miun.sePublications
Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
BETA
Mellander, Per-Erik
Alternative names
Publications (10 of 25) Show all publications
Mellander, P.-E., Begh, J., Lundmark, T. & Bishop, K. (2008). Recovery of photosynthetic capacity in Scots pine: a model analysis of forest plots with manipulated winter/spring soil temperature regimes.. European Journal of Forest Research, 127(1), 71-79
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Recovery of photosynthetic capacity in Scots pine: a model analysis of forest plots with manipulated winter/spring soil temperature regimes.
2008 (English)In: European Journal of Forest Research, ISSN 1612-4669, E-ISSN 1612-4677, Vol. 127, no 1, p. 71-79Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Both aboveground and belowground climate affects net primary production (NNP) and forest growth. Little is known about how above and belowground factors interact. The BIOMASS-model was tested to simulate photosynthetic recovery over a wide range of soil temperatures created by snow cover manipulations on tree-scale plots in a 20-year-old Scots pine stand in northern Sweden. The differences in timing of soil warming between the plots covered a span of two months. Carbon assimilation in needles, sap flow, needle water potential and climatic parameters were measured in the field. The simulations revealed that an early start of soil warming gave a relatively early photosynthetic recovery and a 7.5% increase of NPP. Late soil warming delayed the photosynthetic recovery and reduced the NPP by 13.7%. This indicated that soil temperature needed to be accounted for, as well as air temperature, when analysing photosynthetic recovery and NPP in boreal environment. The effects of differences in soil temperature were reflected in the simulated photosynthetic recovery. The model did not fully capture the delay of photosynthetic recovery caused by a late soil warming. It was possible to integrate the complexity of the soil climate effects into a threshold date for soil thaw, using sapflow measurements together with information about air temperature and a day degree sum, as long as water availability was not limiting water uptake by roots. Although a more realistic mechanism than that currently in BIOMASS is desirable as climate change shifts the typical patterns of interplay between air and soil temperature dynamics.

Keywords
Low temperature, net primary production, carbon assimilation, sap flow, water potential, BIOMASS, Pinus Sylvestris.
National Category
Biological Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-1229 (URN)10.1007/s10342-007-0184-4 (DOI)000251609800006 ()2-s2.0-37349070112 (Scopus ID)5574 (Local ID)5574 (Archive number)5574 (OAI)
Note
VR-BiologyAvailable from: 2008-12-09 Created: 2008-12-09 Last updated: 2017-12-13Bibliographically approved
Vestin, J. L. K., Norström, S. H., Bylund, D., Mellander, P.-E. & Lundström, U. S. (2008). Soil solution and stream water chemistry in a forested catchment I: Dynamics. Geoderma, 144(1/2), 256-270
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Soil solution and stream water chemistry in a forested catchment I: Dynamics
Show others...
2008 (English)In: Geoderma, ISSN 0016-7061, E-ISSN 1872-6259, Vol. 144, no 1/2, p. 256-270Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Soil solution and stream water chemistry were studied during two years in a catchment in Bispgården in central Sweden (63°07′N, 16°70′E). Soil samples and soil solution were collected in a slope at two distances (10 and 80 m) from a stream. The aims were to examine interactions between recharge (podzol) and discharge (arenosol) areas and to investigate the relations between soil solution and stream water chemistry. The parent material was similar within the catchment, but the content of C and N were higher in the discharge area most likely due to the difference in hydrological conditions compared to the recharge area. Exchangeable cations and base saturation were higher in the discharge area than in the recharge area, which may be due to the higher content of C. The concentrations in soil solution of H, DOC, NO3, SO4, Al, Si, Ca and K charge area compared to the recharge area which was probably caused by transportation of elements in soil and retention due to the increased content of C. During snow melt, the concentrations in soil solution of DOC, SO4, Al, Si, Ca and K were low due to dilution and low biological activity. The concentrations were then increasing during the seasons as an effect of biological activity and mineral weathering. NO3 concentration in soil solution was found in higher concentrations during snow melting and was then diminishing during summer likely as a result of biological uptake. After a dry period followed by an intensive rain in August 2003, the stream water chemistry was markedly altered for a few days. The concentrations of H, DOC SO4, Al and Ca were increased and the concentration of Si was decreased in the stream water. It therefore appeared that the stream water mirrored the upper soil horizons in the discharge area during high flows, while reflecting the lower soil horizons and ground water during low flows.

