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Andragogy and E.M.O.T.I.O.N.: 7 key factors of successful serious games
University of Macedonia, Thessaloniki, Greece.
University of South Wales, United Kingdom.
Volgograd State Technical University, Russia.
Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Computer and System science. (Forum för digitalisering (FoDi) , HEEL)
2018 (English)In: Proceedings of the 12th European Conference on Games Based Learning (ECGBL 2018) / [ed] Mélanie Ciussi, Sophia Antipolis, France: Academic Conferences and Publishing International Limited, 2018, Vol. 12, p. 371-378Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Digital games have the potential to create active and engaging learning environments, supporting problem-solving, and learning through practice. As educators struggle to motivate the learners in their classroom, games provide a great opportunity to enrich the education curriculum. Students nowadays are characterized as the “Nintendo Generation”, because they spend significant amounts of their everyday lives from a very young age interacting with the computers by playing games. However, using games for learning requires a rethinking of the learning objectives, another  model for ownership of tasks, complex structures for support of students, new ways of assessing students, and a host of technological integration issues that have to be undertaken. So, how might one create effective learning games?

Digital games are a deviation from the normal pedagogy.  They are instead embedded within the field of Andragogy. The main principle follows that the educational digital games encourage self-directness and independency.  Moreover, the Andragogy of educational digital games provides substance to the learning process through active experimentation.

Taking the above into consideration, this paper aims to introduce and elaborate on a holistic framework based on 7 key factors that should be considered in creating a successful serious game. This framework is named “E.M.O.T.I.O.N” and stands for “Engaging game”, “Motivation”, “Opportunity of mastery”, “Theme and story”, “Intriguing learning”, “Objectives” and “Natural flow between learning and fun”. “E.M.O.T.I.O.N” is a framework that underlines the necessity of not disassociating instructional content from emotional context. In other words, we should not create sterile bulleted lists of rules. We should not assume players make decisions about adhering to policy based on rational algorithms and not normal human emotions. We should not strip learning modules of humanity and replace it with policy, terminology, and models, but fill a player with emotions ranging from frustration to elation, from sadness to anger to enthusiastic happiness. Serious games should embrace and encourage human emotion. It would be a breath of fresh air if our learning modules borrowed from games and put the critical element of emotion back into learning. The main message of this paper is that humans are quite adept at recalling learning when the learning is tied to strong emotions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sophia Antipolis, France: Academic Conferences and Publishing International Limited, 2018. Vol. 12, p. 371-378
Series
European Conference on Games Based Learning, ISSN 2049-0992, E-ISSN 2049-100X ; 12
Keywords [en]
Game-based learning, Creativity, Model of learning, Game Design, Andragogy
National Category
Didactics
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-34685ISI: 000453557800044Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85058958585OAI: oai:DiVA.org:miun-34685DiVA, id: diva2:1254245
Conference
ECGBL 2018, SKEMA Business Sch, FRANCE, OCT 04-05, 2018
Available from: 2018-10-08 Created: 2018-10-08 Last updated: 2019-01-09Bibliographically approved

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