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Gorski, Dmitri
Publications (10 of 11) Show all publications
Gorski, D. & Hill, J. (2012). Improved quality of SC magazine paper through enhanced fibre development using the ATMP process. Nordic Pulp & Paper Research Journal, 27(1), 35-41
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Improved quality of SC magazine paper through enhanced fibre development using the ATMP process
2012 (English)In: Nordic Pulp & Paper Research Journal, ISSN 0283-2631, E-ISSN 2000-0669, Vol. 27, no 1, p. 35-41Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A pilot scale refining trial was conducted using the ATMP (Advanced Thermomechanical Pulp) refining concept with White spruce as raw material. Low-intensity TMP and high-intensity TMP with mechanical pre-treatment of chips were compared to ATMP (Mg+P), where development of fibres was enhanced using hydrogen peroxide and magnesium hydroxide. The main goal of the trial was to evaluate the potential of using ATMP process for production of SC (supercalendered) magazine paper. SC paper is especially demanding when it comes to the paper surface structure which is strongly influenced by the development of fibre properties.

Improvement in individual fibre properties such as flexibility, fibre split index and fibre surface area index achieved using ATMP process was found to translate into decreased surface roughness and air permeability of calendered laboratory sheets. Both the refining process configuration and the addition of process chemicals were found to have significant impacts though the process configuration had major role. The influence of process chemicals on PPS was mainly pronounced after second stage refining. The magnitude of surface roughening (fibre rising) was found to be influenced mainly by the process configuration.

Keywords
ATMP; Energy reduction; Fibre roughening; Refiner bleaching; Sc paper
National Category
Chemical Process Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-15625 (URN)000311019900004 ()2-s2.0-84860195857 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2011-12-23 Created: 2011-12-23 Last updated: 2017-12-08Bibliographically approved
Gorski, D., Johansson, L. & Engstrand, P. (2012). Refiner bleaching in a peroxide-based ATMP process compared with conventional bleaching. Holzforschung, 66(3), 275-281
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Refiner bleaching in a peroxide-based ATMP process compared with conventional bleaching
2012 (English)In: Holzforschung, ISSN 0018-3830, E-ISSN 1437-434X, Vol. 66, no 3, p. 275-281Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of this study was to compare refiner bleaching with conventional laboratory bleaching by means of hydrogen peroxide and magnesium hydroxide. Refiner bleaching in this study was a part of the ATMP (advanced thermo mechanical pulping) process, in which bleaching chemicals are added to the first stage refiner. Unbleached reference pulp which underwent similar mechanical treatment as refiner bleached pulp was used for laboratory bleaching. Bleaching efficiency was found to be almost equal for pilot scale refiner bleaching and conventional laboratory bleaching. A brightness increase of 10 ISO was reached with addition of 26 kg t -1 hydrogen peroxide leading to a final brightness of 66 ISO using both methods. Slightly more COD (52kg t -1 compared with 46 kg t -1) was generated in refiner bleaching compared with conventional laboratory bleaching to equal brightness with the same chemicals added. © 2012 by Walter de Gruyter Berlin Boston 2012.

Keywords
advanced thermo mechanical pulping (ATMP); COD; hydrogen peroxide; magnesium hydroxide; refiner bleaching
National Category
Paper, Pulp and Fiber Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-16741 (URN)10.1515/hf.2011.156 (DOI)000303475300001 ()2-s2.0-84860680573 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2012-08-20 Created: 2012-08-17 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved
Gorski, D. (2011). ATMP Process: Improved Energy Efficiency in TMP Refining Utilizing Selective Wood Disintegration and Targeted Application of Chemicals. (Doctoral dissertation). Sundsvall: Mid Sweden University
Open this publication in new window or tab >>ATMP Process: Improved Energy Efficiency in TMP Refining Utilizing Selective Wood Disintegration and Targeted Application of Chemicals
2011 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

