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Belfrage, Henrik
Publications (10 of 41) Show all publications
Storey, J., Kropp, P. R., Hart, D. S., Belfrage, H. & Strand, S. (2014). Assessment and Management of Risk for Intimate Partner Violence by Police Officers. Using the Brief Spousal Assault Form for the Evaluation of Risk (B-SAFER).. Criminal justice and behavior, 41(2), 256-271
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Assessment and Management of Risk for Intimate Partner Violence by Police Officers. Using the Brief Spousal Assault Form for the Evaluation of Risk (B-SAFER).
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2014 (English)In: Criminal justice and behavior, ISSN 0093-8548, E-ISSN 1552-3594, Vol. 41, no 2, p. 256-271Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The management of intimate partner violence (IPV) typically falls to police. For assistance, officers are increasingly using violence risk assessment tools like the Brief Spousal Assault Form for the Evaluation of Risk (B-SAFER). This study replicates the methodology of Belfrage et al. but examines the B-SAFER as used by Swedish police officers when assessing and managing IPV. Results revealed a positive relationship between risk and management. Total scores and overall risk ratings predicted recidivism (AUC [Area under the curve] = .70 and .69, respectively). Finally, a pattern where management recommendations were associated with decreased recidivism in high risk perpetrators but increased recidivism in low risk perpetrators was found. Results validate the use of the B-SAFER by police and reveal mostly comparable findings between the B-SAFER and the Spousal Assault Risk Assessment Guide, as examined by Belfrage et al., but suggest that the B-SAFER may be better suited for police.

Keyword
B-SAFER, intimate partner violence, police, risk assessment, risk management
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-20672 (URN)10.1177/0093854813503960 (DOI)000329197900007 ()2-s2.0-84891590140 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2013-12-13 Created: 2013-12-13 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
Laurell, J., Belfrage, H. & Hellstrom, A. (2014). Deceptive behaviour and instrumental violence among psychopathic and non-psychopathic violent forensic psychiatric patients. Psychology, Crime and Law, 20(5), 467-479
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Deceptive behaviour and instrumental violence among psychopathic and non-psychopathic violent forensic psychiatric patients
2014 (English)In: Psychology, Crime and Law, ISSN 1068-316X, E-ISSN 1477-2744, Vol. 20, no 5, p. 467-479Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Deceptive behaviour and instrumental violence are well-known psychopathic features and as such play important roles in the assessment of psychopathy. This study examined first, the nature of the violence committed by offenders that have been admitted to forensic psychiatric care and whether scores on the Psychopathy Checklist: Screening Version (PCL:SV), Part 1, were associated with the instrumentality of violence. Second, we examined the proneness of offenders to re-frame the instrumentality in their past violent crimes, and whether this was associated with scores on the PCL:SV. The results show that the PCL:SV, Part 1 (interpersonal/affective features), was positively related to the officially coded instrumentality of the violent crimes. As expected, this association disappeared when the instrumentality was self-reported. However, the majority of the patients tended to exaggerate the reactivity of their violent crimes when it was self-reported, indicating that most offenders, independently of level of psychopathy, used deception when questioned about the characteristics of their past violent crimes. The reasons for, and implications of, the use of deception are discussed.

Keyword
instrumental violence, forensic psychiatric patients, psychopathy checklist screening version (PCL:SV), deception, psychopathy
National Category
Psychiatry Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-22006 (URN)10.1080/1068316X.2013.793341 (DOI)000334722600004 ()2-s2.0-84899410241 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2014-06-04 Created: 2014-05-28 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
Douglas, K. S., Hart, S. D., Webster, C. D., Belfrage, H., Guy, L. S. & Wilson, C. M. (2014). Historical-Clinical-Risk Management-20, Version 3 (HCR-20V3): Development and Overview. International Journal of Forensic Mental Health, 13(2), 93-108
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Historical-Clinical-Risk Management-20, Version 3 (HCR-20V3): Development and Overview
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2014 (English)In: International Journal of Forensic Mental Health, ISSN 1932-9903, Vol. 13, no 2, p. 93-108Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The HCR-20 Version 3 (HCR-20V3) was published in 2013, after several years of development and revision work. It replaces Version 2, published in 1997, on which there have been more than 200 disseminations based on more than 33,000 cases across 25 countries. This article explains (1) why a revision was necessary, (2) the steps we took in the revision process, (3) key changes between Version 2 and Version 3, and (4) an overview of HCR-20V3's risk factors and administration steps. Recommendations for evaluating Version 3 are provided. © 2014 International Association of Forensic Mental Health Services.

