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Tesch, Per A.
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Publications (10 of 147) Show all publications
Fernandez-Gonzalo, R., Nissemark, C., Aslund, B., Tesch, P. A. & Sojka, P. (2014). Chronic stroke patients show early and robust improvements in muscle and functional performance in response to eccentric-overload flywheel resistance training: a pilot study. Journal of NeuroEngineering and Rehabilitation, 11, Art. no. 150
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Chronic stroke patients show early and robust improvements in muscle and functional performance in response to eccentric-overload flywheel resistance training: a pilot study
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2014 (English)In: Journal of NeuroEngineering and Rehabilitation, ISSN 1743-0003, E-ISSN 1743-0003, Vol. 11, p. Art. no. 150-Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Resistance exercise comprising eccentric (ECC) muscle actions enhances muscle strength and function to aid stroke patients in conducting daily tasks. The purpose of this study was to assess the efficacy of a novel ECC-overload flywheel resistance exercise paradigm to induce muscle and functional performance adaptations in chronic stroke patients. Methods: Twelve patients (similar to 8 years after stroke onset) performed 4 sets of 7 coupled concentric (CON) and ECC actions using the affected limb on a flywheel leg press (LP) device twice weekly for 8 weeks. Maximal CON and ECC isokinetic torque at 30, 60 and 90 degrees/s, isometric knee extension and LP force, and CON and ECC peak power in LP were measured before and after training. Balance (Berg Balance Scale, BBS), gait (6-Min Walk test, 6MWT; Timed-Up-and-Go, TUG), functional performance (30-s Chair-Stand Test, 30CST), spasticity (Modified Ashworth Scale) and perceived participation (Stroke Impact Scale, SIS) were also determined. Results: CON and ECC peak power increased in both the trained affected (34 and 44%; P < 0.01), and the untrained, non-affected leg (25 and 34%; P < 0.02). Power gains were greater (P = 0.008) for ECC than CON actions. ECC isokinetic torque at 60 and 90 degrees/s increased in the affected leg (P < 0.04). The increase in isometric LP force for the trained, affected leg across tests ranged 10-20% (P < 0.05). BBS (P = 0.004), TUG (P = 0.018), 30CST (P = 0.024) and SIS (P = 0.058) scores improved after training. 6MWT and spasticity remained unchanged. Conclusions: This novel, short-term ECC-overload flywheel RE training regime emerges as a valid, safe and viable method to improve muscle function, balance, gait and functional performance in men and women suffering from chronic stroke.

Keywords
Balance, Bilateral asymmetry, Muscle strength, Neuro-rehabilitation
National Category
Health Sciences Physiotherapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-24269 (URN)10.1186/1743-0003-11-150 (DOI)000346939600001 ()2-s2.0-84920778251 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2015-02-03 Created: 2015-02-03 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
Fluck, M., Li, R., Valdivieso, P., Linnehan, R. M., Castells, J., Tesch, P. & Gustafsson, T. (2014). Early Changes in Costameric and Mitochondrial Protein Expression with Unloading Are Muscle Specific. BioMed Research International, Article ID 519310.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Early Changes in Costameric and Mitochondrial Protein Expression with Unloading Are Muscle Specific
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2014 (English)In: BioMed Research International, ISSN 2314-6133, E-ISSN 2314-6141, article id 519310Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We hypothesised that load-sensitive expression of costameric proteins, which hold the sarcomere in place and position the mitochondria, contributes to the early adaptations of antigravity muscle to unloading and would depend on muscle fibre composition and chymotrypsin activity of the proteasome. Biopsies were obtained from vastus lateralis (VL) and soleus (SOL) muscles of eight men before and after 3 days of unilateral lower limb suspension (ULLS) and subjected to fibre typing and measures for costameric (FAK and FRNK), mitochondrial (NDUFA9, SDHA, UQCRC1, UCP3, and ATP5A1), and MHCI protein and RNA content. Mean cross-sectional area (MCSA) of types I and II muscle fibres in VL and type I fibres in SOL demonstrated a trend for a reduction after ULLS (0.05 <= P < 0.10). FAK phosphorylation at tyrosine 397 showed a 20% reduction in VL muscle (P = 0.029). SOL muscle demonstrated a specific reduction in UCP3 content (-23%; P = 0.012). Muscle-specific effects of ULLS were identified for linear relationships between measured proteins, chymotrypsin activity and fibre MCSA. The molecular modifications in costamere turnover and energy homoeostasis identify that aspects of atrophy and fibre transformation are detectable at the protein level in weight-bearing muscles within 3 days of unloading.

