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Kuzmin, Leonid
Publications (10 of 15) Show all publications
Koptyug, A. & Kuzmin, L. (2011). Experimental field studies of the cross-country ski running surface interaction with snow. In: Procedia Engineering: . Paper presented at 5th Asia-Pacific Congress on Sports Technology: Impact of Technology on Sport IV, APCST;Melbourne, VIC;28 August 2011through31 August 2011;Code86031 (pp. 23-29). Elsevier, 13
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Experimental field studies of the cross-country ski running surface interaction with snow
2011 (English)In: Procedia Engineering, Elsevier, 2011, Vol. 13, p. 23-29Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The ability of the cross-country skis to glide freely is of very high importance for both sports and recreational skiing. Significant body of research and development is nowadays devoted to the materials and treatment methods for improving gliding of the ski running surfaces, as well as to the related skiing techniques for optimal use of ski gliding. One of the common concepts here is that the most significant energy loss contribution in such interaction is caused by the pure interfacial friction of the ski running surface and the snow. But this interaction is quite complex and we have proposed that other channels of the energy loss can be of significance. Among the possibilities one can point out to the effects of the snow deformation under the skis, "dragging" of snow by the skis and damping of the ski vibrations by the snow. Present paper reports on the field experimental studies of the ski interaction with the snow. These studies are aiming at developing the measurement technology allowing the assessment of gliding properties of the cross-country skis when data are collected from the sensors placed into the ski track.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2011
Series
Procedia Engineering, ISSN 18777058 ; 13
Keywords
Running surface, Ski, Ski track deformation, Ski-snow interaction, Snow displacement
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-15366 (URN)10.1016/j.proeng.2011.05.046 (DOI)000300214900004 ()2-s2.0-80051612319 (Scopus ID)
Conference
5th Asia-Pacific Congress on Sports Technology: Impact of Technology on Sport IV, APCST;Melbourne, VIC;28 August 2011through31 August 2011;Code86031
Available from: 2011-12-18 Created: 2011-12-18 Last updated: 2016-12-16Bibliographically approved
Bäckström, M., Rännar, L.-E. & Kuzmin, L. (2011). Influencing factors on time-loss after shooting in Biathlon. In: Moderns systems for application in Biathlon (pp. 154-159). Omck: Russian Sports Federation
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Influencing factors on time-loss after shooting in Biathlon
2011 (English)In: Moderns systems for application in Biathlon, Omck: Russian Sports Federation , 2011, p. 154-159Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Omck: Russian Sports Federation, 2011
National Category
Applied Mechanics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-15566 (URN)978-5-91930-015-1 (ISBN)
Available from: 2011-12-20 Created: 2011-12-20 Last updated: 2011-12-20Bibliographically approved
Kuzmin, L. (2010). Interfacial kinetic ski friction. (Doctoral dissertation). Östersund: Mittuniversitetet
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Interfacial kinetic ski friction
2010 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

It is no doubt, that the ski glide over the snow is a very complicated object of

research. However, ski glide is just a one area of many other areas of human

knowledge. As a rule, the scientists and practitioners, who work in these areas,

operate with some publicly expressed more or less solid hypotheses. These

researchers work with one hypothesis until another and a better one comes up.

Our literature studies and our own observations regarding modern skis

preparations, did not give us any solid hypotheses, which are able to explain the

actual form and content of this procedure. The present work is an attempt to reveal

such hypotheses.

Conclusion: To achieve an optimal glide on skis with the base (the ski sole)

made of some high hydrophobic durable polymer, e.g. UHMWPE, PTFE; we only

have to create an adequate topography (texture) on the ski running surface,

adequate to the actual snow conditions.

 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Östersund: Mittuniversitetet, 2010. p. 40
Series
Mid Sweden University doctoral thesis, ISSN 1652-893X ; 88
Keywords
ski glide, ski base, ski wax, hydrophobicity, UHMWPE, PTFE, topography
National Category
Mechanical Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-11525 (URN)978-91-86073-79-4 (ISBN)
Public defence
2010-06-15, F234, Campus Östersund, Östersund, 10:15 (Swedish)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2010-05-17 Created: 2010-05-17 Last updated: 2010-05-17Bibliographically approved
Kuzmin, L., Carlsson, P. & Tinnsten, M. (2010). The relationship between the type of machining of the ski running surface and its wettability and capillary drag. Sports Technology, 3(2), 121-130
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The relationship between the type of machining of the ski running surface and its wettability and capillary drag
2010 (English)In: Sports Technology, ISSN 1934-6182, E-ISSN 1934-6190, Vol. 3, no 2, p. 121-130Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper considers the mechanically treated dry ski running surface. The difference in the shear wettability of ski running surfaces treated using different types of machining was studied by measuring the advanced and receding contact angles on two different ski base materials. The hypothesis regarding relationship between the shear wettability and the capillary drag of ski running surface have been presented. The study found, that ski running surfaces with a lower roughness (e.g. flattened by a steel drum or sliced) have a lower wettability factor and seem to be more effective in reducing capillary drag under homogenous wetting conditions.