Keyword
violence risk assessment
National Category
Forensic Science Psychiatry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-22616 (URN)10.1080/14999013.2014.906519 (DOI)000343184000002 ()2-s2.0-84901237793 (Scopus ID)
Note

Correspondence Address: Douglas, K. S.; Department of Psychology, Simon Fraser University, 8888 University Drive, Burnaby, BC, V5A 1S6, Canada; email: douglask@sfu.ca

Available from: 2014-10-10 Created: 2014-08-20 Last updated: 2014-11-17Bibliographically approved
Douglas, K. S. & Belfrage, H. (2014). Interrater Reliability and Concurrent Validity of the HCR-20 Version 3. International Journal of Forensic Mental Health, 13(2), 130-139
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Interrater Reliability and Concurrent Validity of the HCR-20 Version 3
2014 (English)In: International Journal of Forensic Mental Health, ISSN 1932-9903, Vol. 13, no 2, p. 130-139Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We evaluated the interrater reliability and concurrent validity of the HCR-20 Version 3 (HCR-20V3). Three sets of ratings were completed by experienced clinicians for 35 forensic psychiatric patients, for both HCR-20 Versions 2 and 3. Reliability analyses focused on ratings of the presence of Version 3 risk factors, presence of Version 3 risk factor sub-items, relevance ratings for Version 3 risk factors, and Version 3 summary risk ratings for future violence. Concurrent validity analyses focused on the correlational association between Versions 2 and 3 in terms of the number of risk factors present. Findings indicated that Versions 2 and 3 were strongly correlated (.69 -.90). Interrater reliability was consistently excellent for the presence of risk factors and for summary risk ratings. The majority of relevance and sub-item ratings were in the good to excellent range, although there was a minority of such ratings in the fair or poor categories. Findings support the concurrent validity and interrater reliability of HCR-20V3. Implications for use of HCR-20V3 by professionals and agencies are discussed. © 2014 International Association of Forensic Mental Health Services.

Keyword
HCR-20 Version 3, violence risk assessment
National Category
Forensic Science Psychiatry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-22617 (URN)10.1080/14999013.2014.908429 (DOI)000343184000005 ()2-s2.0-84901242822 (Scopus ID)
Note

Correspondence Address: Douglas, K. S.; Simon Fraser University, 8888 University Drive, Burnaby, BC, V5A 1S6, Canada; email: douglask@sfu.ca

Available from: 2014-10-10 Created: 2014-08-20 Last updated: 2014-11-17Bibliographically approved
Belfrage, H., Strand, S., Storey, J. E., Gibas, A. L., Kropp, P. R. & Hart, S. D. (2012). Assessment and management of risk for intimate partner violence by police officers using the Spousal Assault Risk Assessment Guide. Law and human behavior, 36(1), 60-67
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Assessment and management of risk for intimate partner violence by police officers using the Spousal Assault Risk Assessment Guide
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2012 (English)In: Law and human behavior, ISSN 0147-7307, E-ISSN 1573-661X, Vol. 36, no 1, p. 60-67Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Intimate partner violence (IPV) is a crime that is present in all countries, seriously impacts victims, and demands a great deal of time and resources from the criminal justice system. The current study examined the use of the Spousal Assault Risk Assessment Guide, 2nd ed. (SARA; Kropp, Hart, Webster, & Eaves, 1995), a structured professional judgment risk assessment and management tool for IPV, by police officers in Sweden over a follow-up of 18 months. SARA risk assessments had significant predictive validity with respect to risk management recommendations made by police, as well as with recidivism as indexed by subsequent contacts with police. Risk management mediated the association between risk assessment and recidivism: High levels of intervention were associated with decreased recidivism in high risk cases, but with increased recidivism in low risk cases. The findings support the potential utility of police-based risk assessment and management of IPV, and in particular the belief that appropriately structured risk assessment and management decisions can prevent violence.

