions for future cross-national comparative research based on the proposed institutional framework are discussed.

Keywords
Poltical participation, media effects, comparative research, citizens
National Category
Media and Communications Political Science (excluding Public Administration Studies and Globalisation Studies)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-10962 (URN)10.1177/1940161209360930 (DOI)000279354300003 ()2-s2.0-77954569702 (Scopus ID)DEMICOM (Local ID)DEMICOM (Archive number)DEMICOM (OAI)
Available from: 2010-01-11 Created: 2010-01-11 Last updated: 2018-01-12Bibliographically approved
4. Members of Parliament, Equal Competitors for Media Attention?: An Analysis of Personal Contacts Between MPs and Political Journalists in Five Countries.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Members of Parliament, Equal Competitors for Media Attention?: An Analysis of Personal Contacts Between MPs and Political Journalists in Five Countries.
2010 (English)In: Political Communication, ISSN 1058-4609, E-ISSN 1091-7675, Vol. 27, no 3, p. 310-325Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Power relations between politicians and journalists are often depicted as an ongoing tango with one actor leading the other. This study analyzes interactions between politicians and journalists not by posing the question of who leads whom, but rather by investigating which politicians are invited to dance in the first place, and which are better positioned to take the lead. Building upon theories and past research into press-government relations, comparative politics, and an economic perspective on journalist-source relations, three groups of hypotheses on a personal, party, and political system level are derived and tested using a unique survey with members of parliament (MPs) in five democratic corporatist countries (Belgium, The Netherlands, Sweden, Norway, Denmark). The results display a similar pattern in all five countries where parliamentary experience and institutional position increase the frequency of contacts that MPs have with journalists. While these party variables have a more modest influence on the frequency of contacts, it is also shown that there are clear differences between countries attributed to parliament size in general and higher inter-MP competition in particular.

Keywords
press-politics relations; media power; members of parliament
National Category
Media and Communications
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-9944 (URN)10.1080/10584609.2010.496711 (DOI)000280677500005 ()2-s2.0-77955357223 (Scopus ID)DEMICOM (Local ID)DEMICOM (Archive number)DEMICOM (OAI)
Note

Correction in Vol 27(4) p 484-484 DOI 10.1080/10584609.2010.520635

Available from: 2009-09-30 Created: 2009-09-30 Last updated: 2017-12-13Bibliographically approved
5. Marking Journalistic Independence: Official Dominance and the Rule of Product Substitution in Swedish Press Coverage
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Marking Journalistic Independence: Official Dominance and the Rule of Product Substitution in Swedish Press Coverage
2010 (English)In: European Journal of Communication, ISSN 0267-3231, E-ISSN 1460-3705, Vol. 25, no 2, p. 123-137Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Independence and autonomy from political power are core values among professional journalists in most western societies. At the same time, research has shown that news media organizations are highly dependent on official political actors for the construction of news. The purpose of this study is to analyze the nature of official dominance and manifestations of news media independence in routine political press coverage in Sweden. Building upon three related theories of news media behavior – the indexing hypotheses, the dynamics of event-driven news, and the rule of product substitution – a set of hypotheses is derived and tested using a content analysis of 835 news stories published in Dagens Nyheter and Svenska Dagbladet during a 15-week period in 2008. While official actors dominate news coverage both in terms of source use and story initiation, evidence for a rule of product substitution is found.

Keywords
indexing; news coverage; official dominance; rule of product substitution; Sweden
National Category
Media and Communications
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-9942 (URN)10.1177/0267323110363654 (DOI)000278664800001 ()2-s2.0-78049323357 (Scopus ID)DEMICOM (Local ID)DEMICOM (Archive number)DEMICOM (OAI)
Available from: 2009-09-30 Created: 2009-09-30 Last updated: 2017-12-13Bibliographically approved
6. Facing the Muhammad Cartoons: Official Dominance and Event-Driven News in Swedish and American Elite Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Facing the Muhammad Cartoons: Official Dominance and Event-Driven News in Swedish and American Elite Press
2007 (English)In: Harvard Internation Journal of Press/Politics, ISSN 1081-180X, E-ISSN 1531-328X, Vol. 12, no 4, p. 131-153Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Past research has shown that official actors have an advantagewhen it comes to accessing and framing political issues in thenews media. This study examines the dynamics of official dominanceand event-driven news from a comparative perspective, focusingon the Muhammad cartoons controversy. A model of official dominanceand event-driven news, taking media system factors into account,is developed and tested using a quantitative and qualitativeresearch design. The results show that an intolerance framedominated over a freedom-of-speech frame in both the Swedishand the American elite press. Furthermore, although dramaticevents opened windows of opportunity for unofficial actors,the consequences of intensified coverage for the ratio betweenunofficial and official voices were more profound in the UnitedStates. Finally, there is some evidence of more active journalisticframing in the Swedish papers.

National Category
Media and Communications
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-7241 (URN)10.1177/1081180X07307869 (DOI)000249870800007 ()2-s2.0-34548780290 (Scopus ID)DEMICOM (Local ID)DEMICOM (Archive number)DEMICOM (OAI)
Available from: 2008-12-02 Created: 2008-11-30 Last updated: 2017-12-14Bibliographically approved

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