miun.sePublications
Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
BETA
Eivergård, Kristina
Publications (2 of 2) Show all publications
Eivergård, K., Enmarker, I., Livholts, M., Aléx, L. & Hellzén, O. (2019). The Importance of Being Acceptable: Psychiatric Staffs’ Talk about Women Patients in Forensic Care. Issues in Mental Health Nursing, 40(2), 124-132
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Importance of Being Acceptable: Psychiatric Staffs’ Talk about Women Patients in Forensic Care
Show others...
2019 (English)In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 40, no 2, p. 124-132Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Currently, women comprise about ten percent of those sentenced to psychiatric forensic clinics in Sweden. Those who are sentenced to forensic care because of offending and violent behaviour have already taken a step away from the usually expected female behaviour. On the other hand, there are many women in forensic care who have not committed crimes, but who instead selfharm. Studies have identified a gender bias in diagnosing and care in psychiatric settings, but there are few studies conducted on women in forensic care. The present study therefore examined how the situation of women patients and female norms are expressed in the staff’s talk about these women during verbal handovers and ward rounds at a forensic clinic in Sweden. The aim was to explore how psychiatric staff, in a context of verbal handovers and ward rounds, talk about women who have been committed to forensic psychiatric care, and what consequences this might have for the care of the patients. The content of speech was examined using audio recordings and a method of analysis that was inspired by thematic analysis. The analysis identified that the staff talked about the women in a way that indicates that they expected the women to follow the rules and take responsibility for their bodies in order to be regarded as acceptable patients.                        

National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-35074 (URN)10.1080/01612840.2018.1514551 (DOI)000463571900006 ()30481089 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85057627205 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-12-06 Created: 2018-12-06 Last updated: 2019-05-22Bibliographically approved
Eivergård, K., Enmarker, I. & Hellzen, O. (2016). The Talk About the Psychiatric Patient. Issues in Mental Health Nursing, 37(10), 756-764
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Talk About the Psychiatric Patient
2016 (English)In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 37, no 10, p. 756-764Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Essential to psychiatric nursing practice and care, verbal handovers and ward rounds are reporting systems for communication that shapes psychiatric staff's ability to recognize, understand, and construct patients, as well as patients' ability to construct themselves. Given the centrality of such language in psychiatric practice, the aim of this study was to describe how psychiatric staff talk about patients in psychiatric wards, what their talk encompasses, and what consequences it might pose for patient care. Empirical data were collected from audio recordings of staff discussions of patients during nine verbal handovers and three ward rounds in six different general psychiatric wards in mid and southern Sweden. Findings showed that to describe patients' mood, characteristics, and behavior, nurses used culturally common words and concepts related to three themes-good patients, bad patients, and to stay or be discharged-and six subthemes-looking well, looking poorly, desirable patients, undesirable patients, continuing work, and being discharged. However, since assessments of and decisions about patients' conditions and care used everyday language and did not involve patients' participation, opportunities for patients to participate in their own care were rare.

National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-29554 (URN)10.1080/01612840.2016.1206153 (DOI)000388646100008 ()27463829 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84979995862 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-12-14 Created: 2016-12-14 Last updated: 2017-11-29Bibliographically approved
Organisations

Search in DiVA

Show all publications