This thesis is focused on the novel wood chip refining process called AdvancedThermomechanical Pulp (ATMP) refining. ATMP consists of mechanical pretreatmentof chips in Impressafiner and Fiberizer prior to first stage refining atincreased intensity. Process chemicals (this study was concentrated on hydrogenperoxide and magnesium hydroxide) are introduced into the first stage refiner.It is known that the use of chemicals in TMP process and first stage refining atelevated intensity can reduce the energy demands of refining. The downside is thatthey also alter the character of the produced pulp. Reductions in fibre length andtear index are usually the consequences of refining at elevated intensity. Additionof chemicals usually leads to reduction of the light scattering coefficient. Usingstatistical methods it was shown that it is possible to maintain the TMP character ofthe pulp using the ATMP process. This is explained by a separation of thedefibration and the fibre development phases in refining. This separation allowsdefibration of chips to fibres and fibre bundles without addition of chemicals orincrease in refining intensity. Chemicals are applied in the fibre developmentphase only (first stage refiner). The energy demand in refining to reach tensileindex of 25 Nm/g was reduced by up to 1.1 MWh/odt (42 %) using the ATMPprocess on Loblolly pine. The energy demand in refining of White spruce, requiredto reach tensile index of 30 Nm/g, was reduced by 0.65 MWh/odt (37%).Characterizations of individual fibre properties, properties of sheets made fromlong fibre fractions and model fibre sheets with different fines fractions werecarried out. It was established that both the process equipment configuration (i.e.the mechanical pre‐treatment and the elevated refining intensity) and the additionof process chemicals in the ATMP process influence fibre properties such as external and internal fibrillation as well as the amount of split fibres. Improvementof these properties translated into improved properties of sheets, made from thelong fibre fractions of the studied pulps. The quality of the fines fraction alsoimproved. However, the mechanisms of improvement in the fines quality seem tobe different for fines, generated using improved process configuration andaddition of process chemicals. The first type of fines contributed to better bondingof model long fibre sheets through the densification of the structure. Fines whichhave been influenced by the addition of the process chemicals seemed in additionto improve bonding between long fibres by enhancing the specific bond strength.The improved fibre and fines properties also translated into better airpermeability and surface roughness of paper sheets, properties which areespecially important for supercalendered (SC) printing paper. The magnitude offibre roughening after moistening was mainly influenced by the processequipment configuration while the addition of process chemicals yielded lowestfinal surface roughness due to the lowest initial surface roughness. There was nodifference in how fines fractions from the studied processes influenced the fibreroughening. However, fines with better bonding yielded model fibre sheets withhigher PPS, probably due to their consolidation around fibre joints. Hence, thedecrease in PPS can probably be attributed to the improvements in the long fibrefraction properties while the improvement of fines quality contributed to thereduction of air permeability.The process chemicals, utilized in the ATMP process (Mg(OH)2 and H2O2) alsoproved to be an effective bleaching system. Comparable increases in brightnesscould be reached using the ATMP process and conventional tower bleaching.Maximum brightness of the pulp was reached after approximately 10 minutes ofhigh‐consistency storage after refining or 40 minutes of conventional bleaching.This study was conducted using a pilot scale refiner system operated as a batchprocess. Most of the experiments were performed using White spruce (Piceaglauca). In Paper I, Loblolly pine (Pinus taeda) was used. It is believed that theresults presented in this thesis are valid for other softwood raw materials as well,but this limitation should be considered.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sundsvall: Mid Sweden University, 2011. p. 119
Series
Mid Sweden University doctoral thesis, ISSN 1652-893X ; 108
Keywords
ATMP, TMP, Hydrogen Peroxide, Magnesium Hydroxide, Mechanical Pre-Treatment, Fibre Characterisation, Refiner Bleaching, SC Paper, Newsprint
National Category
Paper, Pulp and Fiber Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-13844 (URN)978-91-86694-34-0 (ISBN)
Public defence
2011-05-05, 10:18 (English)
Supervisors
Available from: 2011-05-27 Created: 2011-05-27 Last updated: 2012-07-30Bibliographically approved
Johansson, L., Hill, J., Gorski, D. & Axelsson, P. (2011). Improvement of energy efficiency in TMP refining by selective wood disintegration and targeted application of chemicals. Nordic Pulp & Paper Research Journal, 26(1), 31-46
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Improvement of energy efficiency in TMP refining by selective wood disintegration and targeted application of chemicals
2011 (English)In: Nordic Pulp & Paper Research Journal, ISSN 0283-2631, E-ISSN 2000-0669, Vol. 26, no 1, p. 31-46Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A pilot refining trial on Loblolly pine (Pinus taeda) was conducted using a novel process configuration called ATMP (Advanced Thermomechanical Pulp). In this process, selective wood disintegration due to mechanical pre-treatment of chips and increased refining intensity is combined with targeted application of chemicals after defibration. Standard TMP was compared to ATMP where different chemical strategies were applied. These strategies employed active chemicals known to cause sulphonation, carboxylation/oxidation and degradation of fibre components in order to assist the refining process. Main goal of the study was to evaluate the potential of decreasing the energy demand in refining evaluated at equal tensile index compared to a TMP reference. Another goal was to produce pulp where the TMP character, i.e. good optical properties combined with good bulk and strength properties, was fully preserved. The objective was also to study other quality aspects of the pulp produced using the ATMP process and compare these to properties of conventional TMP. Energy demand in refining was decreased with at least 0.6 MWh/odt compared to TMP at tensile index 25 Nm/g when ATMP concept was used. Maximum achieved reduction in the refining energy demand was 1.1 MWh/odt (42%) compared to the TMP reference at tensile index 25 Nm/g. Statistical analysis showed that pulp, produced using the ATMP process, retained all its important properties such as light scattering, density and elongation on the same level as control TMP, i.e. it had the same character. All pulps produced using the ATMP process had very low shive content. Treatment with hydrogen peroxide and magnesium hydroxide was the most successful chemical strategy tested during the pilot trial. It was most successful both in respect to improved optical properties (14 ISO % increase in brightness could be achieved by adding 25 kg/odt hydrogen peroxide in the first stage refiner) and reduction of energy demand in refining.

