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Jaldemark, Jimmy, DocentORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-7140-8407
Publications (10 of 60) Show all publications
Jaldemark, J. (2018). Contexts of learning and challenges of mobility: Designing for a blur between formal and informal learning. In: S. Yu, M. Ally, & A. Tsinakos (Ed.), Mobile and Ubiquitous Learning: An International Handbook (pp. 141-156). Singapore: Springer
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Contexts of learning and challenges of mobility: Designing for a blur between formal and informal learning
2018 (English)In: Mobile and Ubiquitous Learning: An International Handbook / [ed] S. Yu, M. Ally, & A. Tsinakos, Singapore: Springer, 2018, p. 141-156Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The chapter aims at discussing challenges for design based on a context-dependent and complex understanding of mobile learning. The chapter elaborates on contextual aspects of learning and how these are related to mobility in terms of various issues involving physical space (locations), conceptual space (content), social space (social groups), technology, and learning dispersed over time. From these aspects, mobile learning is emphasised as a complex social process, including learning mediated by personal, wireless, and mobile devices through communication between human beings that participate in multiple contexts. Four challenges are discussed based on this complex understanding of mobile learning. Three of these challenges include the relationship between learning and educational settings. The first challenge relates to learning as a phenomenon occurring in the intersection of various physical locations and social groups. The second concerns the impact that personal, mobile, and wireless Internet-connected technology has on the monopoly of knowledge. The third concerns the boundaries between formal and informal learning. To reach a coherent conceptualisation useful in designing for mobile learning the chapter links these challenges to pragmatist and sociocultural ideas about the relation between human beings and the surrounding context. These three challenges are embraced by a fourth challenge: the conceptualisation of mobile learning and how it relates to concepts and principles for design. To meet these challenges designing for mobile learning benefit from the deployment of concepts built from a transactional worldview. Such worldview suggests the use of intersectional concepts that embrace several conceptual aspects of mobility in designing for learning.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Singapore: Springer, 2018
Series
Perspectives on Rethinking and Reforming Education, ISSN 2366-1658, E-ISSN 2366-1666
Keywords
Challenges, conceptualisation, content, context, design, educational settings, formal learning, informal learning, interaction, intersection, learning, lifelong learning, location, mobile learning, ontology, transaction, pragmatism, seamless, situated, sociocultural, space, technology, time, ubiquitous, worldview
National Category
Pedagogy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-29893 (URN)10.1007/978-981-10-6144-8 (DOI)978-981-10-6143-1 (ISBN)
Available from: 2017-01-19 Created: 2017-01-19 Last updated: 2017-12-21Bibliographically approved
Jaldemark, J., Hrastinski, S., Olofsson, A. D. & Öberg, L.-M. (2018). Editorial introduction: Collaborative learning enhanced by mobile technologies. British Journal of Educational Technology, 49(2), 201-206
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Editorial introduction: Collaborative learning enhanced by mobile technologies
2018 (English)In: British Journal of Educational Technology, ISSN 0007-1013, E-ISSN 1467-8535, Vol. 49, no 2, p. 201-206Article in journal, Editorial material (Refereed) Published
National Category
Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-32917 (URN)10.1111/bjet.12596 (DOI)000424333000001 ()2-s2.0-85034225816 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-02-22 Created: 2018-02-22 Last updated: 2018-07-05Bibliographically approved
Jaldemark, J., Hrastinski, S., Olofsson, A. D. & Öberg, L.-M. (Eds.). (2018). Editorial introduction: Collaborative learning enhanced by mobile technologies. John Wiley & Sons, 49(2)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Editorial introduction: Collaborative learning enhanced by mobile technologies
2018 (English)Collection (editor) (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2018. p. 150
National Category
Social Sciences Educational Sciences Pedagogy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-32512 (URN)10.1111/bjet.12596 (DOI)
Note

Special Issue published in British Journal of Educational Technology

Available from: 2018-12-03 Created: 2018-12-03 Last updated: 2018-12-17
Mozelius, P., Eriksson Bergström, S. & Jaldemark, J. (2018). Location-based games as a key to unlock the classroom. In: Proceedings of the the 12th European Conference on Games Based Learning, ECGBL 2018: . Paper presented at 12th European Conference on Games Based Learning, ECGBL 2018. Sophia Antipolis, France, 12
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Location-based games as a key to unlock the classroom
2018 (English)In: Proceedings of the the 12th European Conference on Games Based Learning, ECGBL 2018, Sophia Antipolis, France, 2018, Vol. 12Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Around a century ago John Dewey (2015) questioned the idea of schooling with a mandatory focus on classroom based studies only. Today, after a century of rapid technological development and vivid didactic discussions the classroom focus still remains. New portable, interconnected and omnipresent 21st century technology opens up possibilities for a spatial independent ubiquitous learning in the spirit of Dewey (Cope & Kalantzis, 2010). This study had the aim to explore and discuss the potential of using location-based games as a catalyst for outdoor activities in formal education. In what ways might a location-based and augmented reality unlock the constraint of traditional classrooms?