National Category
Physiology Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-24270 (URN)10.1155/2014/519310 (DOI)000346284900001 ()2-s2.0-84924208549 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2015-02-03 Created: 2015-02-03 Last updated: 2018-01-11Bibliographically approved
Fernandez-Gonzalo, R., Lundberg, T. R. & Tesch, P. A. (2013). Acute molecular responses in untrained and trained muscle subjected to aerobic and resistance exercise training versus resistance training alone. Acta Physiologica, 209(4), 283-294
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Acute molecular responses in untrained and trained muscle subjected to aerobic and resistance exercise training versus resistance training alone
2013 (English)In: Acta Physiologica, ISSN 1748-1708, E-ISSN 1748-1716, Vol. 209, no 4, p. 283-294Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

AimThis study assessed and compared acute muscle molecular responses before and after 5-week training, employing either aerobic (AE) and resistance exercise (RE) or RE only. MethodsTen men performed one-legged RE, while the contralateral limb performed AE followed by RE 6h later (AE+RE). Before (untrained) and after (trained) the intervention, acute bouts of RE were performed with or without preceding AE. Biopsies were obtained from m. vastus lateralis of each leg pre- and 3h post-RE to determine mRNA levels of VEGF, PGC-1, MuRF-1, atrogin-1, myostatin and phosphorylation of mTOR, p70S6K, rpS6 and eEF2. ResultsPGC-1 and VEGF expression increased (P<0.05) after acute RE in the untrained, but not the trained state. These markers showed greater response after AE+RE than RE in either condition. Myostatin was lower after AE+RE than RE, both before and after training. AE+RE showed higher MuRF-1 and atrogin-1 expression than RE in the untrained, not the trained state. Exercise increased (P<0.05) p70S6K phosphorylation both before and after training, yet this increase tended to be more prominent for AE+RE than RE before training. Phosphorylation of p70S6K was greater in trained muscle. Changes in these markers did not correlate with exercise-induced alterations in strength or muscle size. ConclusionConcurrent exercise in untrained skeletal muscle prompts global molecular responses consistent with resulting whole muscle adaptations. Yet, training blunts the more robust anabolic response shown after AE+RE compared with RE. This study challenges the concept that single molecular markers could predict training-induced changes in muscle size or strength.

Keywords
concurrent exercise, gene expression, human skeletal muscle, mammalian target of rapamycin, p70S6 kinase
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-20644 (URN)10.1111/apha.12174 (DOI)000326924300007 ()2-s2.0-84887535632 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2013-12-11 Created: 2013-12-11 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
Lundberg, T., Fernandez-Gonzalo, R., Gustafsson, T. & Tesch, P. (2013). Aerobic exercise does not compromise muscle hypertrophy response to short-term resistance training. Journal of applied physiology, 114(1), 81-89
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Aerobic exercise does not compromise muscle hypertrophy response to short-term resistance training
2013 (English)In: Journal of applied physiology, ISSN 8750-7587, E-ISSN 1522-1601, Vol. 114, no 1, p. 81-89Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study tested the hypothesis that chronic aerobic and resistance exercise (AE+RE) would elicit greater muscle hypertrophy than resistance exercise only (RE). Ten men (25±4 yrs) performed 5 wks unilateral knee extensor AE+RE. The opposing limb was subjected to RE. AE completed 6 hrs prior to RE, consisted of ~45 min one-legged cycle ergometry. RE comprised 4 x 7 maximal concentric-eccentric knee extensions. Various indices of in vivo knee extensor function were measured before and after training. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) assessed m. quadricep femoris (QF) cross-sectional area (CSA), volume, and signal intensity (SI). Biopsies obtained from m. vastus lateralis determined fiber CSA, enzyme levels and gene expression of myostatin, atrogin-1, MuRF-1, PGC-1α and VEGF. Increases (P < 0.05) in isometric strength and peak power, respectively were comparable in AE+RE (9 and 29%) and RE (11 and 24%). AE+RE showed greater increase (14%; P < 0.05) in QF volume than RE (8%). Muscle fiber CSA increased 17% after AE+RE (P < 0.05) and 9% after RE (P > 0.05). QF SI increased (12%; P < 0.05) after AE+RE, but not RE. Neither AE+RE nor RE showed altered mRNA-levels. Citrate Synthase activity increased (P < 0.05) after AE+RE. The results suggest that the increased aerobic capacity shown with AE+RE, was accompanied by a more robust increase in muscle size compared with RE. While this response was not carried over to greater improvement in muscle function, it remains that intense AE can be executed prior to RE without compromising performance outcome.

