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Jaldemark, Jimmy, DocentORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-7140-8407
Publications (10 of 70) Show all publications
Cleveland-Innes, M., Feng, X., Garner, A., Jaldemark, J. & McKenzie, G. (2019). Assessing emotional presence in Communities of Inquiry: From the instructors point of view. In: : . Paper presented at The 28th ICDE World Conference on Online Learning, Dublin, Ireland, 3-7 November, 2019. Dublin, Ireland
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Assessing emotional presence in Communities of Inquiry: From the instructors point of view
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2019 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

For Garrison, a Community of Inquiry is a group of individuals who collaboratively engage in purposeful critical discourse and reflection to construct meaning and confirm mutual understanding. In this study, we add Lehman’s argument that emotions are necessary to create a presence in an online learning environment and suggest that emotional presence supports reflection and knowledge construction. Using the Community of Inquiry theoretical framework and measurement tools as a base, this study measures to the extent to which instructors identify the existence of emotional presence among their students. This identification of emotion may allow instructors to respond according, if and when needed, to deflect or direct emotion in reference to building presence and, ultimately, a community of inquiry.In 2016 pilot testing of a revised CoI measurement tool, written from the instructor ‘s point of view, was tested in faculty development workshops. Following this pilot test, the instrument was used with a total of 287 higher education faculty from Portland, Oregon USA, in Beijing, China, and Sundsval, Sweden. Results indicate a correlation between years of teaching and acknowledgement of emotion but not a separate place for emotional presence in the community of inquiry framework. This is in contrast to studies of online learners where emotional presence emerges as a unique element in a community of inquiry. This paper presentation will review these findings in contrast to other similar studies and facilitate discussion of possible differences in perceptions of emotional presence between instructors and learners.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Dublin, Ireland: , 2019
National Category
Pedagogy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-37919 (URN)
Conference
The 28th ICDE World Conference on Online Learning, Dublin, Ireland, 3-7 November, 2019
Available from: 2019-12-06 Created: 2019-12-06 Last updated: 2020-01-29Bibliographically approved
Mozelius, P., Jaldemark, J., Eriksson Bergström, S. & Sundgren, M. (2019). Augmented Education: Location-Based Games for Real-World Teaching and Learning Sessions. In: Vladimir Geroimenko (Ed.), Augmented Reality Games I: (pp. 217-235). Springer
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Augmented Education: Location-Based Games for Real-World Teaching and Learning Sessions
2019 (English)In: Augmented Reality Games I / [ed] Vladimir Geroimenko, Springer, 2019, p. 217-235Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

GPS-equipped smartphones have enabled the construction of location-based games. In augmented reality (AR), fantasy worlds are mapped to real-world settings. Two location-based AR games that use historical markers as points of interest are Ingress and Pokémon GO. This chapter describes and discusses how PokéStop statues in Pokémon GO can be used in primary school outdoor sessions. A case study was conducted on how fifth-grade students learned about local history, social sciences and humanities during game sessions. Findings suggest that AR could be an inspiring  extension in educational settings, if activities are aligned to the surroundings and learning objectives and outdoor gaming activities are followed up in more traditional classroom sessions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2019
Series
Augmented Reality Games ; 1
Keywords
augmented reality, location-based games, Pokémon GO, outdoor learning
National Category
Didactics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-36148 (URN)10.1007/978-3-030-15616-9_14 (DOI)978-3-030-15615-2 (ISBN)
Available from: 2019-05-15 Created: 2019-05-15 Last updated: 2019-06-03Bibliographically approved
Hrastinski, S., Olofsson, A. D., Arkenback, C., Ekström, S., Ericsson, E., Fransson, G., . . . Utterberg, M. (2019). Critical Imaginaries and Reflections on Artificial Intelligence and Robots in Postdigital K-12 Education. Postdigital Science and Education, 1(2), 427-445
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Critical Imaginaries and Reflections on Artificial Intelligence and Robots in Postdigital K-12 Education
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2019 (English)In: Postdigital Science and Education, ISSN 2524-4868, Vol. 1, no 2, p. 427-445Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

It is commonly suggested that emerging technologies will revolutionize education. In this paper, two such emerging technologies, artificial intelligence (AI) and educational robots (ER), are in focus. The aim of the paper is to explore how teachers, researchers and pedagogical developers critically imagine and reflect upon how AI and robots could be used in education. The empirical data were collected from discussion groups that were part of a symposium. For both AI and ERs, the need for more knowledge about these technologies, how they operates, the need for more knowledge about these technologies, how they could preferably be used, and how the emergence of these technologies might affect the role of the teacher and the relationship between teachers and students, were outlined. Many participants saw more potential to use AI for individualization as compared with ERs. However, there were also more concerns, such as ethical issues and economic interests, when discussing AI. While the researchers/developers to a greater extent imagined ideal future technology-rich educational practices, the practitioners were more focused on imaginaries grounded in current practice.