 

The overall research strategy has been the case study approach where data has been gathered by spy glasses, hand-held video cameras and group interviews. Two outdoor teaching and learning activities were the two main case units. In the walking sessions K12 students played Pokémon Go to learn about local history and mathematics. Around 1 TB of video clips have been thematically analysed with the use of the computer-assisted qualitative data analysis software tool NVivo. Patterns and themes found in the video analysis have been compared to themes in the answers from the group interviews.

 

Analysis themes related to location-based gaming were Discussions, Outdoor activities and Gaming and gender. Findings indicate that the use of a location-based game can be motivating and a way to unchain students’ sit-down 'enchairment'. However, game-based outdoor activities seem to have more reliable learning outcomes if they are combined with follow-up activities in the classroom. Physically active students also tend to have more active discussions than sitting students in a classroom. Finally, boys and girls seem to have different collaboration patterns during the gaming sessions.                                                                                                                        

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sophia Antipolis, France: , 2018
Keywords
Location-based games, Outdoor activities, Game-based learning, Mobile learning, Enchairment
National Category
Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-34644 (URN)978-1-911218-99-9 (ISBN)
Conference
12th European Conference on Games Based Learning, ECGBL 2018
Available from: 2018-10-06 Created: 2018-10-06 Last updated: 2018-12-12Bibliographically approved
Fransson, G., Hrastinski, S., Jaldemark, J., Lindberg, J. O., Lundin, J., Olofsson, A. D., . . . Öberg, L.-M. (2018). On the Swedish national graduate school for digital technologies in education - GRADE: Expectations and experiences of doctoral students and supervisors. In: ICERI2018 Proceedings: . Paper presented at 11th annual International Conference of Education, Research and Innovation (pp. 769-774). The International Academy of Technology, Education and Development
Open this publication in new window or tab >>On the Swedish national graduate school for digital technologies in education - GRADE: Expectations and experiences of doctoral students and supervisors
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2018 (English)In: ICERI2018 Proceedings, The International Academy of Technology, Education and Development, 2018, p. 769-774Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The Swedish National Graduate School for Digital Technologies in Education (GRADE) is a cooperative venture between six Swedish universities established during 2018. Within the field of educational sciences and in the area of digital technologies in education, GRADE aims to strengthen the expertise in the area and to increase national and international cooperation in research training activities.Over a number of years, and from multitude of sources (cf. Brown & Davis, 2004; Fisher, Higgins & Loveless, 2006; Kafai & Resnick 1996), research has stressed that increased digitalization in schools leads to a complexity that needs to be taken into account on different levels, from different perspectives and with different designs, methodologies and theoretical perspectives (cf. Olofsson, Lindberg, Fransson & Hauge, 2015; Price, Jewitt & Brown, 2013; Tondeur, Valcke & van Braak, 2008). At a micro-level, the learning situation of students, teachers and school-leaders changes and it becomes important to deepen the knowledge about the impact digital technologies has on the fundamental conditions for teaching and learning of different school subjects (cf. Chun, Kern & Smith 2016; Leung & Baccaglini-Frank, 2017). On a macro-level, conditions for education as such changes and digital technologies becomes an important object of study as agents of change (Wong & Li, 2008). The digitalization of K-12 schools has long been highlighted in policy as a necessity (cf. Kirkman et al, 2002; OECD, 2010). However, research and evaluations (cf. Fransson et al, 2012; OECD, 2015; Wastiau et al, 2013) show that many substantial challenges remain. One of the fundamental pillars of GRADE is the interdisciplinary approach. Several disciplines are present (Applied IT, Curriculum studies, Education, Informatics, Technology and Learning, Educational work, Work-interated Learning) in researching digital technologies in K-12 schools with the ambition to contribute to the continued implementation, integration and use of digital technologies in Swedish K-12 schools that stems from the evidence-based knowledge produced within the activities of GRADE. The research within GRADE will be characterized by close cooperation with stakeholders from school practice, with the aim to contribute to concrete school development. In GRADE, a multi-level approach that involves multiple layers or levels of school activities will be encouraged. When possible, studies will be longitudinal. This will imply studies from an organizational and management perspective, e.g. studies of school leaders and other members of senior management positions responsible for digital technology use and implementation. Also implied are studies of teachers' teaching practices and didactical considerations, as well as studies of the students in classrooms and their learning using digital technologies. This will also imply that several issues with a bearing on the digitalization of education, for example regarding school policy, teaching, learning, assessment and professional development will be researched from different perspectives and with different methodological approaches. In this paper, these points of departure will be explored based on the expectations and experiences of the first twelve admitted doctoral students and their supervisors.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
The International Academy of Technology, Education and Development, 2018
Keywords
digital technologies, k-12, research school
National Category
Pedagogy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-35007 (URN)10.21125/iceri.2018.1164 (DOI)978-84-09-05948-5 (ISBN)
Conference
11th annual International Conference of Education, Research and Innovation
Available from: 2018-12-03 Created: 2018-12-03 Last updated: 2018-12-06Bibliographically approved
Håkansson Lindqvist, M., Jaldemark, J. & Mozelius, P. (2018). Professional development as a collaborative endeavour of networked learning in higher educational settings: Dissemination of knowledge among teacher training professionals. In: Bajić, M, Dohn, NB, de Laat, M, Jandrić, P & Ryberg, T (Ed.), Proceedings of the Eleventh International Conference on Networked Learning 2018: . Paper presented at Networked Learning Conference 2018, Zagreb, Croatia, 14-16 May 2018.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Professional development as a collaborative endeavour of networked learning in higher educational settings: Dissemination of knowledge among teacher training professionals
2018 (English)In: Proceedings of the Eleventh International Conference on Networked Learning 2018 / [ed] Bajić, M, Dohn, NB, de Laat, M, Jandrić, P & Ryberg, T, 2018Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

