miun.sePublications
Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
BETA
Ivarsson, Lena
Publications (10 of 24) Show all publications
Ivarsson, L. (2019). What’s in it for me? - Peer observation of teaching: Experiences from a primary school in Sweden. International Journal of Learning, Teaching and Educational Research, 18(3), 128-141
Open this publication in new window or tab >>What’s in it for me? - Peer observation of teaching: Experiences from a primary school in Sweden
2019 (English)In: International Journal of Learning, Teaching and Educational Research, ISSN 1694-2493, E-ISSN 1694-2116, Vol. 18, no 3, p. 128-141Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Peer observations of teaching, POT, is a model for developing teachers to reflect on their teaching practice and discuss their ideas with colleagues. This article contributes to the knowledge of how peer observation of teaching can be used in a primary school as a model to develop teachers’ teaching practices, and highlights the challenges throughout the process. Semi-structured interviews were used for data collection and analyzed by a qualitative content analysis with a deductive approach. The results of the study confirm that peer observation of teaching is, in fact, a useful model for metacognitive improvement of teaching and learning for teachers, provided that some necessary conditions are met, for example transparency in the planning of the process, inclusion of teachers in the decision-making process, and training in the process of providing and receiving feedback.

Keywords
Learning, Observation, Peer observation of teaching (POT), Primary school, Teaching
National Category
Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-36668 (URN)10.26803/ijlter.18.3.7 (DOI)2-s2.0-85065526017 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-07-09 Created: 2019-07-09 Last updated: 2019-07-09Bibliographically approved
Boström, L. & Ivarsson, L. (2013). Good reading Enviroments for Individual Reading. Pædagogisk Psykologisk Tidsskrift, 50(5), 66-80
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Good reading Enviroments for Individual Reading
2013 (English)In: Pædagogisk Psykologisk Tidsskrift, ISSN 1903-0002, Vol. 50, no 5, p. 66-80Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The reading ability among today’s children and youth is highly discussed both nationally and internationally. The results for Swedish students, in both PIRLS and PISA, show a decrease in reading ability. There are different explanations to the decrease, for example deficiency in teaching and a reduction in the use of reading strategies. While a lot of research is being devoted to reading development, there is a lack on research showing overall constructive ways to build and maintain favorable reading environments for each individual. Our aim with this paper is to discuss what will work on an individual basis. Our research question is: Which are the key-factors that create good reading environments and maintain a sustainable reading interest on an individual level? The overall purpose of this paper is therefore to explore the field of research on early reading, with a special focus on good reading environments, individual conditions, reading styles and teaching strategies. The aim is to identify how good reading environments can be developed through children’s individual reading styles and strategies, and teacher’s awareness of teaching strategies that create an optimal platform for lifelong reading.   This paper is a conceptual paper in which a theoretical framework built on international empirical research was identified, by connecting and systematizing different parts of reading, learning and teaching.  This area is complex and complicated because it involves interactions and different learning and teaching perspectives. In this paper we present research showing that teaching reading based on individual reading styles and strategies is an effective way to ensure children’s´ achievement, interest, self-confidence, and motivation. Children’s awareness of reading strategies supported by favorable reading environments influence meta-cognition and also the ability and interest to become a skilled reader. It is also clear that teachers’ pedagogical knowledge is of great importance as well as their ability to use a variety of teaching strategies to meet the needs of every individual. This paper provides useful information unraveling concepts, methods and effects which can aid children, parents, teachers and researchers in understanding, evaluating and monitoring reading, thus having practical implications for promoting lifelong reading.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Köpenhamn: Dansk Psykologisk Forlag, 2013
Keywords
learning environments, learning strategies, reading, reading styles, self-image, teaching strategies
National Category
Pedagogy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-20714 (URN)
Available from: 2013-12-14 Created: 2013-12-14 Last updated: 2016-09-29Bibliographically approved
Boström, L. & Ivarsson, L. (2013). Good Reading Environments for Individual Reading Development. In: Boström, L., Augustsson, G., Evans, C., Charlesworth, Z. & Cool, E. (Ed.), Good Reading Environments for Individual Reading Development: . Paper presented at 18 International ELSIN- conference. Building Learning Capacity for Life. Brno: Tribun, EU
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Good Reading Environments for Individual Reading Development
2013 (English)In: Good Reading Environments for Individual Reading Development / [ed] Boström, L., Augustsson, G., Evans, C., Charlesworth, Z. & Cool, E., Brno: Tribun, EU , 2013Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The reading ability among today’s children and youth is highly discussed both nationally and internationally. The results for Swedish students, in both PIRLS and PISA, show a decrease in reading ability. There are different explanations to the decrease, for example deficiency in teaching and a reduction in the use of reading strategies. While a lot of research is being devoted to reading development, there is a lack on research showing overall constructive ways to build and maintain favorable reading environments for each individual. Our aim with this paper is to discuss what will work on an individual basis. Our research question is: Which are the key-factors that create good reading environments and maintain a sustainable reading interest on an individual level? The overall purpose of this paper is therefore to explore the field of research on early reading, with a special focus on good reading environments, individual conditions, reading styles and teaching strategies. The aim is to identify how good reading environments can be developed through children’s individual reading styles and strategies, and teacher’s awareness of teaching strategies that create an optimal platform for lifelong reading.   This paper is a conceptual paper in which a theoretical framework built on international empirical research was identified, by connecting and systematizing different parts of reading, learning and teaching.  This area is complex and complicated because it involves interactions and different learning and teaching perspectives. In this paper we present research showing that teaching reading based on individual reading styles and strategies is an effective way to ensure children’s´ achievement, interest, self-confidence, and motivation. Children’s awareness of reading strategies supported by favorable reading environments influence meta-cognition and also the ability and interest to become a skilled reader. It is also clear that teachers’ pedagogical knowledge is of great importance as well as their ability to use a variety of teaching strategies to meet the needs of every individual. This paper provides useful information unraveling concepts, methods and effects which can aid children, parents, teachers and researchers in understanding, evaluating and monitoring reading, thus having practical implications for promoting lifelong reading.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Brno: Tribun, EU, 2013
Keywords
learning environments, learning strategies, reading, reading styles, self-image, teaching strategies
National Category
Specific Languages
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-19657 (URN)
Conference
18 International ELSIN- conference. Building Learning Capacity for Life
Available from: 2013-07-29 Created: 2013-07-29 Last updated: 2018-01-11Bibliographically approved
Shabes, V., Troshchenkova, E., Potapova, T., Ivarsson, L., Damber, U. & Bostedt, G. (2012). Cognitive linguistic basis for experimental study of Russian and Swedish value systems. Problems of Cognitive Linguistics (2), 67-78
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cognitive linguistic basis for experimental study of Russian and Swedish value systems
Show others...
2012 (Russian)In: Problems of Cognitive Linguistics, ISSN 1812-3228, no 2, p. 67-78Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Moskva: , 2012
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-17298 (URN)
Available from: 2012-11-01 Created: 2012-11-01 Last updated: 2013-02-12Bibliographically approved
Shabes, V., Troshchenkova, E., Potapova, T., Ivarsson, L., Damber, U. & Bostedt, G. (2012). Complex Values in Different Cultures: Some Research Results of Psycholinguistic Experiments with Russian and Swedish Students. US-China Education Review, 2(1), 70-83
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Complex Values in Different Cultures: Some Research Results of Psycholinguistic Experiments with Russian and Swedish Students
Show others...
2012 (English)In: US-China Education Review, ISSN 1548-6613, E-ISSN 1930-1529, Vol. 2, no 1, p. 70-83Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In the article on the basis of the psycholinguistic experimental data obtained in 2009-2010 from Russian and Swedish students, we consider internal features of several complex values (“Harmony”, “Freedom”, “Democracy”, “Tolerance” and “Patriotism”) and analyze their external systemic organization, taking into account both specificity of the two cultures and gender specifics. We argue that value concepts are hierarchically organized, forming different generalization levels from the simple to the more complex ones with intricate overlapping among different complex values within the system. This research is a stage in a complex experimental work aimed at comparing Russian and Swedish values (the project on Swedish Institute grant). 