Keywords
ATMP; TMP; Energy reduction; Hydrogen peroxide; Magnesium hydroxide; Sodium bisulphite; Refiner bleaching
National Category
Paper, Pulp and Fiber Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-13845 (URN)10.3183/NPPRJ-2011-26-01-p031-046 (DOI)000293770200004 ()2-s2.0-79955371638 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2011-05-27 Created: 2011-05-27 Last updated: 2017-12-11Bibliographically approved
Gorski, D., Mörseburg, K., Axelsson, P. & Engstrand, P. (2011). Peroxide-based ATMP refining of spruce: energy efficiency, fibre properties and pulp quality. Nordic Pulp & Paper Research Journal, 26(1), 47-63
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Peroxide-based ATMP refining of spruce: energy efficiency, fibre properties and pulp quality
2011 (English)In: Nordic Pulp & Paper Research Journal, ISSN 0283-2631, E-ISSN 2000-0669, Vol. 26, no 1, p. 47-63Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Pilot scale refining of White spruce using a modified TMP refining process (ATMP - Advanced Thermomechanical Pulp) was studied. ATMP combines selective wood disintegration by mechanical pretreatment and refining at elevated intensity with chemical treatment after defibration (in this study hydrogen peroxide, alone and in combination with alkali). The electrical energy efficiency and pulp quality using ATMP were evaluated and compared to a conventional TMP process. One goal was to retain the combination of optical properties and strength of typical TMP. Fibre properties (structural dimensions, external and internal fibre development) as well as the amount of split fibres resulting from TMP and ATMP processes were compared. The results indicate an electrical energy efficiency improvement potential of 0.65 MWh/odt (34%) at tensile index 30 N.m/g of ATMP compared to reference TMP. All ATMP pulps retained their TMP character, i.e. the relationships between light scattering coefficient, density, elongation properties and strength that are important for printing paper. ATMP had a significantly lower content of shives and higher external and internal fibre development compared to TMP at equal energy application. The long fibre fraction of ATMP also contained significantly higher amount of split fibres. The brightness of ATMP produced with addition of hydrogen peroxide (28 kg/odt) and magnesium hydroxide (14 kg/odt) was 14 ISO % higher compared to TMP.

