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Pudney, Eric
Publications (6 of 6) Show all publications
Pudney, E. (2019). Scepticism and Belief in Witchcraft Drama, 1538-1681. Lund: Lund University Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Scepticism and Belief in Witchcraft Drama, 1538-1681
2019 (English)Book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lund: Lund University Press, 2019. p. 355
Keywords
witchcraft, demonology, scepticism, belief, magic, The Witch of Edmonton, The Late Lancashire Witches, The Lancashire Witches, Macbeth, Dr Faustus
National Category
Humanities and the Arts Specific Literatures
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-37226 (URN)978-9-1983-7686-9 (ISBN)9789198376876 (ISBN)
Available from: 2019-09-16 Created: 2019-09-16 Last updated: 2019-11-14Bibliographically approved
Pudney, E. (2016). Scepticism and Belief in Witchcraft Drama, 1538-1681. (Doctoral dissertation). Lunds Universitet
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Scepticism and Belief in Witchcraft Drama, 1538-1681
2016 (English)Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lunds Universitet, 2016
National Category
Specific Literatures
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-34424 (URN)
Available from: 2018-09-19 Created: 2018-09-17 Last updated: 2018-09-19Bibliographically approved
Pudney, E. (2015). Christianity and Cormac McCarthy's The Road. English Studies: A Journal of English Language, 96(3), 293-309
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Christianity and Cormac McCarthy's The Road
2015 (English)In: English Studies: A Journal of English Language, ISSN 0013-838X, E-ISSN 1744-4217, Vol. 96, no 3, p. 293-309Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Cormac McCarthy's The Road takes place not before or during but after the end. The novel follows a man and his son as they seek to survive in what remains of the world after some unspecified cataclysmic event. There is almost nothing left: no society, no food, no animals, no hope. Many readers will feel that the question the novel poses is why anyone would wish to continue living under such circumstances. But although that question might be more urgent post-apocalypse, it is in fact one that can always be asked: what, if anything, makes human life valuable and worthwhile? The novel provides answers to these questions, but these answers are contradictory. The reader is left with a choice between powerful arguments for both faith and despair. In The Road, hope is associated with Christianity and hopelessness with an atheistic understanding of the world. Nonetheless, the novel makes it clear that faith is no easy option. This article will begin by discussing the importance of Christian imagery in the novel, focusing on the key symbolic dimensions of fire and darkness, before going on to show how both Christian and atheistic readings are not only made possible, but actively put forward by the text. It will be argued that the novel presents a powerful challenge to both Christian and atheistic views of the world, without ever actually rejecting either.

National Category
Specific Literatures
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-34422 (URN)10.1080/0013838X.2014.996383 (DOI)
Available from: 2018-09-17 Created: 2018-09-17 Last updated: 2018-09-18Bibliographically approved
Pudney, E. (2015). Mendacity and Kingship in Shakespeare's Henry V and Richard III. European Journal of English Studies, 19(2), 163-175
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Mendacity and Kingship in Shakespeare's Henry V and Richard III
2015 (English)In: European Journal of English Studies, ISSN 1382-5577, E-ISSN 1744-4233, Vol. 19, no 2, p. 163-175Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Shakespeare’s Henry V and Richard III both practise mendacity, but while Henry V celebrates Henry’s capacity for deceit, the king’s lies are condemned in Richard III. The plays show how similar patterns of behaviour in early modern England could be represented as either virtuous or evil by means of rhetoric, while the similar behaviour of the two kings suggests a broad awareness of the necessity of deceit as a political skill. These two plays also draw attention to their own rhetorical distortions in ways which have appeared troubling to many modern critics, but which exemplify humanist ideas about education through rhetorical ‘lies’.

Keywords
Shakespeare, mendacity, kingship, humanist writers, Richard III, Henry V, early modern political theory, history plays
National Category
Specific Literatures
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-34423 (URN)10.1080/13825577.2015.1039279 (DOI)
Available from: 2018-09-17 Created: 2018-09-17 Last updated: 2018-09-18Bibliographically approved
Pudney, E. (2014). Chorus and Stance in Early Modern English Drama. In: Subjectivity and Epistemicity: Corpus, Discourse, and Literary Approaches to Stance. Lunds Universitet
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Chorus and Stance in Early Modern English Drama
2014 (English)In: Subjectivity and Epistemicity: Corpus, Discourse, and Literary Approaches to Stance, Lunds Universitet , 2014Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lunds Universitet, 2014
National Category
Specific Literatures
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-34425 (URN)
Available from: 2018-09-17 Created: 2018-09-17 Last updated: 2018-09-18Bibliographically approved
Pudney, E. (2012). Paradox and the Preface to The Picture of Dorian Gray. The Wildean (40)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Paradox and the Preface to The Picture of Dorian Gray
2012 (English)In: The Wildean, no 40Article in journal (Refereed) Published
National Category
Specific Literatures
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-34426 (URN)
Available from: 2018-09-17 Created: 2018-09-17 Last updated: 2018-09-18Bibliographically approved
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