Keywords
Artificial intelligence, Educational robots, Postdigital education, K-12 education, Automation, Symposium
National Category
Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-36243 (URN)10.1007/s42438-019-00046-x (DOI)
Projects
IT i lärande
Available from: 2019-05-27 Created: 2019-06-03 Last updated: 2019-09-09
Spante, M., Johansson, K. & Jaldemark, J. (2019). MakerSpaces in schools: Networked learning among teachers to support curriculum-driven pupil learning in programming. In: Littlejohn, Allison; Jaldemark, Jimmy; Vrieling-Teunter, Emmy and Nijland, Femke (Ed.), Networked professional learning: Emerging and equitable discourses for professional development (pp. 223-237). Springer
Open this publication in new window or tab >>MakerSpaces in schools: Networked learning among teachers to support curriculum-driven pupil learning in programming
2019 (English)In: Networked professional learning: Emerging and equitable discourses for professional development / [ed] Littlejohn, Allison; Jaldemark, Jimmy; Vrieling-Teunter, Emmy and Nijland, Femke, Springer, 2019, p. 223-237Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

In recent years, many countries have introduced programming as content in their national educational strategies. This study focused on how teachers from various K-6 schools met regularly in learning groups to discuss their experiences integrating programming in MakerSpace settings, places equipped with various materials that can be used to construct things to enhance creativity and cross-disciplinary collaboration. The project focussed on studying the activities in an established network in a Swedish municipality (i.e., how teachers experienced the value of network meetings and how they incorporated lessons learned from other participants in the teacher learning group [TLG]). The study addressed the following research question: What are the learning experiences of teachers in K-6 schools that participate in a top-down networked professional development project that focuses on integrating computer programming into the curriculum? A narrative written method was applied to collect data from seven teachers in the network. The results indicated that teachers found it useful to participate in a top-down networked professional development project. They experienced that participating in the TLG helped them develop their professional attitudes, knowledge and practices. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2019
Keywords
MakerSpace, networked professional development, networked learning, teacher learning groups, TLG
National Category
Pedagogy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-35014 (URN)10.1007/978-3-030-18030-0_13 (DOI)978-3-030-18030-0 (ISBN)
Available from: 2019-08-16 Created: 2019-08-16 Last updated: 2019-08-16Bibliographically approved
Littlejohn, A., Jaldemark, J., Vrieling-Teunter, E. & Nijland, F. (2019). Networked professional learning: An introduction. In: Littlejohn, Allison; Jaldemark, Jimmy; Vrieling-Teunter, Emmy and Nijland, Femke (Ed.), Networked professional learning: Emerging and equitable discourses for professional development (pp. 1-11). Springer
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Networked professional learning: An introduction
2019 (English)In: Networked professional learning: Emerging and equitable discourses for professional development / [ed] Littlejohn, Allison; Jaldemark, Jimmy; Vrieling-Teunter, Emmy and Nijland, Femke, Springer, 2019, p. 1-11Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Over the past decades a new form of professionalism has emerged, characterized by factors of fluidity, instability and continual change (Beck, 2000; De Laat, Schreurs, & Nijland, 2014). These factors diminish the validity of traditional career trajectories, where people would learn the professional knowledge they needed to follow a vocational pathway (Billett, 2001). New forms of professional development that support agile and flexible expansion of professional practice are needed (Tynjälä, 2008). Ideally these forms of development would be integrated into work, rather than being offered as a form of training in parallel to work (Felstead, Fuller, Jewson, & Unwin, 2009). Through the integration of work and learning, professionals could develop new forms of practice in efficient and effective ways. At the same time, the digitization of work has had a profound effect on professional practice (Huws, 2014). This digitization opens up opportunities for new forms of professional learning mediated by technologies through networked learning (Littlejohn & Margaryan, 2014). Networked learning is believed to lead to a more efficient flow of complex knowledge and routine information within the organization (Coburn, Mata, & Choi, 2013; Reagans & Mcevily, 2003), stimulate innovative behaviour (Coburn et al., 2013; Moolenaar, Daly & Sleegers, 2010; Thurlings, Evers, & Vermeulen, 2014) and result in a higher job satisfaction (Flap & Völker, 2001; Stoll, Bolam, McMahon, Wallace & Thomas, 2006). In this respect, networked learning can be perceived as an important perspective on both professional and organizational development. There is evidence that professionals learn in informal networks, yet networked learning has been largely invisible to professionals, managers and organisations as a form of professional development (Milligan, Littlejohn, & Margaryan, 2013). One reason could be because learning in networks requires specific competences that have to be acquired