Keywords
ATMP; TMP; Energy reduction; Fibre characterisation; Hydrogen peroxide; Magnesium hydroxide; Refiner bleaching
National Category
Paper, Pulp and Fiber Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-13846 (URN)10.3183/NPPRJ-2011-26-01-p047-063 (DOI)000293770200005 ()2-s2.0-79955447235 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2011-05-27 Created: 2011-05-27 Last updated: 2017-12-11Bibliographically approved
Gorski, D., Mörseburg, K. & Johansson, L. (2011). Role of equipment configuration and process chemicals in peroxide-based ATMP refining of spruce. Nordic Pulp & Paper Research Journal, 26(2), 232-247
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Role of equipment configuration and process chemicals in peroxide-based ATMP refining of spruce
2011 (English)In: Nordic Pulp & Paper Research Journal, ISSN 0283-2631, E-ISSN 2000-0669, Vol. 26, no 2, p. 232-247Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Pilot scale refining of White spruce using ATMP (Advanced Thermomechanical Pulp) process was studied. Conventional TMP process, where first stage refiner was equipped with low-intensity segments, was the first reference used in the trial. Another reference was a TMP process with modified equipment configuration (ATMP (aq.)). Modifications consisted of mechanical pre-treatment of chips in Impressafiner and Fiberizer prior to first stage relining at elevated intensity. TMP and ATMP (aq.) references were compared to the ATMP (Mg+P) process which had the same equipment configuration as the ATMP (aq.) and where fibre development in refining was further enhanced using hydrogen peroxide and magnesium hydroxide. The main goal of the trial was to separate the effects of equipment configuration from the effects of process chemicals in ATMP refining. Impact on the development of individual fibre properties. properties of fines fraction. whole pulp properties and laboratory sheet properties was studied and linked to the energy efficiency in refining Electrical energy demand, needed to reach the tensile index of 30 Nm/g could be reduced by 0.42 MWh/odt (28 %) compared to conventional TMP process when mechanical pre-treatment and refining at elevated intensity (ATMP (aq.)) were utilized. Relining energy reduction was 0.49 MWh/odt (33 %) when ATMP (Mg+P) concept was used. The content of shives was considerably lower for ATMP and ATMP (aq.) pulps compared to the TMP reference. ATMP (Mg+P) also had higher brightness compared to the references, an increase by 10 ISO % for a 26 kg/odt hydrogen peroxide charge.

Keywords
ATMP; TMP; Energy reduction; Fibre characterisation; Fines; Hydrogen peroxide; Magnesium hydroxide; Refiner bleaching
National Category
Paper, Pulp and Fiber Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-13858 (URN)000294524200002 ()2-s2.0-80052377787 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2011-05-30 Created: 2011-05-30 Last updated: 2017-12-11Bibliographically approved
Gorski, D., Engstrand, P., Hill, J., Axelsson, P. & Johansson, L. (2010). Mg(OH)(2)-based hydrogen peroxide refiner bleaching: influence of extractives content in dilution water on pulp properties and energy efficiency. Appita journal, 63(3), 218-225
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Mg(OH)(2)-based hydrogen peroxide refiner bleaching: influence of extractives content in dilution water on pulp properties and energy efficiency
Show others...
2010 (English)In: Appita journal, ISSN 1038-6807, Vol. 63, no 3, p. 218-225Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Two refiner bleaching trials on TMP and SGW rejects using magnesium hydroxide and hydrogen peroxide were conducted in a reject refiner. Clear filtrate from a disc filter was used as dilution water during the first trial (normal mill operation) and fresh water was used during the second trial. Refiner bleached pulp had approximately nine %ISO higher brightness than reference pulps in both trials using a peroxide charge of 25 kg/t pulp. The brightness gain increased to 12 %ISO after high consistency storage at 755 degrees C for 30 minutes. The bleached pulp from the first trial had 10% lower tensile index compared to reference at similar refining energy. The extractives content on the surfaces of the bleached fibres (surface coverage measured by ESCA) was 20% higher compared to the unbleached reference pulp when clear filtrate was used as dilution water. Within this surface extractives content increase, the increase of triglycerides and steryl esters was largest, almost doubling in value. Acetone extraction of the pulps led to higher apparent sheet strength. The increase was equal for both the reference and the bleached samples but the bleached pulp still had inferior strength properties compared to the reference pulp. When a second trial was carried out with fresh water as dilution, much less difference in the strength properties of bleached and unbleached pulp was observed.

It is suggested that addition of alkali to the refiner caused extractives in the clear filtrate to destabilise and re-deposit onto fibre surfaces. The fact that removal of extractives with acetone did not bring the strength of bleached pulp up to the level of the reference pulp suggests that extractives may have influenced the fibre development process of the bleached pulp fibres in the refiner.