Keywords
value system, complex value, psycholinguistic experiment, cultural similarities/differences, gender similarities/differences
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-17297 (URN)
Available from: 2012-11-01 Created: 2012-11-01 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved
Damber, U., Bostedt, G., Ivarsson, L., Shabes, V., Troschenskova, E. & Potapova, T. (2011). An experimental study of Russian and Swedish value systems.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>An experimental study of Russian and Swedish value systems
Show others...
2011 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The purpose of this study was to develop a method comparing Russian and Swedish value systems with the overarching aim to increase the understanding in intercultural communication. Value systems, as organized systems of nationally specific social concepts, are viewed as part of the cognitive, mental representations determining the behaviour of both individuals and communities. In comparative studies of value systems concepts in the national languages are often translated into English. Our Russian-Swedish project has indicated that similar national concepts, when translated into English, expose significant differences in their connotations. For example, when comparing the Swedish and Russian translations of ‘security’, much of the nationally specific contents are lost, thus, making data invalid. To overcome this problem, methods were developed to obtain comparable data, by use of experimental design, employing Russian and Swedish university students as informants. In our presentation we will explicate how simple value concepts coinciding for the two cultures were obtained and how differences in similar concepts were identified. We will describe the overall structure of the multilayer value systems of both countries, where similarities and differences related to gender and ethnicity, are made visible. The methodology, results and presumptive usages of these methods will be presented.

Keywords
Values, system, culture, methodology, comparison, similarity, difference, graded standard.
National Category
General Language Studies and Linguistics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-13742 (URN)
Available from: 2011-12-11 Created: 2011-05-04 Last updated: 2018-01-12Bibliographically approved
Thombs, M., Ivarsson, L. & Gillis, M. (2011). Building Bridges Across the Atlantic: The Impact of Technology Facilitated Classroom Partnership on Cultural Understanding and Student Motivation in Language Acquisition. In: Bhattacharya, M., Mach, M., & Moallem, M. (Ed.), Emerging Technologies in Learning: Impact on Cognition and Culture (pp. 35-44). AACE Publication
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Building Bridges Across the Atlantic: The Impact of Technology Facilitated Classroom Partnership on Cultural Understanding and Student Motivation in Language Acquisition
2011 (English)In: Emerging Technologies in Learning: Impact on Cognition and Culture / [ed] Bhattacharya, M., Mach, M., & Moallem, M., AACE Publication , 2011, p. 35-44Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

With ever-increasing globalization of economies and societies, educators recognize that proficiency in multiple languages and insight into cultural differences are essential components of sound curricula. Participation in international classroom learning partnerships is one way to accomplish these goals. This chapter describes an ongoing collaboration, named Bridges Across the Atlantic, between elementary students in Sweden and the United States. Students work together and share ideas on various projects in math, science, social studies, and literacy. Using traditional and emerging technologies, they are able to experience first hand the language and culture of their peers on the other side of the Atlantic. Advice is given on establishing similar projects, setting classroom learning goals, and choosing appropriate technology resources. Research implications are described and topics for further research are suggested. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
AACE Publication, 2011
Keywords
Language learning, cultural understanding, international classroom partnerships, emerging technology, TPACK (technological pedagogical content knowledge)
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-17296 (URN)
Available from: 2012-11-01 Created: 2012-11-01 Last updated: 2012-11-02Bibliographically approved
Thombs, M., Ivarsson, L. & Gilis, M. (2011). Building Bridges Across the Atlantic: The Impact of Technology Facilitated Classroom Partnership on Cultural Understanding and Student Motivation in Language Acquisition.. In: Bhattacharya Madhumita, Mach Nada & Moallem Mahnaz (Ed.), Emerging Technologies in Learning: Impact on Cognition and Culture. AACE - Association for the Advancement of Computing Education
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Building Bridges Across the Atlantic: The Impact of Technology Facilitated Classroom Partnership on Cultural Understanding and Student Motivation in Language Acquisition.
2011 (English)In: Emerging Technologies in Learning: Impact on Cognition and Culture / [ed] Bhattacharya Madhumita, Mach Nada & Moallem Mahnaz, AACE - Association for the Advancement of Computing Education , 2011Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