University teachers continue to strive to take up mobile and blended learning technologies in their teaching practices and universities continue to support this work through professional development courses for university teachers. At Mid Sweden University, two projects have recently been carried out with the objective to develop higher education practices supported by mobile and blended learning technologies in teaching in practice. Professional development for university teachers was expected take place using an iterative design comprising five features: participating in a competence development course, planning trials, conducting trials, evaluating teaching and participating in a pedagogical seminar. In this paper, the preliminary results of the final interviews with 12 teacher educators will be presented. The interviews were carried out to explore beliefs regarding changes in teaching practices, following the completion of teacher professional development project. The results showed that the teacher educators in this study experienced change in the use of mobile and blended learning in their teaching through dialogue, collaboration, dissemination and networked learning. Three themes were identified. The first theme was collaboration. Here, the teacher educators expressed beliefs which could be related to collaboration for learning to use mobile and blended learning technologies in their teaching, supporting conditions for networked learning. This involved working and planning new technologies in new courses together. In the second theme, sharing is caring, the teachers in the study expressed helping each other out and supporting each other in the work to learn and use new technologies in their teaching. Support through pep talks and taking on learning new technologies as a group was one example of gaining knowledge about new technologies. In the third and final theme, the teacher educators’ expressed beliefs regarding dissemination as a way to share knowledge and experiences. Beliefs expressed here included learning through seeing what others were working with and exchanging knowledge. The teacher educators’ in this study also expressed the need for continued learning through collaboration and dissemination, as networked learning in their community of practice. How universities continue to provide professional development to support teachers’ continued work together in communities of practice through networked learning will be of importance. These efforts in professional development will provide possibilities to push forward change in teachers’ use of mobile and blended learning in their teaching practices.