Keywords
Refiner bleaching; magnesium hydroxide; hydrogen peroxide; extractives; energy reduction
National Category
Paper, Pulp and Fiber Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-11835 (URN)000279222500010 ()2-s2.0-77956698531 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2010-07-14 Created: 2010-07-14 Last updated: 2017-12-12Bibliographically approved
Gorski, D., Hill, J., Engstrand, P. & Johansson, L. (2010). Review: Reduction of energy consumption in TMP refining through mechanical pre-treatment of wood chips. Nordic Pulp & Paper Research Journal, 25(2), 156-161
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Review: Reduction of energy consumption in TMP refining through mechanical pre-treatment of wood chips
2010 (English)In: Nordic Pulp & Paper Research Journal, ISSN 0283-2631, E-ISSN 2000-0669, Vol. 25, no 2, p. 156-161Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This review covers the effect of mechanical pre-treatment of wood chips on the energy consumption in refining and the quality of pulp. To understand the mechanisms of mechanical pre-treatment, a short description of relevant refining theory and reported effects of pre-treatment on wood morphology is given. Mechanical pre-treatment offers a chance to utilize the energy needed to defibrate chips in a more efficient way, minimizing the cyclic elastic deformations which are the main defibration mechanism in refining. Studies of fibre morphology indicate that compressive pretreatment mechanically introduces favorable weak points in the S1 and S2 fibre walls where defibration proceeds easier upon subsequent refining.Published results which cover the effect of the pretreatment on energy consumption and pulp properties are reviewed. Energy reduction of between 10% and 30% is reported in the literature. High ratio of volumetric compression is necessary. Pressurized conditions are required to ensure that the fibres are not damaged during the pre-treatment. Other effects of compressive pretreatment include a more uniform chip size and moisture content, better penetration of chemicals and removal of extractives from the chips. A list of equipment used for chip pre-compression is provided together with published results of pilot-scale and mill-scale operation.

Keywords
TMP refining; Chip pre-compression; Chip pre-treatment; Energy reduction; ATMP
National Category
Chemical Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-11886 (URN)10.3183/NPPRJ-2010-25-02-p156-161 (DOI)000279341100003 ()2-s2.0-79551553499 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2010-07-30 Created: 2010-07-30 Last updated: 2017-12-12Bibliographically approved
Gorski, D., Engstrand, P., Hill, J. & Johansson, L. (2009). Review: Reduction of energy consumption in refining through mechanical pretreatment of wood chips. In: Proceedings - 2009 International Mechanical Pulping Conference, IMPC 2009. Paper presented at 2009 International Mechanical Pulping Conference, IMPC 2009; Sundsvall; 31 May 2009 through 4 June 2009; Code 79937 (pp. 17-21).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Review: Reduction of energy consumption in refining through mechanical pretreatment of wood chips
2009 (English)In: Proceedings - 2009 International Mechanical Pulping Conference, IMPC 2009, 2009, p. 17-21Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Refining of thermomechanical pulp is a very energy-intensive process. Mechanical pretreatment of wood chips prior to refining has been shown to be able to reduce total energy consumption, facilitate removal of extractives, have positive synergies with chemical and enzymatic pretreatments and improve impregnation of chips. There are a number of publications dealing with different aspects of mechanical pretreatment but few of them give a comprehensive overview of what has been done in this field. No review articles dealing with the subject have been written. Today, mechanical pretreatment is becoming more and more common and therefore a review is important.

 

 

Keywords
Energy consumption; Mechanical pre-treatment; Pre-treatments; Total energy consumption; Wood chip
National Category
Chemical Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-11703 (URN)2-s2.0-77951132546 (Scopus ID)
Conference
2009 International Mechanical Pulping Conference, IMPC 2009; Sundsvall; 31 May 2009 through 4 June 2009; Code 79937
Available from: 2010-06-14 Created: 2010-06-14 Last updated: 2010-07-14Bibliographically approved
Gorski, D., Johansson, L. & Engstrand, P. Bleaching efficiency in peroxide-based ATMP process compared to conventional bleaching.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Bleaching efficiency in peroxide-based ATMP process compared to conventional bleaching
(English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
National Category
Paper, Pulp and Fiber Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-13850 (URN)
Available from: 2011-05-27 Created: 2011-05-27 Last updated: 2016-12-09Bibliographically approved
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