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Improving strength and power in trained athletes with 3 weeks of occlusion training
United Kingdom Sports Council, London, United Kingdom .
Exercise and Medicine Research Centre, Swansea University, Swansea, United Kingdom .
Mittuniversitetet, Fakulteten för humanvetenskap, Avdelningen för hälsovetenskap. (Swedish Winter Sports Research Centre)
2014 (engelsk)Inngår i: International Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance, ISSN 1555-0265, E-ISSN 1555-0273, Vol. 9, nr 1, s. 166-172Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: To examine the effects of moderate-load exercise with and without blood-flow restriction (BFR) on strength, power, and repeated-sprint ability, along with acute and chronic salivary hormonal parameters. Methods: Twenty male semiprofessional rugby union athletes were randomized to a lower-body BFR intervention (an occlusion cuff inflated to 180 mmHg worn intermittently on the proximal thighs) or a control intervention that trained without occlusion in a crossover design. Experimental sessions were performed 3 times a week for 3 wk with 5 sets of 5 repetitions of bench press, leg squat, and pull-ups performed at 70% of 1-repetition maximum. Results: Greater improvements were observed (occlusion training vs control) in bench press (5.4 ± 2.6 vs 3.3 ± 1.4 kg), squat (7.8 ± 2.1 vs 4.3 ± 1.4 kg), maximum sprint time (-0.03 ± 0.03 vs -0.01 ± 0.02 s), and leg power (168 ± 105 vs 68 ± 50 W). Greater exercise-induced salivary testosterone (ES 0.84-0.61) and cortisol responses (ES 0.65-0.20) were observed after the occlusion intervention sessions compared with the nonoccluded controls; however, the acute cortisol increases were attenuated across the training block. Conclusions: Occlusion training can potentially improve the rate of strength-training gains and fatigue resistance in trained athletes, possibly allowing greater gains from lower loading that could be of benefit during high training loads, in competitive seasons, or in a rehabilitative setting. The clear improvement in bench-press strength resulting from lower-body occlusion suggests a systemic effect of BFR training. © 2014 Human Kinetics, Inc.

sted, utgiver, år, opplag, sider
2014. Vol. 9, nr 1, s. 166-172
Emneord [en]
Blood-flow restriction, Cortisol, Testosterone, Training adaptation
HSV kategori
Identifikatorer
URN: urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-21353DOI: 10.1123/IJSPP.2013-0018ISI: 000333364200025Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84892925225OAI: oai:DiVA.org:miun-21353DiVA, id: diva2:697416
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Language of Original Document: English

Tilgjengelig fra: 2014-02-18 Laget: 2014-02-18 Sist oppdatert: 2017-12-06bibliografisk kontrollert

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