miun.sePublications
Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
BETA
Dahl, Annika
Publications (5 of 5) Show all publications
Marnetoft, S.-U., Selander, J., Åkerström, B., Asplund, R. & Dahl, A. (2007). A comparison of perceived health, attitudes to work, leisure time, and social welfare systems among people in a rural area in the north of Sweden and among people in the city of Stockholm. Work: A journal of Prevention, Assesment and rehabilitation, 28(2), 153-164
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A comparison of perceived health, attitudes to work, leisure time, and social welfare systems among people in a rural area in the north of Sweden and among people in the city of Stockholm
Show others...
2007 (English)In: Work: A journal of Prevention, Assesment and rehabilitation, ISSN 1051-9815, E-ISSN 1875-9270, Vol. 28, no 2, p. 153-164Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A problem attracting considerable attention in Sweden today is the substantial regional differences in sickness absence. The aim of the study was to investigate and compare how people, from a random sample of the population in both a rural area in the north of Sweden and the Swedish capital Stockholm, perceive their health, and what their attitudes are to work, leisure time and social welfare systems. Results showed that a larger proportion of those answering in Stockholm considered their health status to be "very good", compared with those in the rural area (p<0.0001). A majority in the rural area compared to the city of Stockholm reported a high or very high level of aches/pain (p<0.0001) and that work causes them physical problems p<0.0001). The population in both Stockholm and the rural area is of the opinion that the increase in sickness absence is mainly due to deterioration in the work environment. Almost half of the individuals in both the rural area and in Stockholm are of the opinion that many of those sick-listed are not actually ill. It may be that in the rural area in north Sweden people are more inclined to put their opinions to practice than those in Stockholm are

Keywords
return to work, Rehabiliteringsvetenskap
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-4473 (URN)17312347 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-33847618764 (Scopus ID)5503 (Local ID)5503 (Archive number)5503 (OAI)
Available from: 2008-11-13 Created: 2008-11-13 Last updated: 2017-12-12Bibliographically approved
Norbergh, K.-G., Helin, Y., Dahl, A., Hellzén, O. & Asplund, K. (2006). Nurses' attitudes towards people with dementia: the semantic differential technique. Nursing Ethics, 13(3), 264-274
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Nurses' attitudes towards people with dementia: the semantic differential technique
Show others...
2006 (English)In: Nursing Ethics, ISSN 0969-7330, E-ISSN 1477-0989, Vol. 13, no 3, p. 264-274Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

One important aspect of the nurse-patient relationship is the nurses' attitudes towards their patients. Nurses' attitudes towards people with dementia have been studied from a wide range of approaches, but few of them have focused on the structure in nurses' attitudes. This study aimed to identify a structure in licensed practical nurses' attitudes towards people with dementia. Twenty-one group dwelling units for people with dementia at eleven nursing homes participated in the study. In all, 1,577 assessments of 178 patients were sent out to 181 respondents and 1,237 answers were returned. The semantic differential technique was used. The scale has 57 bipolar pairs of adjectives, which estimate an unknown number of dimensions of nurses' attitudes towards an identified patient. The assessments were analysed using entropy-based measures of association combined with structural plots. The analysis revealed four dimensions. These four dimensions related to licensed practical nurses' opinion of the patients; from an ethical and aesthetic dimension; their ability to understand; their ability to experience; their ability for social interaction. The study indicates that, on the positive to negative attitude continuum, attitudes fall at the positive to neutral end of the continuum. This is an important finding due to the personhood perspective. From this perspective, it is reasonable to assume that with a more positive attitude to people with dementia, the prerequisites for person-centred care will improve.

Keywords
attitudes, dementia, entropy, nursing, semantic differential, Omvårdnad
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-804 (URN)000236924400007 ()16711185 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-33646678478 (Scopus ID)3954 (Local ID)3954 (Archive number)3954 (OAI)
Available from: 2008-09-30 Created: 2008-09-30 Last updated: 2017-12-13Bibliographically approved
Hellzén, M., Lind, I., Dahl, A. & Hellzén, O. (2005). Psychiatric nurses attitudes towards identified in-patients as measured by the semantic differential technique. Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, 19(1), 12-19
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Psychiatric nurses attitudes towards identified in-patients as measured by the semantic differential technique
2005 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 12-19Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Nursing care can figuratively be described as a gift that is given by the nurse in the nurse-patient relationship where attitudes play an important role for the gift's appearance. Sometimes patients are unwilling to or incapable of accepting the gift and this can lead to situations in which nurses are not able to handle their situation in a professional manner. This research survey aimed to investigate nurses' attitudes and find a structure in nurses' attitudes towards their patients. Six psychiatric group dwellings and six acute psychiatric hospital wards participated in the study. In all, 2700 assessments of 163 patients were sent out to 160 respondents and 2436 answers were returned. The semantic differential technique was used. The scale has 57 bipolar pairs of adjective, which estimate an unknown number of dimensions of nurses' attitudes towards an identified patient. The respondents' answers were analysed through factor analysis rotated using the Varimax method and etropy-based measures of association combined with structural plots were also used. Both the factor analysis and the entropy revealed three factors, which were interpreted as being of evaluative type. Factor 1 was interpreted as describing nurses' answers mainly as a combination of an ethical and aesthetic evaluation of the patients. Factor 2 was interpreted as being of an empathetic type and factor 3 as nurses' experiences of the patients' cognitive capacity. The study indicates that the dominant aspect of nurses' attitudes in a psychiatric context is the ethical/aesthetic dimension, which is an important finding for the understanding of nurses' attitudes and actions towards their patients.

