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Champoux-Larsson, M.-F. & Dylman, A. (2019). A prosodic bias, not an advantage, in bilinguals' interpretation of emotional prosody. Bilingualism: Language and Cognition, 22(2), 416-424
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A prosodic bias, not an advantage, in bilinguals' interpretation of emotional prosody
2019 (English)In: Bilingualism: Language and Cognition, ISSN 1366-7289, E-ISSN 1469-1841, Vol. 22, no 2, p. 416-424Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A bilingual advantage has been found in prosody understanding in pre-school children. To understand this advantage better, we asked 73 children (6-8 years) to identify the emotional valence of spoken words, based on either semantics or emotional prosody (which were either consistent or discrepant with each other). Bilingual experience ranged from no to equal exposure to and use of two languages. Both age and bilingual experience predicted accurate identification of prosody, particularly for trials where the semantics were discrepant with the targeted prosody. Bilingual experience, but not age, predicted a prosodic bias, meaning that participants had more difficulty ignoring the irrelevant discrepant prosody when the task was to identify the semantics of the word. The decline of a semantic bias was predicted by age and bilingual experience together. Our results suggest that previous findings on the bilingual advantage in prosody processing may in fact be driven by a prosodic bias.

Keywords
semantic bias, prosodic bias, developmental differences, bilingualism
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-33708 (URN)10.1017/S1366728918000640 (DOI)000461558600012 ()
Available from: 2018-06-05 Created: 2018-06-05 Last updated: 2019-05-20Bibliographically approved
Champoux-Larsson, M.-F. & Dylman, A. (2019). Bilinguals’ use of semantic and prosodic cues for emotion inference in speech. In: : . Paper presented at XIV International Symposium of Psycholinguistics, Tarragona, Spain, 10-13 April, 2019.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Bilinguals’ use of semantic and prosodic cues for emotion inference in speech
2019 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Recently, a study by Champoux-Larsson and Dylman (2018) showed that the bilingual advantage previously found in the use of emotional prosodic cues in children to infer a speaker’s emotional state (e.g., Yow & Markman, 2011) was driven by a bias towards prosody. Namely, the higher level of bilingualism the participants in ChampouxLarsson and Dylman (2018) had, the more they had difficulty ignoring prosodic emotional cues in spoken words even when they were asked to focus on the semantics of the words. While Misono et al. (1997) found that monolingual adults rely on both semantic and prosodic cues to determine emotion in speech equally, it is not known yet whether this also is true for bilingual adults. In other words, it is unclear whether the prosodic bias found in bilingual children withstands even in adulthood for bilinguals. Thus, we present a study where adults with varying levels of bilingualism were asked to determine the emotional valence of utterances based on the participant’s general impression (i.e., without specifying which cue to use), based on the utterance’s emotional prosody or based on its semantic content. The spoken words’ semantics was positive, negative or neutral and the words were uttered with either a congruent emotional prosody or with an incongruent emotional prosody. Data is currently being prepared for analysis and results will be available within the coming weeks.

Keywords
emotional prosody, prosodic bias, bilingualism, emotion
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-36022 (URN)
Conference
XIV International Symposium of Psycholinguistics, Tarragona, Spain, 10-13 April, 2019
Available from: 2019-04-19 Created: 2019-04-19 Last updated: 2019-06-19Bibliographically approved
Champoux-Larsson, M.-F. & Dylman, A. (2019). Different measurements of bilingualism and their effect on performance on a Simon task.. In: : . Paper presented at Capturing and Quantifying Individual Differences in Bilingualism, Tromsø, Norway, September 2nd-3rd, 2019.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Different measurements of bilingualism and their effect on performance on a Simon task.
2019 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Refereed)
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-37201 (URN)
Conference
Capturing and Quantifying Individual Differences in Bilingualism, Tromsø, Norway, September 2nd-3rd, 2019
Available from: 2019-09-12 Created: 2019-09-12 Last updated: 2019-09-16Bibliographically approved
Champoux-Larsson, M.-F., Dylman, A., Örnkloo, H. & Esteves, F. (2019). Identification of facial expressions of emotion by 4-year-old children from different linguistic environments. International Journal of Bilingualism, 23(5), 1208-1219
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Identification of facial expressions of emotion by 4-year-old children from different linguistic environments
2019 (English)In: International Journal of Bilingualism, ISSN 1367-0069, E-ISSN 1756-6878, Vol. 23, no 5, p. 1208-1219Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The current study investigated the identification of facial expressions of emotion, a socio-emotional task that has not previously been examined in children from different linguistic environments. Eighty-four 4-year-olds growing up in one of three linguistic environments (monolingual, dominant bilingual, balanced bilingual) performed a task where they identified facial expressions (happiness, anger, sadness, fear). Accuracy was analysed with a mixed-design analysis of variance using group (monolinguals, dominant bilinguals and balanced bilinguals) and emotion (happy, angry, sad and scared) as between- and within-group variables, respectively. Our results showed a main effect of emotion, but there was no main effect of group. This suggests that 4-year-olds’ linguistic environment does not affect performance on an identification of facial expressions task. This study was the first to investigate the identification of facial expressions of emotion in children coming from different linguistic environments. As the socio-emotional development of bilinguals is not yet well understood, especially regarding the visual perception of emotions, this study is amongst the first to contribute to this area of research. Our results are therefore of significance as a building block for additional studies that should explore the visual perception of emotions in other types of tasks and populations.

