miun.sePublications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Pre-exposure to hyperoxic air does not enhance power output during subsequent sprint cycling
Institute of Training Science and Sport Informatics, German Sport University, Köln, Germany.
Outpatient Clinic for Sports Traumatology and Public Health Consultation, Köln, Germany.
German Research Centre of Elite Sport, Am Sportpark Müngersdorf, 50933 Köln, Germany.
Institute of Training Science and Sport Informatics, German Sport University, Köln, Germany.
Show others and affiliations
2010 (English)In: European Journal of Applied Physiology, ISSN 1439-6319, E-ISSN 1439-6327, Vol. 110, no 2, p. 301-305Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Previous studies have indicated that aerobic pathways contribute to 13-27% of the energy consumed during short-term (10-20-second) sprinting exercise. Accordingly, the present investigation was designed to test the hypothesis that prior breathing of oxygen-enriched air (FinO2=60%) would enhance power output and reduce fatigue during subsequent sprint cycling. Ten well-trained male cyclists (mean ± SD, age: 25±3 years, height: 186.1±6.9 cm, body mass: 79.1±8.2 kg, maximal oxygen uptake [VO2max]: 63.2±5.2 ml·kg-1·min-1) took 25 breaths of either hyperoxic (HE) or normoxic (NO) air before performing 15 sec of cycling at maximal exertion. During this performance, the maximal and mean power outputs were recorded. The concentration of lactate, pH, partial pressure of and saturation by oxygen, [H+] and base excess in arterial blood were assessed before and after the sprint. The maximal (1053±141 W for HE versus 1052±165 W for NO; P = 0.77) and mean power outputs (873±123 versus 876±147 W; P = 0.68) did not differ between the two conditions. The partial pressure of oxygen was approximately 2.3-fold higher after inhaling HE in comparison to NO, while lactate concentration, pH, [H+] and base excess (best P = 0.32) after sprinting were not influenced by exposure to HE. These findings suggest that the peak and mean power outputs of athletes performing short-term intense exercise cannot be improved by pre-exposure to oxygen-enriched air.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2010. Vol. 110, no 2, p. 301-305
Keywords [en]
Cycling; Hyperoxia; Lactate; Maximum power output; Sprint
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences Physiology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-10866DOI: 10.1007/s00421-010-1507-6ISI: 000281380800009Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-77956619418OAI: oai:DiVA.org:miun-10866DiVA, id: diva2:284343
Projects
Integrative Human PhysiologyAvailable from: 2010-01-06 Created: 2010-01-06 Last updated: 2018-01-12Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full textScopus

Authority records BETA

Holmberg, Hans-Christer

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Holmberg, Hans-Christer
By organisation
Department of Health Sciences
In the same journal
European Journal of Applied Physiology
Sport and Fitness SciencesPhysiology

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 268 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf