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Englund, Oskar
Publications (10 of 42) Show all publications
Englund, O., Börjesson, P., Berndes, G., Scarlat, N., Dallemand, J.-F., Grizzetti, B., . . . Fahl, F. (2020). Beneficial land use change: Strategic expansion of new biomass plantations can reduce environmental impacts from EU agriculture. Global Environmental Change, 60, Article ID 101990.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Beneficial land use change: Strategic expansion of new biomass plantations can reduce environmental impacts from EU agriculture
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2020 (English)In: Global Environmental Change, ISSN 0959-3780, E-ISSN 1872-9495, Vol. 60, article id 101990Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Society faces the double challenge of increasing biomass production to meet the future demands for food, materials and bioenergy, while addressing negative impacts of current (and future) land use. In the discourse, land use change (LUC) has often been considered as negative, referring to impacts of deforestation and expansion of biomass plantations. However, strategic establishment of suitable perennial production systems in agricultural landscapes can mitigate environmental impacts of current crop production, while providing biomass for the bioeconomy. Here, we explore the potential for such “beneficial LUC” in EU28. First, we map and quantify the degree of accumulated soil organic carbon losses, soil loss by wind and water erosion, nitrogen emissions to water, and recurring floods, in ∼81.000 individual landscapes in EU28. We then estimate the effectiveness in mitigating these impacts through establishment of perennial plants, in each landscape. The results indicate that there is a substantial potential for effective impact mitigation. Depending on criteria selection, 10–46% of the land used for annual crop production in EU28 is located in landscapes that could be considered priority areas for beneficial LUC. These areas are scattered all over Europe, but there are notable “hot-spots” where priority areas are concentrated, e.g., large parts of Denmark, western UK, The Po valley in Italy, and the Danube basin. While some policy developments support beneficial LUC, implementation could benefit from attempts to realize synergies between different Sustainable Development Goals, e.g., “Zero hunger”, “Clean water and sanitation”, “Affordable and Clean Energy”, “Climate Action”, and “Life on Land”.

Keywords
Bioenergy, Perennial crops, Multifunctional production systems, Land use, Biomass, environmental impacts, agriculture
National Category
Environmental Sciences related to Agriculture and Land-use Renewable Bioenergy Research Soil Science Agricultural Science Environmental Sciences Geosciences, Multidisciplinary
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-38179 (URN)10.1016/j.gloenvcha.2019.101990 (DOI)2-s2.0-85075711014 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Energy Agency, P48364-1
Available from: 2020-01-08 Created: 2020-01-08 Last updated: 2020-01-10Bibliographically approved
Englund, O., Börjesson, P., Berndes, G., Scarlat, N., Dallemand, J.-F., Grizzetti, B., . . . Fahl, F. (2019). Beneficial land use change: Strategic expansion of new biomass plantations can reduce environmental impacts from EU agriculture. EarthArXiv
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Beneficial land use change: Strategic expansion of new biomass plantations can reduce environmental impacts from EU agriculture
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2019 (English)Other (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Society faces the double challenge of addressing negative impacts of current land use, while increasing biomass production to meet the future demands for food, materials and bioenergy. Potential impacts of increasing the biomass supply are subject to debate. In the discourse, land use change (LUC) has often been considered as negative, referring to impacts of deforestation and cropland expansion. At the same time, LUC is considered necessary for mitigating impacts of existing land use. Strategic establishment of suitable crop cultivation systems in agricultural landscapes can mitigate environmental impacts of current crop production, while providing biomass for the bioeconomy. Here, we explore the potential for such “beneficial LUC” in EU28, based on high-resolution land use modeling. First, we map and quantify the degree of accumulated soil organic carbon losses, wind and water erosion, nitrogen emissions to water, and recurring flooding, in ~81.000 individual sub-watersheds in EU28. We then estimate the effectiveness in mitigating these impacts through establishment of perennial plants, in each sub-watershed. Finally, we identify areas where perennialization may be particularly beneficial from an environmental point of view. The results indicate that there is a substantial potential for effective mitigation, regarding all the assessed impacts. Depending on criteria selection, some 10-46% of the land used for annual crop production in EU28 is located in landscapes that could be considered priority areas for beneficial LUC. While some recent policy development is favorable for promoting beneficial LUC, the effectiveness could be increased by seeking synergies between climate change mitigation, energy security, and other societal goals. One way forward can be to identify and promote options for biomass production in the context of SDG implementation.

Place, publisher, year, pages
EarthArXiv, 2019
Keywords
Land use, LULUCF, CAP, biomass, environmental impacts, perennial crops, spatial planning
National Category
Other Environmental Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-37248 (URN)10.31223/osf.io/4h9dg (DOI)
Note

Preprint in EarthArXiv, March 17, 2019

Available from: 2019-09-18 Created: 2019-09-18 Last updated: 2019-09-27Bibliographically approved
Vogt, M. & Englund, O. (2019). Biodiversity outcomes associated with sustainability certifications: Contextualising understanding and expectations, and allowing for ambitious intentions. In: Melissa Vogt (Ed.), Sustainability Certification Schemes in the Agricultural and Natural Resource Sectors: Outcomes for Society and the Environment (pp. 65-92). Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Biodiversity outcomes associated with sustainability certifications: Contextualising understanding and expectations, and allowing for ambitious intentions
2019 (English)In: Sustainability Certification Schemes in the Agricultural and Natural Resource Sectors: Outcomes for Society and the Environment / [ed] Melissa Vogt, Routledge, 2019, p. 65-92Chapter in book (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2019
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-37251 (URN)2-s2.0-85072720501 (Scopus ID)978-1-138-57297-3 (ISBN)
Available from: 2019-09-18 Created: 2019-09-18 Last updated: 2019-11-14Bibliographically approved
Hansson, J., Berndes, G., Englund, O., Mazzaro de Freitas, F. L. & Sparovek, G. (2019). How is biodiversity protection influencing the potential for bioenergy feedstock production on grasslands?. Global Change Biology Bioenergy, 11(3), 517-538
Open this publication in new window or tab >>How is biodiversity protection influencing the potential for bioenergy feedstock production on grasslands?
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2019 (English)In: Global Change Biology Bioenergy, ISSN 1757-1693, E-ISSN 1757-1707, Vol. 11, no 3, p. 517-538Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Sustainable feedstock supply is a critical issue for the bioenergy sector. One concern is that feedstock production will impact biodiversity. We analyze how this concern is addressed in assessments of biomass supply potentials and in selected governance systems in the EU and Brazil, including the EU Renewable Energy Directive (RED), the EU Common Agricultural Policy (CAP), and the Brazilian Forest Act. The analysis focuses on grasslands and includes estimates of the amount of grassland area (and corresponding biomass production volume) that would be excluded from cultivation in specific biodiversity protection scenarios. The reviewed assessments used a variety of approaches to identify and exclude biodiverse grasslands as unavailable for bioenergy. Because exclusion was integrated with other nature protection considerations, quantification of excluded grassland areas was often not possible. The RED complements and strengthens the CAP in terms of biodiversity protection. Following the RED, an estimated 39%-48% (about 9-11 Mha) and 15%-54% (about 10-38 Mha) of natural and non-natural grassland, respectively, may be considered highly biodiverse in EU-28. The estimated biomass production potential on these areas corresponds to some 1-3 and 1.5-10 EJ/year for natural and non-natural grassland, respectively (depending on area availability and management intensity). However, the RED lacks clear definitions and guidance, creating uncertainty about its influence on grassland availability for bioenergy feedstock production. For Brazil, an estimated 16%-77% (about 16-76 Mha) and 1%-32% (about 7-24 Mha) of natural and non-natural grassland, respectively, may be considered highly biodiverse. In Brazil, ecological-economic zoning was found potentially important for grassland protection. Further clarification of grassland definitions and delineation in regulations will facilitate a better understanding of the prospects for bioenergy feedstock production on grasslands, and the impacts of bioenergy deployment on biodiversity.