Keywords
Facial expression of emotion, socio-emotional development, linguistic environment, language exposure, emotion perception
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-33781 (URN)10.1177/1367006918781069 (DOI)2-s2.0-85048768132 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-06-14 Created: 2018-06-14 Last updated: 2019-09-11Bibliographically approved
Dylman, A. & Champoux-Larsson, M.-F. (2019). No foreign language effect in decision making for culturally influential second languages. In: : . Paper presented at International Convention of Psychological Science (ICPS 2019), Paris 7-9 March 2019.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>No foreign language effect in decision making for culturally influential second languages
2019 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

We report two experiments investigating the foreign language effect (FLe) for culturally influential languages. Across two experimental paradigms, we found no FLe for Swedish participants when using their second language English. This highlights the limitations of the FLe and suggests that it may not be as robust as previously thought.

National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-35792 (URN)
Conference
International Convention of Psychological Science (ICPS 2019), Paris 7-9 March 2019
Available from: 2019-03-14 Created: 2019-03-14 Last updated: 2019-03-19Bibliographically approved
Dylman, A. & Bjärtå, A. (2019). When your heart is in your mouth: the effect of second language use on negative emotions. Cognition & Emotion, 33(6), 1284-1290
Open this publication in new window or tab >>When your heart is in your mouth: the effect of second language use on negative emotions
2019 (English)In: Cognition & Emotion, ISSN 0269-9931, E-ISSN 1464-0600, Vol. 33, no 6, p. 1284-1290Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Research on bilingualism and emotions has shown stronger emotional responses in the native language (L1) compared to a foreign language. We investigated the potential of purposeful second language (L2) use as a means of decreasing the experience of psychological distress. Native Swedish speakers read and answered questions about negative and neutral texts in their L1 (Swedish) and their L2 (English) and were asked to rate their level of distress before or after the questions. The texts and associated questions were either written in the same (within-language), or different languages (cross-language). We found that within-language trials when the text was written in participants’ native language (Swedish–Swedish) resulted in an increase of distress, whilst cross-language trials (Swedish–English) resulted in a decrease of distress. This implies that purposeful second language use can diminish levels of distress experienced following a negative event encoded in one's first language.