National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-17548 (URN)10.1037/h0093948 (DOI)000302724500007 ()22471386 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84865594985 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2013-12-13 Created: 2012-12-01 Last updated: 2017-10-20Bibliographically approved
Belfrage, H. & Strand, S. (2012). Measuring the Outcome of Structured Spousal Violence Risk Assessments Using the B-SAFER: Risk in Relation to Recidivism and Intervention. Behavioral sciences & the law (Print), 30(4), 420-430
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Measuring the Outcome of Structured Spousal Violence Risk Assessments Using the B-SAFER: Risk in Relation to Recidivism and Intervention
2012 (English)In: Behavioral sciences & the law (Print), ISSN 0735-3936, E-ISSN 1099-0798, Vol. 30, no 4, p. 420-430Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In this study, 216 risk assessments conducted by law enforcement officers in a suburb of Stockholm using the Brief Spousal Assault Form for the Evaluation of Risk (B-SAFER) were followed up and correlated to both recidivism and type of protective actions implemented by the police. The results showed high recidivism rates across all risk categories, except in the highest risk group, where the recidivism rate was significantly lower. This finding suggests a poor, and even negative, predictive power of the police risk assessments: the higher the police-assessed risk, the lower the recidivism rate. However, it was clear that the police did very little, or nothing, in cases not assessed as high risk. All resources appear to have been directed to the high-risk cases, which seems to have had a preventive effect. Our results point to the importance of studying the nature and extent of protective actions taken in response to risk assessment, before drawing conclusions about the predictive validity of risk assessment instruments. Copyright (C) 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-17063 (URN)10.1002/bsl.2019 (DOI)000307101500004 ()2-s2.0-84864768298 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2012-10-04 Created: 2012-09-26 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved
Belfrage, H., Strand, S., Ekman, L. & Hasselborg, A.-K. (2012). The PATRIARCH. Six years experiences from the use of a checklist for the assessment of risk for patriarchal violence with honor as motive.. International Journal of Police Science and Management, 14(1), 20-29
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The PATRIARCH. Six years experiences from the use of a checklist for the assessment of risk for patriarchal violence with honor as motive.
2012 (English)In: International Journal of Police Science and Management, ISSN 1461-3557, E-ISSN 1478-1603, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 20-29Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Few crimes are as complicated to investigate and understand as honour-based crimes.The planning and execution often involves multiple family members, usually without personality disorders or major mental disorders, and can include mothers, sisters, brothers, male cousins, uncles and grand- fathers whose actions are by many, themselves included, considered as good or necessary. Invest- igations often have to be carried out trans- national, involving many authorities and sometimes several countries. This paper describes the process of developing an evidence-based check- list which has been used for six years in Sweden

as an aid for law enforcement and social author- ities in cases with suspected risk for honour-based violence. Data from 56 recent cases are presented and discussed.