Keywords
Ski base, stone grinding, capillary drag, contact angle
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-11523 (URN)10.1080/19346182.2010.538399 (DOI)2-s2.0-85008848754 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2010-05-17 Created: 2010-05-17 Last updated: 2017-07-03Bibliographically approved
Kuzmin, L., Dahlén, L., Ebrahimzadeh, R. & Wiklund, H. (2009). Comparison of Ski Running Surfaces Machined by Various Stone Grinding Equipments. In: The Impact of Technology on Sport III (pp. 27-31). Melbourne, Australia: RMIT University
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Comparison of Ski Running Surfaces Machined by Various Stone Grinding Equipments
2009 (English)In: The Impact of Technology on Sport III, Melbourne, Australia: RMIT University , 2009, p. 27-31Chapter in book (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Stone-grinding is an important part of the process of preparing the ski running surface (SRS). The ski base is stone-ground in order to achieve a level surface and to give the SRS a specific pattern texture, depending on the snow conditions, in order to reduce the capillary drag, which is a part of total ski friction. In this study, skis were ground using three different machines (Mantec, Tazzari and Wintersteiger), each with distinctive pattern. The stone-grinding was performed in the same way and by the same operator on each of the machines. The roughness and the hydrophobic characteristics of the SRS produced by the machines were measured. The results of the experiment show that stone-grinding is able to change the magnitude of the capillary drag dramatically, up to 74% in the case studied.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Melbourne, Australia: RMIT University, 2009
National Category
Manufacturing, Surface and Joining Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-10025 (URN)978-1-921426-39-1 (ISBN)
Available from: 2009-10-14 Created: 2009-10-13 Last updated: 2011-07-06Bibliographically approved
Bäckström, M., Kuzmin, L., Rännar, L.-E. & Wiklund, H. (2009). Critical Factors Influencing Loss of Time after Shooting - A Case Study Performed During the 2008 IBU Biathlon World Championships. In: The Impact of Technology on Sport III (pp. 33-37).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Critical Factors Influencing Loss of Time after Shooting - A Case Study Performed During the 2008 IBU Biathlon World Championships
2009 (English)In: The Impact of Technology on Sport III, 2009, p. 33-37Chapter in book (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The final result during a biathlon race is a composition of skiing, shooting and in some cases penalty time or rounds. One of the most decisive parts of the competition is the shooting component. The shooting component itself can be subdivided into separate parts: Actions just before shooting, the shooting itself and actions after the shooting. In the case of a slow approach to the firing line partially caused by dismounting of ski poles, time loss is tactically accepted by some skiers – heart rate decreases and a mental focus can be obtained. A slow departure from the firing line and the subsequent loss of time is on the contrary absolutely not desirable. A part of the lost time after shooting is observed to be related to mounting the ski poles. Modern ski poles can be divided into three groups of strap systems: 1. Simple loop; 2. Strap with Velcro fastener; 3. Click-in (typically Leki).

The paper presents a case study aimed at finding how the ski pole strapping system influences time loss after shooting. The study was performed during the IBU Biathlon World Championship 2008 in Östersund, Sweden. Time measurements were made over a defined distance allowing the athletes to approach cruising speed after the last shot in a series. The measurements for each athlete have been normalized relative his/her racing performance. The results clearly indicate time differences between strap systems. In some cases the differences could mean achieving podium place or not.

National Category
Social Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-10056 (URN)978-1-921426-39-1 (ISBN)
Available from: 2009-10-16 Created: 2009-10-16 Last updated: 2010-12-29Bibliographically approved
Kuzmin, L. & Tinnsten, M. (2008). Estimation of dirt attraction on running surfaces of cross-country skis. In: IMPACT OF TECHNOLOGY ON SPORTS II: . Paper presented at 3rd Asia-Pacific Congress on Sports Technology, Sep 23-26, 2007, Singapore (pp. 851-856). London, UK: Taylor & Francis
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Estimation of dirt attraction on running surfaces of cross-country skis
2008 (English)In: IMPACT OF TECHNOLOGY ON SPORTS II, London, UK: Taylor & Francis, 2008, p. 851-856Conference paper, Published paper (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Methods for analysing impurities in snow are used in glaciology and ecological studies. However, the relationship between the dirt accumulation on the ski running surface and the concentration of pollution in the snow is not straightforward, since the interaction between the top layer of snow in the ski track and the ski running surface is responsible for the dirt accumulation on the running surface. In this paper the dirt film accumulated on the gliding surface is studied. A number of XC skis with a transparent base and a white background were examined after undergoing different treatments. Measurements of the whiteness of the running surface of the skis were carried out and glide tests were performed. The measurements and tests were repeated after skiing various distances on a ski track under varying snow conditions. The following observations were made during the study: - The experimental setup could deliver a reliable value of the whiteness of the ski running surface. We achieved 0,3% standard deviation in a test on a control sample; - The correlation between the ski glide and the amount of dirt is obvious and significant.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London, UK: Taylor & Francis, 2008
Keywords
glide
National Category
Mechanical Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-4309 (URN)252145800124 ()2-s2.0-61849145192 (Scopus ID)5130 (Local ID)978-0-415-45695-1 (ISBN)5130 (Archive number)5130 (OAI)
Conference
3rd Asia-Pacific Congress on Sports Technology, Sep 23-26, 2007, Singapore
Available from: 2008-11-29 Created: 2008-11-28 Last updated: 2016-09-26Bibliographically approved
Kuzmin, L. & Tinnsten, M. (2008). Hot Glide Wax Treatment and the Hardness of the Ski Running Surface. In: Estivalet, M & Brisson, P (Ed.), Estivalet, M; Brisson, P (Ed.), ENGINEERING OF SPORT 7, VOL 2. Paper presented at ISEA 2008 Conference on Engineering of Sport 7, Jun 02-06, 2008, Biarritz, France (pp. 135-141). Paris: Springer
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Hot Glide Wax Treatment and the Hardness of the Ski Running Surface
2008 (English)In: ENGINEERING OF SPORT 7, VOL 2 / [ed] Estivalet, M; Brisson, P, Paris: Springer, 2008, p. 135-141Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