Keywords
Second language processing, L2 use, negative emotions, bilingualism
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-34955 (URN)10.1080/02699931.2018.1540403 (DOI)2-s2.0-85056117790 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-11-27 Created: 2018-11-27 Last updated: 2019-06-12Bibliographically approved
Champoux-Larsson, M.-F., Dylman, A. & Esteves, F. (2018). Bilingualism and social flexibility. In: : . Paper presented at Social Communication Across the Lifespan, University of Kent, Canterbury, England, 27th-29th June, 2018.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Bilingualism and social flexibility
2018 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Refereed)
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-34043 (URN)
Conference
Social Communication Across the Lifespan, University of Kent, Canterbury, England, 27th-29th June, 2018
Available from: 2018-06-29 Created: 2018-06-29 Last updated: 2018-07-03Bibliographically approved
Champoux-Larsson, M.-F., Dylman, A. & Esteves, F. (2018). Bilinguals' social flexibility. In: : . Paper presented at International Conference on Bilingualism and Cognition, Pilani Goa Campus, India,November 1-3, 2018.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Bilinguals' social flexibility
2018 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-34848 (URN)
Conference
International Conference on Bilingualism and Cognition, Pilani Goa Campus, India,November 1-3, 2018
Available from: 2018-11-02 Created: 2018-11-02 Last updated: 2018-11-14Bibliographically approved
Dylman, A. & Kikutani, M. (2018). The role of semantic processing in reading Japanese orthographies: an investigation using a script-switch paradigm. Reading and writing, 31(3), 503-531
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The role of semantic processing in reading Japanese orthographies: an investigation using a script-switch paradigm
2018 (English)In: Reading and writing, ISSN 0922-4777, E-ISSN 1573-0905, Vol. 31, no 3, p. 503-531Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Research on Japanese reading has generally indicated that processing of the logographic script Kanji primarily involves whole-word lexical processing and follows a semantics-to-phonology route, while the two phonological scripts Hiragana and Katakana (collectively called Kana) are processed via a sub-lexical route, and more in a phonology-to-semantics manner. Therefore, switching between the two scripts often involves switching between two reading processes, which results in a delayed response for the second script (a script switch cost). In the present study, participants responded to pairs of words that were written either in the same orthography (within-script), or in two different Japanese orthographies (cross-script), switching either between Kanji and Hiragana, or between Katakana and Hiragana. They were asked to read the words aloud (Experiments 1 and 3) and to make a semantic decision about them (Experiments 2 and 4). In contrast to initial predictions, a clear switch cost was observed when participants switched between the two Kana scripts, while script switch costs were less consistent when participants switched between Kanji and Hiragana. This indicates that there are distinct processes involved in reading of the two types of Kana, where Hiragana reading appears to bear some similarities to Kanji processing. This suggests that the role of semantic processing in Hiragana (but not Katakana) reading is more prominent than previously thought and thus, Hiragana is not likely to be processed strictly phonologically. 

Keywords
Japanese orthographies, Japanese reading, Reading aloud, Script switching, Semantic decision
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-32287 (URN)10.1007/s11145-017-9796-3 (DOI)000424482100001 ()29456291 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85033398424 (Scopus ID)
Note

First Online: 08 November 2017

Available from: 2017-12-06 Created: 2017-12-06 Last updated: 2019-08-06Bibliographically approved
Dylman, A. & Barry, C. (2018). When having two names facilitates lexical selection: Similar results in the picture-word task from translation distractors in bilinguals and synonym distractors in monolinguals. Cognition, 171(February 2018), 151-171
Open this publication in new window or tab >>When having two names facilitates lexical selection: Similar results in the picture-word task from translation distractors in bilinguals and synonym distractors in monolinguals
2018 (English)In: Cognition, ISSN 0010-0277, E-ISSN 1873-7838, Vol. 171, no February 2018, p. 151-171Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We report five experiments using the picture-word task to examine lexical selection by comparing the effects of translation distractors in bilinguals and synonym distractors in monolinguals. Three groups of bilinguals named objects in their L1 or L2, and English monolinguals named objects using common names (e.g., DOG = “dog”) or, in a novel manipulation, using synonymous alternative names (e.g., DOG = “hound”, GLASSES = “spectacles”). All studies produced strikingly similar results. When bilinguals named in L1, there was a small facilitation effect from translation distractors, but larger facilitation when they named in L2. When monolinguals produced common names, there was no reliable effect from synonym distractors, but facilitation when they produced alternative names. (There were also strong identity facilitation effects in all naming conditions.) We discuss the relevance of these results for the debate concerning the role of competition in lexical selection and propose that for speech production there are direct facilitatory connections between the lexical representations of translations in bilinguals (and between synonyms in monolinguals). The effects of synonyms in monolinguals appear to “simulate” the effects found for translations in bilinguals, which suggest that there are commonalities in monolingual and bilingual lexical selection.

Keywords
Lexical selection, Picture-word task, Bilingual word production, Naming
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-32329 (URN)10.1016/j.cognition.2017.09.014 (DOI)000427208300014 ()29172105 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85034754893 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-12-07 Created: 2017-12-07 Last updated: 2018-04-03Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-5545-1058

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