Keywords
biodiversity, biofuel, biomass potential, Brazil, EU, grassland, pasture, protection, sustainability criteria
National Category
Other Environmental Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-37235 (URN)10.1111/gcbb.12568 (DOI)000459480300004 ()2-s2.0-85054913588 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20190811

Available from: 2019-03-11 Created: 2019-09-18 Last updated: 2020-01-21Bibliographically approved
Cintas, O., Berndes, G., Englund, O., Cutz, L. & Johnsson, F. (2018). Geospatial supply-demand modeling of biomass residues for co-firing in European coal power plants. Global Change Biology Bioenergy, 10(11), 786-803
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Geospatial supply-demand modeling of biomass residues for co-firing in European coal power plants
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2018 (English)In: Global Change Biology Bioenergy, ISSN 1757-1693, E-ISSN 1757-1707, Vol. 10, no 11, p. 786-803Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Biomass co-firing with coal is a near-term option to displace fossil fuels and can facilitate the development of biomass conversion and the build-out of biomass supply infrastructure. A GIS-based modeling framework (EU-28, Norway, and Switzerland) is used to quantify and localize biomass demand for co-firing in coal power plants and agricultural and forest residue supply potentials; supply and demand are then matched based on minimizing the total biomass transport costs (field to gate). Key datasets (e.g., land cover, land use, and wood production) are available at 1,000m or higher resolution, while some data (e.g., simulated yields) and assumptions (e.g., crop harvest index) have lower resolution and were resampled to allow modeling at 1,000m resolution. Biomass demand for co-firing is estimated at 184 PJ in 2020, corresponding to an emission reduction of 18Mt CO2. In all countries except Italy and Spain, the sum of the forest and agricultural residues available at less than 300km from a co-firing plant exceeds the assessed biomass demand. The total cost of transporting residues to these plants is reduced if agricultural residues can be used, as transport distances are shorter. The total volume of forest residues less than 300km from a co-firing plant corresponds to about half of the assessed biomass demand. Almost 70% of the total biomass demand for co-firing is found in Germany and Poland. The volumes of domestic forest residues in Germany (Poland) available within the cost range 2-5 (1.5-3.5) Euro/GJ biomass correspond to about 30% (70%) of the biomass demand. The volumes of domestic forest and agricultural residues in Germany (Poland) within the cost range 2-4 (below 2) Euro/GJ biomass exceed the biomass demand for co-firing. Half of the biomass demand is located within 50km from ports, indicating that long-distance biomass transport by sea is in many instances an option.

Keywords
agriculture; bioenergy; CO2 emissions; co-firing; European Union; forestry; geographic information system; residues
National Category
Other Environmental Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-37238 (URN)10.1111/gcbb.12532 (DOI)
Available from: 2019-09-18 Created: 2019-09-18 Last updated: 2019-09-18Bibliographically approved
Englund, O., Berndes, G., Cederberg, C. & Börjesson, P. (2018). How to Analyse Ecosystem Services in Landscapes. International Energy Agency (IEA)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>How to Analyse Ecosystem Services in Landscapes
2018 (English)Report (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
International Energy Agency (IEA), 2018
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-37276 (URN)
Available from: 2019-09-20 Created: 2019-09-20 Last updated: 2019-09-20Bibliographically approved
Freitas, F. L. M., Englund, O., Sparovek, G., Berndes, G., Guidotti, V., Pinto, L. F. G. & Mörtberg, U. (2018). Legal protection over the Brazilian carbon stocks. In: : . Paper presented at 1st Latin American Conference on Sustainable Development of Energy, Water and Environment Systems (SDEWES), 28-31 January 2018 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Legal protection over the Brazilian carbon stocks
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2018 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Brazilian native vegetation stands as one of the largest global carbon storages.  Here is also where most of the emissions related to land use change take place,  mostly driven by agricultural expansion. Policies of incentives and support to  avoid deforestation are expected to play a significant role to improve the  effectiveness of the prevailing command and control regulation and expand the  protection of carbon stocks in the native vegetation. However, the limited  available resources require wise targeting policies that maximise the outcomes  regarding carbon protection. In this study, we conducted a quantitative  assessment of the effect of command and control regulations in the protection of  above-ground carbon (AGC) stocks employing a land use policy assessment (LUPA)  model. The model enabled the construction of a land tenure dataset of national  coverage and modelled the effects of the major pieces of land use legislation in  the protection of AGC stocks. The outcomes suggest that roughly 70% of the AGC  stock in Brazil is protected and additional 20% is expected to be protected  after the tenure regularisation process of undesignated land. Private territory  sustains about 30% of the AGC stocks, half within small or medium sized private  properties which represent 98% of the Brazilian landholders and the other half  in the 2% larger properties. Roughly 20% of the AGC in private land is under  command and control protection, and the remaining 10% is unprotected. We argued  that targeting policy may prioritise the unprotected AGC stocks; however,  different biomes may require different policy settings considering the  specificity of each biome.

