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Champoux-Larsson, Marie-FranceORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-7251-5263
Publications (10 of 15) Show all publications
Champoux-Larsson, M.-F. & Dylman, A. (2019). A prosodic bias, not an advantage, in bilinguals' interpretation of emotional prosody. Bilingualism: Language and Cognition, 22(2), 416-424
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A prosodic bias, not an advantage, in bilinguals' interpretation of emotional prosody
2019 (English)In: Bilingualism: Language and Cognition, ISSN 1366-7289, E-ISSN 1469-1841, Vol. 22, no 2, p. 416-424Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A bilingual advantage has been found in prosody understanding in pre-school children. To understand this advantage better, we asked 73 children (6-8 years) to identify the emotional valence of spoken words, based on either semantics or emotional prosody (which were either consistent or discrepant with each other). Bilingual experience ranged from no to equal exposure to and use of two languages. Both age and bilingual experience predicted accurate identification of prosody, particularly for trials where the semantics were discrepant with the targeted prosody. Bilingual experience, but not age, predicted a prosodic bias, meaning that participants had more difficulty ignoring the irrelevant discrepant prosody when the task was to identify the semantics of the word. The decline of a semantic bias was predicted by age and bilingual experience together. Our results suggest that previous findings on the bilingual advantage in prosody processing may in fact be driven by a prosodic bias.

Keywords
semantic bias, prosodic bias, developmental differences, bilingualism
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-33708 (URN)10.1017/S1366728918000640 (DOI)000461558600012 ()
Available from: 2018-06-05 Created: 2018-06-05 Last updated: 2019-05-20Bibliographically approved
Champoux-Larsson, M.-F. & Dylman, A. (2019). Bilinguals’ use of semantic and prosodic cues for emotion inference in speech. In: : . Paper presented at XIV International Symposium of Psycholinguistics, Tarragona, Spain, 10-13 April, 2019.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Bilinguals’ use of semantic and prosodic cues for emotion inference in speech
2019 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Recently, a study by Champoux-Larsson and Dylman (2018) showed that the bilingual advantage previously found in the use of emotional prosodic cues in children to infer a speaker’s emotional state (e.g., Yow & Markman, 2011) was driven by a bias towards prosody. Namely, the higher level of bilingualism the participants in ChampouxLarsson and Dylman (2018) had, the more they had difficulty ignoring prosodic emotional cues in spoken words even when they were asked to focus on the semantics of the words. While Misono et al. (1997) found that monolingual adults rely on both semantic and prosodic cues to determine emotion in speech equally, it is not known yet whether this also is true for bilingual adults. In other words, it is unclear whether the prosodic bias found in bilingual children withstands even in adulthood for bilinguals. Thus, we present a study where adults with varying levels of bilingualism were asked to determine the emotional valence of utterances based on the participant’s general impression (i.e., without specifying which cue to use), based on the utterance’s emotional prosody or based on its semantic content. The spoken words’ semantics was positive, negative or neutral and the words were uttered with either a congruent emotional prosody or with an incongruent emotional prosody. Data is currently being prepared for analysis and results will be available within the coming weeks.