National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-15543 (URN)
Projects
Susanne Strand
Available from: 2011-12-20 Created: 2011-12-20 Last updated: 2017-12-08Bibliographically approved
Selenius, H., Hellström, Å. & Belfrage, H. (2011). Aggression and Risk of Future Violence in Forensic Psychiatric Patients with and without Dyslexia. Dyslexia, 17(2), 201-206
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Aggression and Risk of Future Violence in Forensic Psychiatric Patients with and without Dyslexia
2011 (English)In: Dyslexia, ISSN 1076-9242, E-ISSN 1099-0909, Vol. 17, no 2, p. 201-206Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Dyslexia does not cause criminal behaviour, but it may worsen aggressive behaviour tendencies. In this study, aggressive behaviour and risk of future violence were compared between forensic psychiatric patients with and without dyslexia. Dyslexia was assessed using the Swedish phonological processing battery 'The Pigeon'. The patients filled in the Aggression Questionnaire, and trained assessors performed the risk assessments using HCR-20 version 2. Patients with dyslexia self-reported more aggressive behaviour compared with those without dyslexia. There was only a nearly significant tendency (p = 0.06) for the patients with dyslexia to receive higher scores in the HCR-20 compared with the patients without dyslexia, and phonological processing skills did not significantly predict aggression or risk of future violence. However, regression analyses demonstrated that poor phonological processing skills are a significant predictor of anger, which in turn significantly predicts risk of future violence. Copyright (C) 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Keyword
dyslexia, adults, phonological awareness, aggression
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-14180 (URN)10.1002/dys.425 (DOI)000289639500006 ()2-s2.0-79955007461 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2011-07-19 Created: 2011-07-19 Last updated: 2017-12-08Bibliographically approved
Laurell, J., Belfrage, H. & Hellström, Å. (2010). Facets on the psychopathy checklist screening version and instrumental violence in forensic psychiatric patients. CBMH. Criminal behaviour and mental health, 20(4), 285-294
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Facets on the psychopathy checklist screening version and instrumental violence in forensic psychiatric patients
2010 (English)In: CBMH. Criminal behaviour and mental health, ISSN 0957-9664, E-ISSN 1471-2857, Vol. 20, no 4, p. 285-294Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background There is a recognised relationship between psychopathy and instrumental violence, but not all violence by people who meet the criteria for psychopathy is instrumental.Aims Our aims were to compare offence types among forensic psychiatric patients with and without the Psychopathy Checklist: Screening Version (PCL: SV) criteria for psychopathy. Our specific questions were whether factor 1 the interpersonal affective dimension was related to instrumentality and on severity of the violent crime. Our hypothesis was that the relationship between psychopathy and instrumental violence would be dependent on the severity of the violent crime.Methods Sixty-five male patients at the forensic psychiatric hospital in Sundsvall, all with a violent criminal history, were assessed for psychopathy through interview and records using the PCL: SV. Severity and the instrumentality of their previous violence were coded using the Cornell coding guide for violent incidents.Results The interpersonal features of psychopathy (the interpersonal facet), and only the interpersonal features were significantly associated with instrumentality and severity of violence. Instrumentality was also significantly related to the severity of the violence, independent of psychopathy score.Conclusions The results indicated that, at least among forensic psychiatric patients, planning is more likely than not with respect to serious crimes. The specific link between interpersonal features of psychopathy and instrumental and severe violence suggests potential clinical value in recognising subtypes of psychopathy.

Keyword
RECIDIVISM; AGGRESSION; OFFENDERS
National Category
Law and Society
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-12412 (URN)10.1002/cbm.779 (DOI)000283610400004 ()
Available from: 2010-12-05 Created: 2010-12-05 Last updated: 2017-12-12Bibliographically approved
Belfrage, H. & Strand, S. (2009). Validation of the Guide for Stalking Assessment and Management (SAM) in Swedish law enforcement.. International Journal of Police Science and Management, 11(1), 67-76
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Validation of the Guide for Stalking Assessment and Management (SAM) in Swedish law enforcement.
2009 (English)In: International Journal of Police Science and Management, ISSN 1461-3557, E-ISSN 1478-1603, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 67-76Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Keyword
kriminologi
National Category
Law and Society
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-4567 (URN)5673 (Local ID)5673 (Archive number)5673 (OAI)
Available from: 2008-09-30 Created: 2008-12-17 Last updated: 2017-12-12Bibliographically approved
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