Keywords
Catchment, soil solution
National Category
Chemical Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-3614 (URN)10.1016/j.geoderma.2007.11.026 (DOI)000254473000024 ()2-s2.0-39549097317 (Scopus ID)5600 (Local ID)5600 (Archive number)5600 (OAI)
Note
VR-EcologyAvailable from: 2008-12-04 Created: 2008-11-19 Last updated: 2017-12-12Bibliographically approved
Mellander, P.-E., Ottosson Löfvenius, M. & Laudon, H. (2007). Climate change impact on snow and soil temperature in boreal Scots pine stands. Climatic Change, 85(1/2), 179-193
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Climate change impact on snow and soil temperature in boreal Scots pine stands
2007 (English)In: Climatic Change, ISSN 0165-0009, Vol. 85, no 1/2, p. 179-193Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Scenarios indicate that the air temperature will increase in high latitude regions in coming decades, causing the snow covered period to shorten, the growing season to lengthen and soil temperatures to change during the winter, spring and early summer. To evaluate how a warmer climate is likely to alter the snow cover and soil temperature in Scots pine stands of varying ages in northern Sweden, climate scenarios from the Swedish regional climate modelling programme SWECLIM were used to drive a Soil-Vegetation-Atmosphere Transfer (SVAT)-model (COUP). Using the two CO2 emission scenarios A and B in the Hadley centres global climate model, HadleyA and HadleyB, SWECLIM predicts that the annual mean air temperature and precipitation will increase at most 4.8 oC and 315 mm, respectively, within a century in the study region. The results of this analysis indicate that a warmer climate will shorten the period of persistent snow pack by 73 - 93 days, increase the average soil temperature by 0.9 � 1.5 oC at 10 cm depth, advance soil warming by 15 - 19 days in spring and cause more soil freeze-thaw cycles by 31 � 38 %. The results also predict that the large current variations in snow cover due to variations in tree interception and topography will be enhanced in the coming century, resulting in increased spatial variability in soil temperatures.

Keywords
Soil warming, snow cover, growing season, freeze-thaw cycles, interception, leaf area index, Pinus Sylvestris, SWECLIM, COUP-model.
National Category
Biological Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-4517 (URN)10.1007/s10584-007-9254-3 (DOI)5573 (Local ID)5573 (Archive number)5573 (OAI)
Available from: 2008-09-30 Created: 2009-06-08Bibliographically approved
Mellander, P.-E., Stähli, M., Gustafsson, D. & Bishop, K. (2006). Modelling the effect of low soil temperatures on transpiration by Scots pine.. Hydrological Processes, 20(9), 1929-1944
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Modelling the effect of low soil temperatures on transpiration by Scots pine.
2006 (English)In: Hydrological Processes, ISSN 0885-6087, Vol. 20, no 9, p. 1929-1944Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

For ecosystem modelling of the Boreal forest it is important to include processes associated with low soil temperature during spring/early summer, as these affect the tree water uptake. The COUP-model, a physically based SVAT-model, was tested with two years of soil and snow physical measurements, as well as sap flow measurements in a 70-year old Scots pine stand in the boreal zone of northern Sweden. During the first year the extent and duration of soil frost was manipulated in the field. The model was successful in reproducing the timing of the soil warming after the snowmelt and frost thaw. A delayed soil warming, into the growing season, severely reduced the transpiration. We demonstrated the potential for considerable overestimation of transpiration by the model if the reduction of the trees� capacity to transpire due to low soil temperatures is not taken into account. We also demonstrated that the accumulated effect of aboveground conditions could be included when simulating the relationship between soil temperature and tree water uptake. This improved the estimated transpiration for the control plot and when soil warming was delayed into the growing season. The study illustrated the need of including antecedent conditions on root growth in the model in order to catch these effects on transpiration. The COUP-model is a promising tool for predicting transpiration in high latitude stands.