Keywords
attitudes, entropy, factor analysis, nursing, psychiatry, semantic differential
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-3142 (URN)000227708000003 ()15737160 (PubMedID)3058 (Local ID)3058 (Archive number)3058 (OAI)
Available from: 2008-09-30 Created: 2008-09-30 Last updated: 2017-12-12Bibliographically approved
Kristiansen, L., Dahl, A., Asplund, K. & Hellzén, O. (2005). The impact of nurses' opinion of client behaviour and level of social functioning on the amount of time they spend with clients. Journal of Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing, 12(6), 719-727
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The impact of nurses' opinion of client behaviour and level of social functioning on the amount of time they spend with clients
2005 (English)In: Journal of Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 1351-0126, Vol. 12, no 6, p. 719-727Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The impact of nurses' opinion of client behaviour and level of social functioning on the amount of time they spend with clients For people afflicted with different kinds of psychiatric disorder, suffering is a common denominator. The time the nurses spend with psychiatric clients may mirror their attitudes towards and feelings for these clients. The aim of this study was to investigate the connections between the time spent together and the nurses' opinion of client behaviour and social functioning in community-based psychiatry. In this quantitative study, 29 clients were assessed by 30 nurses, who answered the Global Assessment of Functioning Scale (GAF) and the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS). At the same time, 11,200 non-participant observations of clients were registered using the Patient Activity Classification (PAC) to investigate how they spent their time at two psychiatric group dwellings. The PAC instrument revealed that clients spent an average of 60.8% of time alone, while only 20% of their daily time was spent with the nurses. Based on a factor analysis, indices were made by setting cut-off points for the PANSS and the GAF scores, and four small groups of clients were generated: a relatively high level of social functioning and a low degree of psychiatric symptoms (A); a relatively high level of social functioning and a high degree of psychiatric symptoms (B); a low level of social functioning and a low degree of psychiatric symptoms (C); and, finally, a low level of social functioning and a high degree of psychiatric symptoms (D). The clients judged as having a low level of social functioning in combination with high degrees of psychiatric symptoms, that is, the most vulnerable and dependent individuals, receive less staff attention (18%) and are the clients who spend the most time alone (71.4%). It might be possible to interpret the results of this study in the light of a process of dehumanization.

Keywords
nursing
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-3821 (URN)16336597 (PubMedID)4214 (Local ID)4214 (Archive number)4214 (OAI)
Available from: 2008-11-19 Created: 2008-11-19Bibliographically approved
Lilja, L., Ördell, M., Dahl, A. & Hellzén, O. (2004). Judging the Other: Psychiatric nurses´ attitudes towards identified inpatients as measured by semantic differential technique. Journal of Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing, 11(5), 546-553
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Judging the Other: Psychiatric nurses´ attitudes towards identified inpatients as measured by semantic differential technique
2004 (English)In: Journal of Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 1351-0126, Vol. 11, no 5, p. 546-553Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Nurses' attitudes towards psychiatric patients can be expressed in terms of either a symptom-oriented approach or a personhood-focused approach where the latter is characterized by the ambition to establish a genuine and lasting relationship, while the former places the emphasis on correcting 'defective' patient behaviour. To study whether previous typologies found in a qualitative in-depth interview study exist in a larger quantitative investigation and, if so, to identify and describe a structure for the nurses' attitudes connected to each of the identified typologies. Six psychiatric group dwellings and six acute psychiatric hospital wards participated in the study. In all, 2700 assessments of 163 patients were sent out to 160 respondents and 2436 answers were returned, that is, the external dropout rate was 9.8%. The semantic differential technique was used. This is a method for quantifying the meaning that is attached to an identified phenomenon through series of bipolar pairs of adjectives. The scale has 57 bipolar pairs of adjectives, which estimates an unknown number of dimensions of nurses' attitudes towards an identified patient. The respondents' answers were analysed through entropy-based measures of association combined with structural plots. The analysis revealed that the four typologies existed as a delimited group, especially the groups of 'good' and 'evil' patients, while the 'crazy' and 'invisible' patients existed in a more blurred form. The analysis also revealed that the two groups, 'good' and 'evil', were connected to the nurses' ethical and aesthetic attitude structure, while the 'crazy' patients were linked to the cognitive structure and the 'invisible' patients to the empathetic structure. The study indicates that the two typologies, 'good' and 'evil', could be seen as each other's antithesis and, together with the other two typologies, 'crazy' and 'invisible', they touched upon a structure of the nurses' attitudes that was closely connected to a negative view of the patient except in one case -'the good' patients, which was probably based on his/her exterior symptoms.

Keywords
attitudes, entropy, nursing, psychiatry, semantic differential
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-392 (URN)10.1111/j.1365-2850.2004.00758.x (DOI)15450021 (PubMedID)2106 (Local ID)2106 (Archive number)2106 (OAI)
Available from: 2008-11-29 Created: 2008-11-29 Last updated: 2011-07-27Bibliographically approved
Organisations

Search in DiVA

Show all publications