In the cross country skiing community, hot wax treatment of the ski running surface (SRS) is used in order to influence the surface hardness of the skis in relation to the hardness of the snow crystals. This is discussed in a number of scientific papers and recommended in almost every ski waxing manual. The general idea is to decrease (soften) the surface hardness by the use of a soft glide wax treatment for wet snow conditions and to increase (harden) the hardness of the surface by a hard (synthetic) glide wax treatment for cold, dry snow conditions. The question is; does the hot glide wax treatment of the ski running surface influence the surface hardness? And if so, in what way?In our experiment, ski base specimens of UHMWPE (transparent and “graphite”) were treated with ski glide wax. Half of the specimens were treated with soft yellow glide wax, and half with hard green glide wax. After the wax treatment, the surface hardness (Shore D) was measured with a durometer. The study revealed that: both soft glide wax and hard glide wax treatment make the SRS softer; after a long immersion (12 hours) in the bath of melted glide wax, both the hardness of the specimens treated with soft glide wax and of those treated with hard glide wax decreased significant. Conclusion: The hot wax treatment of the SRS with available glide waxes cannot make the SRS harder than it was initially (unwaxed).

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Paris: Springer, 2008
Keywords
ski base; glide wax; hardness
National Category
Mechanical Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-7214 (URN)000259392700016 ()978-2-287-09412-5 (ISBN)
Conference
ISEA 2008 Conference on Engineering of Sport 7, Jun 02-06, 2008, Biarritz, France
Available from: 2008-11-30 Created: 2008-11-28 Last updated: 2013-03-25Bibliographically approved
Kuzmin, L. & Tinnsten, M. (2007). The contamination, wettability and gliding ability of ski running surfaces. In: Linnamo, V, Komi, P V & Müller, E (Ed.), Science and Nordic Skiing (pp. 340). Oxford: Meyer & Meyer Sport
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The contamination, wettability and gliding ability of ski running surfaces
2007 (English)In: Science and Nordic Skiing / [ed] Linnamo, V, Komi, P V & Müller, E, Oxford: Meyer & Meyer Sport, 2007, p. 340-Chapter in book (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The UHMWPE (press-sintered) ski base and ski glide waxes are very similar substances. Hence, it should be possible to achieve a same or even better glide on a bare ski base. In this study we examined waxed and unwaxed skis before and after skiing for the purpose of gliding ability, dirt accumulation and wettability. We observed that the skis with unwaxed running surface did retain a same or higher comparative level of all three tested parameters. We can assume that it is a consequence of a soft wax dirt accumulation under warm conditions and of the excessively hot ski base treatment under cold and dry conditions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford: Meyer & Meyer Sport, 2007
Keywords
Snow, Dirt, Wax, Ski, UHMWPE
National Category
Mechanical Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-4300 (URN)5101 (Local ID)978-1-84126-229-1 (ISBN)5101 (Archive number)5101 (OAI)
Available from: 2008-09-30 Created: 2008-09-30 Last updated: 2011-12-22Bibliographically approved
Kuzmin, L. & Tinnsten, M. (2006). Contamination, wettability and the ski running surface gliding ability. In: International congress on science and Nordic skiing, June 18.-20. 2006 Vuokatti, Finland: ICSNS 2006. Jyväskylä: Univ. Jyväskylä, Department of physical activity
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Contamination, wettability and the ski running surface gliding ability
2006 (English)In: International congress on science and Nordic skiing, June 18.-20. 2006 Vuokatti, Finland: ICSNS 2006, Jyväskylä: Univ. Jyväskylä, Department of physical activity , 2006Conference paper, Published paper (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Jyväskylä: Univ. Jyväskylä, Department of physical activity, 2006
Keywords
ski snow dirt contact angle
National Category
Mechanical Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-3901 (URN)4259 (Local ID)4259 (Archive number)4259 (OAI)
Available from: 2008-09-30 Created: 2008-09-30 Last updated: 2011-05-30Bibliographically approved
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