Keywords
Snow, soil frost, soil temperature, sap flow, root water uptake, COUP-model
National Category
Biological Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-4518 (URN)10.1002/hyp.6045 (DOI)5575 (Local ID)5575 (Archive number)5575 (OAI)
Available from: 2008-09-30 Created: 2008-09-30 Last updated: 2011-08-18Bibliographically approved
Mellander, P. E., Laudon, H. & Bishop, K. (2005). Modelling variability of snow depths and soil temperatures in Scots pine stands.. Agricultural and Forest Meteorology, 133(1/4), 109-118
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Modelling variability of snow depths and soil temperatures in Scots pine stands.
2005 (English)In: Agricultural and Forest Meteorology, ISSN 0168-1923, Vol. 133, no 1/4, p. 109-118Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Snow cover varies spatially and inter-annually in the boreal forest landscape due to the canopy influence on snow interception and snow surface energy balance. This is reflected in the soil temperature regime during winter and spring. Differences in the timing of soil warming have been shown to influence the trees� capacity to take up water and assimilate carbon. To understand the effects of forest management or a possible climate change on forest productivity, it is useful to have a tool for predicting the spatial and inter-annual variability of snow depths and soil warming during spring within different stands across the landscape. A SVAT-model (COUP) was used to simulate snow cover and soil temperature during a decade in eight Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L) stands. The COUP-model proved to be a functional tool for simulating the intra-landscape variation in snow depth and soil temperature. The simulations revealed variability between the stands and between the years, as well as factors contributing to this variability. A more open stand together with low leaf area index resulted in deeper snow layers and, together with higher trees, also an earlier soil warming. The largest spatial variability in the timing of soil warming in spring between sites was found during years with little snow, which is a possible consequence of climate change-related warming in the boreal landscape of northern Sweden.

Keywords
Soil warming, snow cover, interception, leaf area index, Pinus Sylvestris, COUP-model.
National Category
Biological Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-4519 (URN)10.1016/j.agrformet.2005.08.008 (DOI)5576 (Local ID)5576 (Archive number)5576 (OAI)
Available from: 2008-09-30 Created: 2009-06-08Bibliographically approved
Mellander, P. E., Laudon, H. & Ottosson Löfvenius, M. (2005). Snödjup och marktempertur i norrländska skogar idag och om 100 år. Uppsala: Sveriges Lantbruksuniversitet
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Snödjup och marktempertur i norrländska skogar idag och om 100 år
2005 (Swedish)Book (Other academic)
Abstract [sv]

Ett framtida varmare klimat kan medföra att den snötäckta perioden i skogslandskapet förkortas, årsmedeltemperaturen i marken höjs, markuppvärmningen på våren sker tidigare, samt att fler cykler av frysning och upptining äger rum. • Tunnare snötäcke kan medföra en ökad rumslig variation i marktemperatur p.g.a. ett större relativt inflytande på snödjupet av topografin samt av trädens förmåga att fånga upp nederbörd och solstrålning. • Under vissa år kan ett varmare klimat på nordliga breddgrader medföra en försenad markuppvärmning och större mellanårsvariationer i täta bestånd.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Uppsala: Sveriges Lantbruksuniversitet, 2005. p. 4
Series
Fakta Skog : sammanfattar aktuell forskning, ISSN 1400-7789 ; 14
Keywords
Snötäcke, boreal skog, marktemperatur, global uppvärmning
National Category
Biological Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-5980 (URN)5603 (Local ID)5603 (Archive number)5603 (OAI)
Available from: 2008-09-30 Created: 2008-09-30 Last updated: 2012-01-16Bibliographically approved
Mellander, P.-E. (2004). Sen vår ger kraftigt hämmad tillväxt. Uppsala: Sveriges Lantbruksuniversitet
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sen vår ger kraftigt hämmad tillväxt
2004 (Swedish)Book (Other academic)
Abstract [sv]