either through practice or in educational training, bringing new forms of professionalism. Another reason could be because learners may determine their own learning pathways, rather than relying on a teacher or trainer to guide them. These pathways may include observing colleagues who have greater expertise (Billett, 2011) or learning through working (Eraut, 2000). In these situations, learners may seem invisible. Alternatively, they may stray across traditional boundaries as they learn (Daniels, Edwards, Engeström, Gallagher, & Ludvigsen, 2013). This book, Networked Professional Learning, critiques the potential of networked learning as a platform for professional development. The concept of learning through work is, therefore well established and the use of the network as a medium for learning expands beyond the notion of ‘Professional Development’ which often is considered as formal, structured learning towards a more fluid and embedded form of learning for work which we term Networked Professional Learning. The book draws together the work of 35 experts across 6 countries spanning 3 continents, including Denmark, Sweden, the Netherlands, Australia, Israel and the UK. The book will be of interest to researchers in the area of professional and digital learning, higher education managers, organizational Human Resource professionals, policy makers and students of technology enhanced learning. A unique feature of the text is that it not only provides examples of Networked Professional Learning, but it questions the impact of this emerging form of learning on work practice and interrogates the impact on the professionals of the future. To achieve this goal, the book is structured into three sections that explore networked professional learning from varying different perspectives, questioning what are legitimate forms of networked professional learning (Part 1 on Networked Professional Learning across the Professions), how new forms of professional learning impact the Academy (Part 2 on Higher Education) and what is the value creation that Networked Learning offers education professionals (Part 3 on Teacher Education).

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2019
Series
Research in networked learning
Keywords
higher education, networked learning, professional development, professional learning, technology-enhanced learning, workplace learning
National Category
Pedagogy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-35008 (URN)10.1007/978-3-030-18030-0_1 (DOI)978-3-030-18030-0 (ISBN)
Available from: 2019-08-16 Created: 2019-08-16 Last updated: 2019-08-16Bibliographically approved
Littlejohn, A., Jaldemark, J., Vrieling-Teunter, E. & Nijland, F. (Eds.). (2019). Networked professional learning: Emerging and equitable discourses for professional development. Springer
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Networked professional learning: Emerging and equitable discourses for professional development
2019 (English)Collection (editor) (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Over the past decades a new form of professionalism has emerged, characterized by factors of fluidity, instability and continual change (Beck, 2000; De Laat, Schreurs, & Nijland, 2014). These factors diminish the validity of traditional career trajectories, where people would learn the professional knowledge they needed to follow a vocational pathway (Billett, 2001). New forms of professional development that support agile and flexible expansion of professional practice are needed (Tynjälä, 2008). Ideally these forms of development would be integrated into work, rather than being offered as a form of training in parallel to work (Felstead, Fuller, Jewson, & Unwin, 2009). Through the integration of work and learning, professionals could develop new forms of practice in efficient and effective ways. At the same time, the digitization of work has had a profound effect on professional practice (Huws, 2014). This digitization opens up opportunities for new forms of professional learning mediated by technologies through networked learning (Littlejohn & Margaryan, 2014). Networked learning is believed to lead to a more efficient flow of complex knowledge and routine information within the organization (Coburn, Mata, & Choi, 2013; Reagans & Mcevily, 2003), stimulate innovative behaviour (Coburn et al., 2013; Moolenaar, Daly & Sleegers, 2010; Thurlings, Evers, & Vermeulen, 2014) and result in a higher job satisfaction (Flap & Völker, 2001; Stoll, Bolam, McMahon, Wallace & Thomas, 2006). In this respect, networked learning can be perceived as an important perspective on both professional and organizational development. There is evidence that professionals learn in informal networks, yet networked learning has been largely invisible to professionals, managers and organisations as a form of professional development (Milligan, Littlejohn, & Margaryan, 2013). One reason could be because learning in networks requires specific competences that have to be acquired either through practice or in educational training, bringing new forms of professionalism. Another reason could be because learners may determine their own learning pathways, rather than relying on a teacher or trainer to guide them. These pathways may include observing colleagues who have greater expertise (Billett, 2011) or learning through working (Eraut, 2000). In these situations, learners may seem invisible. Alternatively, they may stray across traditional boundaries as they learn (Daniels, Edwards, Engeström, Gallagher, & Ludvigsen, 2013). This book, Networked Professional Learning, critiques the potential of networked learning as a platform for professional development. The concept of learning through work is, therefore well established and the use of the network as a medium for learning expands beyond the notion of ‘Professional Development’ which often is considered as formal, structured learning towards a more fluid and embedded form of learning for work which we term Networked Professional Learning. The book draws together the work of 35 experts across 6 countries spanning 3 continents, including Denmark, Sweden, the Netherlands, Australia, Israel and the UK. The book will be of interest to researchers in the area of professional and digital learning, higher education managers, organizational Human Resource professionals, policy makers and students of technology enhanced learning. A unique feature of the text is that it not only provides examples of Networked Professional Learning, but it questions the impact of this emerging form of learning on work practice and interrogates the impact on the professionals of the future. To achieve this goal, the book is structured into three sections that explore networked professional learning from varying different perspectives, questioning what are legitimate forms of networked professional learning (Part 1 on Networked Professional Learning across the Professions), how new forms of professional learning impact the Academy (Part 2 on Higher Education) and what is the value creation that Networked Learning offers education professionals (Part 3 on Teacher Education).

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2019
Series
Research in networked learning
Keywords
higher education, networked learning, professional development, professional learning, teacher education, technology-enhanced learning, workplace learning
National Category
Pedagogy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-35009 (URN)10.1007/978-3-030-18030-0 (DOI)978-3-030-18029-4 (ISBN)978-3-030-18030-0 (ISBN)
Available from: 2019-08-16 Created: 2019-08-16 Last updated: 2019-08-16Bibliographically approved
Jaldemark, J., Eriksson Bergström, S. & Mozelius, P. (2019). Orchestrating learning as an emergent practice in the use of location-based games with mobile devices. In: Teresa Cerratto Pargman and Isa Jahnke (Ed.), Emergent practices and material conditions in learning and teaching with technologies: (pp. 163-180). Cham, Switzerland: Springer
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Orchestrating learning as an emergent practice in the use of location-based games with mobile devices
2019 (English)In: Emergent practices and material conditions in learning and teaching with technologies / [ed] Teresa Cerratto Pargman and Isa Jahnke, Cham, Switzerland: Springer, 2019, p. 163-180Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This study discusses the inclusion of location-based games and mobile devices in an educational setting that embraces both indoor and outdoor sessions. The study was built on a framework including learning as a social and collaborative phenomenon. Two case units, in terms of a 5th grade Social Science class and a 6th grade Mathematics class, were included in the study. Each case unit embraced an indoor preparing session, an outdoor session including mobile devices and the location-based game Pokémon GO, and an indoor follow-up session. The chapter aims at contributing to the understanding of how students and teachers together, in an emergent practice of orchestrating learning, apply mobile devices and location-based games in their educational setting. From this aim, the following research question unfolds: How could location-based games and mobile devices be applied by students and teachers to orchestrate learning in middle school settings? Data were gathered by semi-structured group interviews and video recordings with 20 students and two teachers. Moreover, documents such as lesson plans were included in the dataset. In the study, it was found that students and teachers participated in a shared and emerging practice of orchestrating learning and teaching. In this practice students and teachers acted as co-designers to orchestrate the application of location-based games and mobile devices in the educational setting. Findings suggest that an orchestration including a combination of a collaborative approach to learning, location-based games and activities that embrace outdoor and indoor sessions has the potential to vitalise and enhance traditional classroom-based education. However, there is not a guarantee that all students will concentrate on the given task, and just as in an ordinary classroom setting, teaching and learning also require careful orchestration. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cham, Switzerland: Springer, 2019
Keywords
Childhood, Game-based learning, Learning, Location-based games, Middle school, Mobile devices, Mobile learning, Orchestration, Outdoor education, Smartphones
National Category
Pedagogy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-35019 (URN)10.1007/978-3-030-10764-2_10 (DOI)978-3-030-10763-5 (ISBN)978-3-030-10764-2 (ISBN)
Available from: 2019-03-26 Created: 2019-03-26 Last updated: 2019-04-04Bibliographically approved