National Category
Environmental Sciences
Research subject
Land and Water Resources Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-37258 (URN)
Conference
1st Latin American Conference on Sustainable Development of Energy, Water and Environment Systems (SDEWES), 28-31 January 2018 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
Funder
StandUp
Note

QC 20180212

Available from: 2018-02-08 Created: 2019-09-18 Last updated: 2019-09-18Bibliographically approved
Dimitriou, I., Berndes, G., Englund, O., Brown, M., Busch, G., Dale, V., . . . Tyler, D. (2018). Lignocellulosic crops in agricultural landscapes: production systems for biomass and other environmental benefits - examples, incentives, and barriers. International Energy Agency (IEA)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Lignocellulosic crops in agricultural landscapes: production systems for biomass and other environmental benefits - examples, incentives, and barriers
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2018 (English)Report (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
International Energy Agency (IEA), 2018
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-37275 (URN)
Available from: 2019-09-20 Created: 2019-09-20 Last updated: 2019-09-20Bibliographically approved
Freitas, F. L., Sparovek, G., Berndes, G., Persson, M., Englund, O., Baretto, A. & Mörtberg, U. (2018). Potential increase of legal deforestation in Brazilian Amazon after Forest Act revision. Nature Sustainability, 1(11), 665-670
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Potential increase of legal deforestation in Brazilian Amazon after Forest Act revision
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2018 (English)In: Nature Sustainability, E-ISSN 2398-9629, Vol. 1, no 11, p. 665-670Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The Brazilian Amazon rainforest is protected largely by command and control regulation of public and private land. The Brazilian Forest Act requires private landholders within the Amazon to set aside 80% of their land as legal reserves for nature protection, but this requirement can be reduced to 50% if more than 65% of a state’s territory is protected public land (for example, public conservation units and indigenous reserves). In the ongoing land designation process in Brazil, some Amazonian states may cross this 65% threshold. We assess the potential reduction in the legal reserve requirement from 80% to 50%, through spatially explicit modelling of scenarios concerning land tenure consolidation, employing up-to-date databases on land ownership. Depending on the outcome of land designation processes and political priorities, some 6.5–15.4 million hectares of private land previously protected as legal reserves may become available for legal deforestation. While protection of public land is crucial for safeguarding the Amazon, revisions of federal and state legislation may be needed to avoid the further extension of protected public land triggering increased legal deforestation on private lands. Zero-deforestation commitments and other initiatives may mitigate impacts in the absence of such revision.

National Category
Environmental Sciences
Research subject
Land and Water Resources Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-35854 (URN)10.1038/s41893-018-0171-4 (DOI)000450118100012 ()2-s2.0-85056455572 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-11-07 Created: 2019-03-25 Last updated: 2019-03-25Bibliographically approved
Berndes, G., Cederberg, C., Cintas Sanchez, O., Englund, O., Börjesson, P. & Olofsson, J. (2018). Sustainable biofuels: critical review of current views and case studies using extended systems analysis providing new perspectives and positive examples. Gothenburg: f3 – Svenskt kunskapscentrum för förnybara drivmedel
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sustainable biofuels: critical review of current views and case studies using extended systems analysis providing new perspectives and positive examples
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2018 (English)Report (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Gothenburg: f3 – Svenskt kunskapscentrum för förnybara drivmedel, 2018
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-37272 (URN)
Available from: 2019-09-20 Created: 2019-09-20 Last updated: 2019-09-20Bibliographically approved
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