Att låga temperaturer i marken hämmar upptag av vatten och gasutbyte hos unga plantor är känt sedan tidigare. Nu visar sig detta gälla även för stora tallar. Tjälproblematiken bör därför uppmärksammas mer, även för bestånd som har lämnat plantstadiet. • För att träden ska kunna ta upp vatten på våren räcker det inte med att vattnet är ofruset. I rotzonens övre del måste vattnet ha en temperatur högre än 0°C för att rötterna ska kunna tillgodogöra sig det. • Tallarnas upptag av vatten från marken och kol från atmosfären minskar kraftigt när uppvärmningen av marken försenas in i växtperioden, och upptaget fortsätter att hämmas tills marktemperaturen är cirka +8°C. Vid högre temperaturer avgörs vatten- och kolupptaget främst av klimatet ovan mark.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Uppsala: Sveriges Lantbruksuniversitet, 2004. p. 4
Series
Fakta skog : sammanfattar aktuell forskning, ISSN 1400-7789 ; 2004 : 3
Keywords
Snö, skog, tjäle, marktemperatur, savflöde, koldioxidupptag, transpiration, VPD
National Category
Biological Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-5981 (URN)5604 (Local ID)5604 (Archive number)5604 (OAI)
Available from: 2008-09-30 Created: 2008-09-30 Last updated: 2012-01-17Bibliographically approved
Mellander, P.-E., Bishop, K. & Lundmark, T. (2004). The influence of soil temperature on transpiration:: a plot scale manipulation in a young Scots pine stand. Forest Ecology and Management, 195(1-2), 15-28
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The influence of soil temperature on transpiration:: a plot scale manipulation in a young Scots pine stand
2004 (English)In: Forest Ecology and Management, ISSN 0378-1127, Vol. 195, no 1-2, p. 15-28Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Classic studies have stressed the importance of forest management for soil frost and the dynamics of soil warming during spring. But, we know very little about the potential loss of forest production due to cold soils. Liquid soil water may not be available to trees due to cold soil conditions, thus reducing transpiration and photosynthesis. We believe that these effects need to be quantified in order to keep silvicultural practices from inadvertently reducing forest growth through effects on soil temperature. In order to test this hypothesis it is important to know more about water uptake in the field by trees in cold environments. The snow cover was manipulated on plots in a young stand of Pinus sylvestris L. to create plots with different timings of soil warming. Soil profile temperature and liquid water content, as well as snow and frost depths, were measured together with tree physiological parameters such as sap flow, stomatal conductance and needle water potential. The study has confirmed the importance of the soil temperature for tree water uptake when soil warming was delayed beyond the start of growing season as defined by air temperature. The absence of frost (and hence the presence of liquid water) was not sufficient to enable water uptake. It was rather elevation of soil temperature above zero in the upper soil layers that was required for substantial water uptake, in combination with other site factors. Below ca. +8 °C, soil temperature was a factor in the restriction of transpiration, explained by a lower stomatal conductance and likely decreased root permeability. The effect of a certain soil temperature was not the same at different times due to its interaction with aboveground factors such as air temperature and day-length. The effect of low soil temperature increased with the persistence of low temperatures after the start of the growing season. The timings of soil warming induced by our study were within the spatial and inter-annual variation of soil warming in this region. Thus, we conclude that influences of forest management on soil temperature can affect the transpiration deficit during spring, with potential implications for forest productivity