Keywords
emotional prosody, prosodic bias, bilingualism, emotion
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-36022 (URN)
Conference
XIV International Symposium of Psycholinguistics, Tarragona, Spain, 10-13 April, 2019
Available from: 2019-04-19 Created: 2019-04-19 Last updated: 2019-06-19Bibliographically approved
Champoux-Larsson, M.-F. & Dylman, A. (2019). Different measurements of bilingualism and their effect on performance on a Simon task.. In: : . Paper presented at Capturing and Quantifying Individual Differences in Bilingualism, Tromsø, Norway, September 2nd-3rd, 2019.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Different measurements of bilingualism and their effect on performance on a Simon task.
2019 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Refereed)
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-37201 (URN)
Conference
Capturing and Quantifying Individual Differences in Bilingualism, Tromsø, Norway, September 2nd-3rd, 2019
Available from: 2019-09-12 Created: 2019-09-12 Last updated: 2019-09-16Bibliographically approved
Champoux-Larsson, M.-F., Dylman, A., Örnkloo, H. & Esteves, F. (2019). Identification of facial expressions of emotion by 4-year-old children from different linguistic environments. International Journal of Bilingualism, 23(5), 1208-1219
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Identification of facial expressions of emotion by 4-year-old children from different linguistic environments
2019 (English)In: International Journal of Bilingualism, ISSN 1367-0069, E-ISSN 1756-6878, Vol. 23, no 5, p. 1208-1219Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The current study investigated the identification of facial expressions of emotion, a socio-emotional task that has not previously been examined in children from different linguistic environments. Eighty-four 4-year-olds growing up in one of three linguistic environments (monolingual, dominant bilingual, balanced bilingual) performed a task where they identified facial expressions (happiness, anger, sadness, fear). Accuracy was analysed with a mixed-design analysis of variance using group (monolinguals, dominant bilinguals and balanced bilinguals) and emotion (happy, angry, sad and scared) as between- and within-group variables, respectively. Our results showed a main effect of emotion, but there was no main effect of group. This suggests that 4-year-olds’ linguistic environment does not affect performance on an identification of facial expressions task. This study was the first to investigate the identification of facial expressions of emotion in children coming from different linguistic environments. As the socio-emotional development of bilinguals is not yet well understood, especially regarding the visual perception of emotions, this study is amongst the first to contribute to this area of research. Our results are therefore of significance as a building block for additional studies that should explore the visual perception of emotions in other types of tasks and populations.

Keywords
Facial expression of emotion, socio-emotional development, linguistic environment, language exposure, emotion perception
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-33781 (URN)10.1177/1367006918781069 (DOI)000485962600020 ()2-s2.0-85048768132 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-06-14 Created: 2018-06-14 Last updated: 2019-11-12Bibliographically approved
Dylman, A. & Champoux-Larsson, M.-F. (2019). No foreign language effect in decision making for culturally influential second languages. In: : . Paper presented at International Convention of Psychological Science (ICPS 2019), Paris 7-9 March 2019.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>No foreign language effect in decision making for culturally influential second languages
2019 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

We report two experiments investigating the foreign language effect (FLe) for culturally influential languages. Across two experimental paradigms, we found no FLe for Swedish participants when using their second language English. This highlights the limitations of the FLe and suggests that it may not be as robust as previously thought.

National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-35792 (URN)
Conference
International Convention of Psychological Science (ICPS 2019), Paris 7-9 March 2019
Available from: 2019-03-14 Created: 2019-03-14 Last updated: 2019-03-19Bibliographically approved
Champoux-Larsson, M.-F., Dylman, A. & Esteves, F. (2018). Bilingualism and social flexibility. In: : . Paper presented at Social Communication Across the Lifespan, University of Kent, Canterbury, England, 27th-29th June, 2018.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Bilingualism and social flexibility
2018 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Refereed)
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-34043 (URN)
Conference
Social Communication Across the Lifespan, University of Kent, Canterbury, England, 27th-29th June, 2018
Available from: 2018-06-29 Created: 2018-06-29 Last updated: 2018-07-03Bibliographically approved
Champoux-Larsson, M.-F., Dylman, A. & Esteves, F. (2018). Bilinguals' social flexibility. In: : . Paper presented at International Conference on Bilingualism and Cognition, Pilani Goa Campus, India,November 1-3, 2018.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Bilinguals' social flexibility
2018 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-34848 (URN)
Conference
International Conference on Bilingualism and Cognition, Pilani Goa Campus, India,November 1-3, 2018
Available from: 2018-11-02 Created: 2018-11-02 Last updated: 2018-11-14Bibliographically approved
Champoux-Larsson, M.-F. (2018). Perceiving emotions with a bilingual mind. (Doctoral dissertation). Sundsvall: Mid Sweden University
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Perceiving emotions with a bilingual mind
2018 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sundsvall: Mid Sweden University, 2018. p. 101
Series
Mid Sweden University doctoral thesis, ISSN 1652-893X ; 289
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-34736 (URN)978-91-88527-75-2 (ISBN)
Public defence
2018-12-05, F234, Campus Östersund, Östersund, 10:00 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Note

Vid tidpunkten för disputationen var följande delarbete opublicerat: delarbete 3 (inskickat).