With ever-increasing globalization of economies and societies, educators recognize that proficiency in multiple languages and insight into cultural differences are essential components of sound curricula. Participation in international classroom learning partnerships is one way to accomplish these goals.  This chapter describes an ongoing collaboration, named Bridges Across the Atlantic, between elementary students in Sweden and the United States. Students work together and share ideas on various projects in math, science, social studies, and literacy. Using traditional and emerging technologies, they are able to experience first hand the language and culture of their peers on the other side of the Atlantic. Advice is given on establishing similar projects, setting classroom learning goals, and choosing appropriate technology resources.  Research implications are described and topics for further research are suggested.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
AACE - Association for the Advancement of Computing Education, 2011
Keywords
Language learning, cultural understanding, international classroom partnerships, emerging technology, TPACK (technological pedagogical content knowledge)
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-14746 (URN)
Available from: 2011-11-16 Created: 2011-11-16 Last updated: 2014-07-08Bibliographically approved
Damber, U. & Ivarsson, L. (2011). Dyslexic but Determined: A Qualitative Study of Seven Dyslexic Swedish Student Teachers. Paper presented at EARLI, Exeter, August 30-September 2.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Dyslexic but Determined: A Qualitative Study of Seven Dyslexic Swedish Student Teachers
2011 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This article takes its starting point in the UN Declaration of Human Rights, where everyone’s right to professional education is stated. Seven Swedish dyslexic student teachers were interviewed in depth about how they perceived their educational trajectories from childhood and onwards, and how their present studying situation was perceived. How and when did they get their diagnosis and which effects did it have? How did they perceive the compensatory support provided by the university and what further needs to support their academic performance did they express? Along with the answers to these questions, a discussion about the deficit discourse versus acknowledgement of the strengths of the dyslexic students will follow. The students’ self-image linked to the reactions to the students’ reading and writing problems and received compensatory aid, both at home, in school and at university, will be analyzed. Issues like the role of the diagnosis, impact of socio-economic background factors, implications of both compulsory school teachers’ and university teachers’ lack of sufficient knowledge of how to support dyslexic students, will also be discussed. Finally, the supportive role of the student counselor will be highlighted.

Keywords
dyslexia, higher education, deficit discourse, diagnosis, slow reading, compensatory support
National Category
Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-14764 (URN)
Conference
EARLI, Exeter, August 30-September 2
Available from: 2011-11-17 Created: 2011-11-17 Last updated: 2012-01-22Bibliographically approved
Damber, U., Ivarsson, L., Trotchenskova, E. & Potapova, T. (2011). Gender differences in value systems exposed by Russian and Swedish university students. Paper presented at IACSEE, Bath, Great Britain, June 28-30.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Gender differences in value systems exposed by Russian and Swedish university students
2011 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

In this study we pinpoint the similarities and differences between students at a Russian university and a Swedish university regarding the students’ value-systems. Which similarities and which differences are there between male Swedish students and male Russian students and which differences are there between the female students in the two countries? Our interest was directed towards the gender differences between the two countries. A method, employing three phases was developed for analyses of value systems in the two countries. Students, who as a category, often challenge existing value-systems, were chosen as informants.  Student samples from each country, in number varying between 63-100 respondents, provided data in the three sub-studies. The results indicated that similar national concepts, when translated into English, exposed significant differences in their connotations, a phenomenon which will be discussed in relation to implications for intercultural communication. In particular, the concepts of democracy and gender equality will be highlighted. Differences and similarities related to gender and nationality constitute the bulk of the discussion. A major finding was that concepts describing close inter-personal relations, such as friendship and love, were cross-nationally higher rated than values more distant from the individual’s private life world, such as democracy and equal rights.  

Keywords
Russian students, Swedish students, value systems, gender differences, different connotations, cross-national comparisons
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-14763 (URN)
Conference
IACSEE, Bath, Great Britain, June 28-30
Available from: 2011-11-17 Created: 2011-11-17 Last updated: 2012-01-22Bibliographically approved
Organisations

Search in DiVA

Show all publications