Series
Proceedings of the International Conference on Networked Learning ; 11
Keywords
teacher professional development, blended learning, collaborative learning, community of practice, higher education, mobile learning
National Category
Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-33660 (URN)978-1-86220-337-2 (ISBN)
Conference
Networked Learning Conference 2018, Zagreb, Croatia, 14-16 May 2018
Available from: 2018-05-23 Created: 2018-05-23 Last updated: 2018-08-06Bibliographically approved
Mozelius, P., Jaldemark, J. & Håkansson Lindqvist, M. (2018). Teachers’ beliefs about professional development and the use of collaborative online tools in higher educational settings. In: Bajić, M, Dohn, NB, de Laat, M, Jandrić, P & Ryberg, T (Ed.), Proceedings of the 11th International Conference on Networked Learning 2018: . Paper presented at Networked Learning Conference 2018, Zagreb, Croatia, 14-16 May, 2018 (pp. 361-364). , 11
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Teachers’ beliefs about professional development and the use of collaborative online tools in higher educational settings
2018 (English)In: Proceedings of the 11th International Conference on Networked Learning 2018 / [ed] Bajić, M, Dohn, NB, de Laat, M, Jandrić, P & Ryberg, T, 2018, Vol. 11, p. 361-364Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Teaching in higher education beyond the boundaries of face-to-face education is an evolving practiceincluding the integration of various technologies to support collaboration between learners andteachers. From a historical perspective the integration of such technologies in this practice hasafforded different time- and location-related conditions for collaboration. This development hasbrought new conditions for the practice of teaching in higher education. From being a practice mainlylocated at the university, teaching is possible to occur elsewhere; e.g., on the move, or from the homesetting. It has paved the way to introduce so called blended learning practices of teaching in highereducation. Such practice has been an emerging trend in the 21st century with an overall impact on thedesign of university courses. Applications, devices and networks that initially were used inexperimental distance education have later become natural parts of mainstream education, withblended learning as a standard concept in higher education. The rich plethora of information andcommunication technologies applied as tools to mediate learning and support teaching have created aneed for teachers’ professional development. The aim of this study is to present and discuss universityteachers’ perceptions and beliefs about how the supplementary training should be organised. Datawere gathered by semi-structured interviews at a department for Computer and System Science whereall seven interviewees teach in blended synchronous educational settings. The empirical material wereanalysed inductively by applying a thematic analysis method. Findings show that all courses have abasic common toolbox as well as an extended specific toolbox that both are continuously changing.This can be stressful and the formal teacher professional development is far from satisfying. Teacherscope with problems by consulting the collegium, a peer group where colleagues share experiences andassist each other in problem solving. Despite the constant pressure many teachers have creative ideasfor a further development of the blended synchronous learning concept. Many of the teachers in thisstudy see the continual attempts to implement these tools and experimenting with these tools in theirteaching as possibilities in their teaching as well as a source of professional development.

Series
International Conference on Networked Learning ; 11
Keywords
blended synchronous learning, collegial learning, online collaboration, teachers’ beliefs, teacher professional development
National Category
Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-33658 (URN)978-1-86220-337-2 (ISBN)
Conference
Networked Learning Conference 2018, Zagreb, Croatia, 14-16 May, 2018
Available from: 2018-05-22 Created: 2018-05-22 Last updated: 2018-08-06Bibliographically approved
Jaldemark, J., Eriksson Bergström, S. & Mozelius, P. (2017). Applying mobile devices and game-based learning in formal educational settings: Playing Pokémon Go as a tool for learning in a Swedish elementary school. In: Ola Lindberg, Anders D: Olofsson (Ed.), Recent Trends in the Digitalization of the Nordic K-12 Schools: . Paper presented at Recent Trends in the Digitalization of the Nordic K-12 Schools, Umeå, 11-13 October 2017 (pp. 1-4). Umeå
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Applying mobile devices and game-based learning in formal educational settings: Playing Pokémon Go as a tool for learning in a Swedish elementary school
2017 (English)In: Recent Trends in the Digitalization of the Nordic K-12 Schools / [ed] Ola Lindberg, Anders D: Olofsson, Umeå, 2017, p. 1-4Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Umeå: , 2017
Keywords
childhood studies, elementary school, gamebased learning, locationbased games, mobile learning, Pokemon GO, technology-enhanced learning
National Category
Pedagogy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-32682 (URN)
Conference
Recent Trends in the Digitalization of the Nordic K-12 Schools, Umeå, 11-13 October 2017
Available from: 2018-01-15 Created: 2018-01-15 Last updated: 2018-01-16Bibliographically approved
Sundgren, M., Håkansson Lindqvist, M., Jaldemark, J., Mozelius, P. & Öberg, L.-M. (2017). Design of Active Learning Spaces for Blended Learning Groups - the Teacher Perspective. In: Langley, D., Baepler, P., & Wright, R. (Ed.), International Forum on Active Learning Classrooms, Minnesota, MN, August 9-11 2017: . Paper presented at International Forum on Active Learning Classrooms, Minnesota, MN, August 9-11 2017. University of Minnesota Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Design of Active Learning Spaces for Blended Learning Groups - the Teacher Perspective
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2017 (English)In: International Forum on Active Learning Classrooms, Minnesota, MN, August 9-11 2017 / [ed] Langley, D., Baepler, P., & Wright, R., University of Minnesota Press, 2017Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The use of blended learning environments in higher education has rapidly increased in the 21st century, but if the term also should include blended student groups there is a need for redesign of existing learning spaces. Today many universities give courses and programmes for a mix of campus students and distance participants. There are several research studies reporting on the benefits of blended learning environments for universities and students, while there are less reports on the teacher view of blended learning design.