Jaldemark, J., Håkansson Lindqvist, M. & Mozelius, P. (2019). Teachers’ beliefs about professional development: Supporting emerging networked practices in higher education. In: Littlejohn, Allison; Jaldemark, Jimmy; Vrieling-Teunter, Emmy and Nijland, Femke (Ed.), Networked professional learning: Emerging and equitable discourses for professional development (pp. 147-164). Springer
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Teachers’ beliefs about professional development: Supporting emerging networked practices in higher education
2019 (English)In: Networked professional learning: Emerging and equitable discourses for professional development / [ed] Littlejohn, Allison; Jaldemark, Jimmy; Vrieling-Teunter, Emmy and Nijland, Femke, Springer, 2019, p. 147-164Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

During recent decades society has gone through changes related to social and technological development. These changes have impacted higher education. This has led to emerging networked practices that professionals and the organisations they work within need to respond to. An answer to this challenge to higher education is efforts in professional development. This chapter discusses teachers’ beliefs about such professional development. Particularly, it focuses on how networked practices in higher education are supported and fostered by professional development projects. The study was based at a Swedish university and included the dissemination of beliefs of teachers from three different departments that participated in two development projects. The data materials were collected by using semi-structured interviews from a sample of 19 teachers. The results revealed that professional development concerns beliefs on both individual and collective levels. Within these levels teachers related their professional development to both social and technological networks.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2019
Keywords
development projects, higher education, networked learning, professional development, teachers’ beliefs
National Category
Pedagogy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-35013 (URN)10.1007/978-3-030-18030-0_9 (DOI)978-3-030-18030-0 (ISBN)
Available from: 2019-08-16 Created: 2019-08-16 Last updated: 2019-08-16Bibliographically approved
Jaldemark, J., Eriksson Bergström, S., von Zeipel, H. & Westman, A.-K. (2019). Wearable technologies as a research tool for studying learning: The application of spy glasses in data collection of children's learning (2ed.). In: Yu Aimee Zhang, Dean Cristol (Ed.), Handbook of mobile teaching and learning: . Springer
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Wearable technologies as a research tool for studying learning: The application of spy glasses in data collection of children's learning
2019 (English)In: Handbook of mobile teaching and learning / [ed] Yu Aimee Zhang, Dean Cristol, Springer, 2019, 2Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This chapter discusses the potential that wearable technologies have for studying and understanding how people learn. In particular, the focus is on how spy glasses can be used as a tool for collecting data from educational situations. The chapter report from two different cases performed by the authors in which spy glasses were used, including considerations made from a methodological point of view. From the first case a conclusion is that spy-glass recording made it possible to closely follow teaching and learning during science labwork and find specific elements not found in video data from ordinary video cameras. The second case reports on valuable information about how the motivation for learning works in young children. Drawing further from these studies, the study elaborate on themes that arise as central to video research: ethics, technology and methodology as well as selection and analysis. The chapter discusses a transformation in how childhood is considered in relation to new technology. Here children are seen as more active and participatory in the shaping of their own childhoods. This can also result in developing new research methods in order to understand and visualise the child’s perspective, and using wearable technologies could certainly be one of these areas. In other words, it is a unique perspective when participants are co-creators of research studies. This implies important future work ahead, developing and applying wearable technologies for education and educational research.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2019 Edition: 2
Keywords
excursion, labwork, mobile learning, participant’s perspective, point-of-view video glasses, spy glasses, wearable devices, wearable technologies
National Category
Pedagogy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-35015 (URN)9789811327650 (ISBN)
Available from: 2019-03-26 Created: 2019-03-26 Last updated: 2019-06-19Bibliographically approved
Jaldemark, J., Hrastinski, S., Olofsson, A. D. & Öberg, L.-M. (2018). Collaborative learning enhanced by mobile technologies: New perspectives and opportunities. London
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Collaborative learning enhanced by mobile technologies: New perspectives and opportunities
2018 (English)Other (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, pages
London: , 2018
Series
THE BERA BLOG: RESEARCH MATTERS ; Tuesday 20 February 2018
Keywords
Collaborative learning, mobile devices, mobile learning
National Category
Pedagogy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-35324 (URN)
Available from: 2018-12-21 Created: 2018-12-21 Last updated: 2020-01-16Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-7140-8407