At the time of the doctoral defence the following paper was unpublished: paper 3 (submitted).

Available from: 2018-10-19 Created: 2018-10-18 Last updated: 2018-10-19Bibliographically approved
Dylman, A., Champoux-Larsson, M.-F. & Esteves, F. (2017). Gender differences in the generation of emotional words in children and adults. In: : . Paper presented at 13th International Symposium of Psycholinguistics, Braga, Portugal, April 5-8, 2017.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Gender differences in the generation of emotional words in children and adults
2017 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Studies have traditionally shown that there are differences between the number of words that men and women produce, where females generally produce more words than males. The same has been found for emotional words. However, it is unclear when during development, and why those differences arise. In order to understand this issue better, we replicated a study by Neshat Doost et al. (1999) on a Swedish population. Not only did we study emotional word generation in children (n = 127, age range 8-10 years) as in the original study by Neshat Doost et al. (1999), but we also tested an adult population (n = 183, mean age = 27.7 years) in order to compare different stages in life. Participants generated words based on ten categories, two of which were neutral, and eight of which were emotional categories, covering various aspects of happiness, sadness, and fear. Our results show similar gender differences in the targeted age groups. For the younger population, females produced more words than males in all emotional categories, but there was no difference in the neutral category. Similarly, in the adult population, women generated more words than men in most emotional categories, but no differences were found in the neutral categories. Overall, our results show no gender differences in word generation of neutral words for both the younger and the adult participants, but when it comes to the emotional categories, the female participants generated significantly more words than their male peers. This trend is observable even in children as young as 8-10 years, and persists into adulthood. Our results suggest that gender differences in amount of words generated is specific to, or at least more prominent for emotional words.

National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-32166 (URN)
Conference
13th International Symposium of Psycholinguistics, Braga, Portugal, April 5-8, 2017
Available from: 2017-11-27 Created: 2017-11-27 Last updated: 2017-11-28Bibliographically approved
Champoux-Larsson, M.-F., Dylman, A. & Esteves, F. (2017). Identification of facial expressions of emotion in bilingual children with different exposures to their languages. In: : . Paper presented at 13th International Symposium of Psycholinguistics, April 5-8, 2017.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Identification of facial expressions of emotion in bilingual children with different exposures to their languages
2017 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

We investigated the emotional development of bilingual children by measuring balanced and unbalanced 4-year-old bilinguals’ performance on an identification of emotional facial expressions task. A total of 84 children were divided into three groups: balanced bilinguals, unbalanced bilinguals, and monolinguals. Participants completed a computerized task where photographs of faces displaying anger, happiness, sadness, and fear were presented. The groups generally performed in line with previous research, but slightly differently from each other. For all three groups, the results showed that anger and happiness were more accurately identified, while sadness and fear were still difficult to identify for children at this age. However, there were interesting trends suggesting that balanced bilinguals made more refined judgments than the two other groups. Overall, this study supports the idea that the development of bilingual children is similar to their monolingual peers when it comes to learning to identify facial expressions of emotions, but that proportion of exposure to the bilingual child’s languages may lead to slightly different developmental courses.

National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-32163 (URN)
Conference
13th International Symposium of Psycholinguistics, April 5-8, 2017
Available from: 2017-11-27 Created: 2017-11-27 Last updated: 2017-11-28Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-7251-5263

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