This study has the aim to describe, evaluate and discuss the design of selected active learning spaces from a teacher perspective. The main research question to answer is: “How should the new learning spaces be designed to support a student centred instructional design for blended student groups?”.   The overall research strategy was a case study gathering data in a mix of observations, semi-structured interviews and document studies.

Findings indicate that the new design of classrooms and lecture halls is a step in the right direction opening up new possibilities for active learning. However, there still exist needs for further refinement and teacher training.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
University of Minnesota Press, 2017
Keywords
Active Learning Spaces, Blended learning, Technology enhanced learning, Higher education
National Category
Pedagogy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-31549 (URN)
Conference
International Forum on Active Learning Classrooms, Minnesota, MN, August 9-11 2017
Projects
HEEL
Available from: 2017-09-07 Created: 2017-09-07 Last updated: 2017-10-09Bibliographically approved
Mozelius, P., Eriksson Bergström, S. & Jaldemark, J. (2017). Learning by Walking - Pokémon Go and Mobile Technology in Formal Education. In: L. Gómez Chova, A. López Martínez and I. Candel Torres (Ed.), ICERI2017 Proceedings: . Paper presented at 10th International Conference of Education, Research and Innovation, Seville, Spain, NOV 16-18, 2017 (pp. 1172-1179). Valencia, Spain: The International Academy of Technology, Education and Development, 10
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Learning by Walking - Pokémon Go and Mobile Technology in Formal Education
2017 (English)In: ICERI2017 Proceedings / [ed] L. Gómez Chova, A. López Martínez and I. Candel Torres, Valencia, Spain: The International Academy of Technology, Education and Development, 2017, Vol. 10, p. 1172-1179Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Peripatetic group learning has a long history that dates back to the walking sessions that Plato and Aristotle led in the Lyceum of Athens. Other teachers in ancient Greece also frequently used play and physical training didactically. Pokémon Go has a relatively short history (starting in the summer of 2016), but this location-based game had a faster global spread than anyone could have imagined. In the first week after its release, the game became the most downloaded app in history. In Pokémon Go, the players use real-world maps on which buildings, roads and water are correctly indicated. The game is played on mobile devices; the Pokémon figures pop up on maps and can be captured with virtual balls. To catch the Pokémon figures, players must physically move to the place where the figure is located; thus, unlike most other digital games, Pokémon Go involves outdoor activities such as long walks.

With its high degree of physical activity, Pokémon Go has attracted researchers’ attention for use as an exergame. Several researchers are also looking at Pokémon Go’s use as an augmented-reality game. In this study, the focus is on Pokémon Go’s use as a mobile-learning game and on the potential for outdoor activities in formal education. In this study, two primary school classes used the game for learning sessions in mathematics and social science. The aim of this study is to discuss students’ expressions regarding how a location-based game such as Pokémon Go could be used as a tool for outdoor activities in formal education.

Each primary school class was divided into groups of three to four students each for planned lessons that included walks. Each group had one or two smartphones to stimulate collaboration between students. The walks included PokéStops where teachers conducted planned sessions; later, the teachers followed up on the outdoor lessons within a traditional classroom setting. Data were gathered from group interviews with the students who participated in the outdoor sessions involving Pokémon Go. The collected data were then analysed and categorised via a thematic analysis.

The findings show that Pokémon Go can be seen as a learning-stimulating game that could augment traditional teaching sessions in formal education. Students reported that they enjoyed catching the Pokémon figures the most, but some students also mentioned that they appreciated the math assignments and liked learning about the statues that they passed during the walkings. The most positive findings were that there were concrete learning outcomes and that this mobile, game-based educational setting seemed to encourage students to engage in collaborative learning. However, Pokémon Go is not an all-encompassing solution for the ongoing digitalisation of primary school. The conclusion is rather that location-based games have the potential to vitalise formal education, provided that they are carefully integrated into the curriculum.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Valencia, Spain: The International Academy of Technology, Education and Development, 2017
Series
ICERI Proceedings, ISSN 2340-1095 ; 10
Keywords
Game-based learning, location-based games, mobile learning, outdoor learning, peripatetic group learning, Pokémon Go
National Category
Didactics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-32104 (URN)10.21125/iceri.2017.0394 (DOI)000429975301044 ()978-84-697-6957-7 (ISBN)
Conference
10th International Conference of Education, Research and Innovation, Seville, Spain, NOV 16-18, 2017
Available from: 2017-11-20 Created: 2017-11-20 Last updated: 2018-05-30Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-7140-8407

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