Keywords
Water stress; soil frost; snow cover; soil temperature; hydraulic conductance; root water uptake, Scots pine.
National Category
Biological Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-1205 (URN)10.1016/j.foreco.2004.02.051 (DOI)5578 (Local ID)5578 (Archive number)5578 (OAI)
Available from: 2008-09-30 Created: 2008-09-30 Last updated: 2011-01-10Bibliographically approved
Bhupinderpal-Singh, ., Nordgren, A., Ottosson Löfvenius, M., Högberg, H.-E., Mellander, P.- . E. & Högberg, P. (2003). Large-scale girdling of Scots pine boreal forest reveals controls and estimates of mycorrhizal root soil heterotrophic respiration. In: Proceedings Third International Symposium on the Dynamics of Physiological Processes in Woody Roots. Perth, Western Australia 29 Sept – 3 Oct, 2003.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Large-scale girdling of Scots pine boreal forest reveals controls and estimates of mycorrhizal root soil heterotrophic respiration
Show others...
2003 (English)In: Proceedings Third International Symposium on the Dynamics of Physiological Processes in Woody Roots. Perth, Western Australia 29 Sept – 3 Oct, 2003, 2003Conference paper, Published paper (Other scientific)
Keywords
Pinus Sylvestris, photosynthate allocation, sap flow, soil respiration, soil temperature, VPD
National Category
Chemical Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-4399 (URN)5623 (Local ID)5623 (Archive number)5623 (OAI)
Available from: 2008-09-30 Created: 2008-09-30Bibliographically approved
Mellander, P.-E. (2003). Spring water stress in Scots pine: interaction of snow and soil temperature. (Doctoral dissertation). Uppsala: SLU, Dept. of Environmental Assessment
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Spring water stress in Scots pine: interaction of snow and soil temperature
2003 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Water use and net carbon assimilation during spring was examined on Scots pine trees exposed to different soil warming dynamics in the field. Sap flow, needle water potential and net carbon assimilation were measured on trees that were exposed to a wide range of soil temperature regimes caused by manipulating the snow cover on tree-scale soil plots. This made it possible to quantify the sensitivity of water uptake and recovery of gas exchange by Scots pine in the critical transition from winter dormancy to the growing season, which can be influenced by silvicultural practices. A part of the study was to find a tool for estimating the coupled effect of belowground and aboveground climate on transpiration, as well as to adapt this tool to the harsh climate of the boreal forest. Combining the results of field experiments on tree susceptibility to water stress with a physically based SVAT model as well as a model for estimating the recovery of photosynthesis helped to predict spatial and inter-annual variability of snow depths, soil warming, water uptake and net primary productivity during spring within different Scots pine stands across the landscape. This could provide a better basis for a more frostconscious forest management. The studies have confirmed the importance of low soil temperatures in combination with aboveground climate for root water uptake and net carbon assimilation during spring, when soil warming occurs after the start of the growing season. The studies have also confirmed that earlier, controlled laboratory studies on the inhibiting effects of low soil temperature on water relations and gas exchange for seedlings or saplings also hold true on mature trees in the field. The experimental data served well as the basis for model analyses of the interaction between belowground and aboveground conditions on water use and net photosynthesis. The results of the field studies and model analyses suggest that the effect of soil temperature on tree water uptake and net photosynthesis during spring, in conjunction with aboveground conditions, are factors that need to be considered in forest management in areas susceptible to soil frost and low soil temperatures.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Uppsala: SLU, Dept. of Environmental Assessment, 2003. p. 39
Series
Acta Universitatis agriculturae Sueciae. Silvestria, ISSN 1401-6230 ; 287
Keywords
Low temperature, soil warming, transpiration, root water uptake, carbon dioxide assimilation, soil frost, silvicultural practice, Pinus Sylvestris
National Category
Biological Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-5957 (URN)5621 (Local ID)91-576-6521-4 (ISBN)5621 (Archive number)5621 (OAI)
Public defence
(English)
Available from: 2008-09-30 Created: 2009-06-08Bibliographically approved
Organisations

Search in DiVA

Show all publications