Keywords
Endurance; Gene expression; Muscle cross-sectional area; Muscle power and strength
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-17710 (URN)10.1152/japplphysiol.01013.2012 (DOI)000313051000011 ()2-s2.0-84871782994 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2012-12-13 Created: 2012-12-13 Last updated: 2017-06-28Bibliographically approved
Tesch, P., Pozzo, M., Ainegren, M., Swarén, M. & Linnehan, R. M. (2013). Cardiovascular responses to rowing on a novel ergometer designed for both resistance and aerobic training in space. Aviation, Space and Environmental Medicine, 84(5), 516-521
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cardiovascular responses to rowing on a novel ergometer designed for both resistance and aerobic training in space
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2013 (English)In: Aviation, Space and Environmental Medicine, ISSN 0095-6562, E-ISSN 1943-4448, Vol. 84, no 5, p. 516-521Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Astronauts are required to perform both resistance and aerobic exercise while in orbit. This study assessed the aerobic energy yield and related physiological measurements using a nongravity dependent flywheel device designed for both resistance and aerobic exercise (RAD) in space. Methods: Eight physically active men and women performed all-out rowing on the RAD. For comparison, exercise was also carried out employing a commercially available rowing ergometer (C2). Results: Peak oxygen uptake during exercise using RAD and C2 averaged 3.11 ± 0.49 and 3.18 ± 0.50 L · min-1 respectively. Similarly, peak plasma lactate concentration (9.6 vs. 11.2 mmol · L-1), heart rate (183 vs. 184 bpm), and rate of perceived exertion (15.8 vs. 16.0) were comparable across exercise using the two devices. Discussion: Collectively, the results suggest that this novel exercise modality offers cardiovascular and metabolic responses, and thus aerobic exercise stimulus that is equally effective as that evoked by established technology for indoor rowing. Given the need for physiologically sound and highly effective exercise countermeasures that features small mass and envelope, and allows for resistance and aerobic exercise in a single apparatus, we believe this novel hardware should be considered for use in space. © by the Aerospace Medical Association, Alexandria, VA.

Keywords
Aerobic power, Astronaut health and fitness, Cardiovascular deconditioning
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-19365 (URN)10.3357/ASEM.3552.2013 (DOI)000332996000009 ()2-s2.0-84878617273 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2013-08-26 Created: 2013-06-19 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
Fernandez-Gonzalo, R., Lundberg, T. R. & Tesch, P. A. (2013). Gene Expression After Acute Resistance Exercise is Modified by Aerobic Exercise and Chronic Training. Paper presented at 60th Annual Meeting of the American-College-of-Sports-Medicine, MAY 28-JUN 01, 2013, Indianapolis, IN. Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 45(5), 528-528
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Gene Expression After Acute Resistance Exercise is Modified by Aerobic Exercise and Chronic Training
2013 (English)In: Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, ISSN 0195-9131, E-ISSN 1530-0315, Vol. 45, no 5, p. 528-528Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Other academic) Published
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-21997 (URN)000330469704166 ()
Conference
60th Annual Meeting of the American-College-of-Sports-Medicine, MAY 28-JUN 01, 2013, Indianapolis, IN
Available from: 2014-06-04 Created: 2014-05-28 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
Trappe, S., Hayes, A., Galpin, L., Kaminsky, L., Jemiolo, B., Fink, W., . . . Tesch, P. (2013). New Records In Aerobic Power Among Octogenarian Lifelong Endurance Athletes. Journal of applied physiology, 114(1), 3-10
Open this publication in new window or tab >>New Records In Aerobic Power Among Octogenarian Lifelong Endurance Athletes
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2013 (English)In: Journal of applied physiology, ISSN 8750-7587, E-ISSN 1522-1601, Vol. 114, no 1, p. 3-10Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

New records in aerobic power among octogenarian lifelong endurance athletes. J Appl Physiol 114: 3-10, 2013. First published October 11, 2012; doi:10.1152/japplphysiol.01107.2012.-We examined whole body aerobic capacity and myocellular markers of oxidative metabolism in lifelong endurance athletes [n = 9, 81 ± 1 yr, 68 ± 3 kg, body mass index (BMI) = 23 ± 1 kg/m2] and age-matched, healthy, untrained men (n = 6; 82 ± 1 y, 77 ± 5 kg, BMI = 26 ± 1 kg/m2). The endurance athletes were cross-country skiers, including a former Olympic champion and several national/regional champions, with a history of aerobic exercise and participation in endurance events throughout their lives. Each subject performed a maximal cycle test to assess aerobic capacity (VO2max). Subjects had a resting vastus lateralis muscle biopsy to assess oxidative enzymes (citrate synthase and βHAD) and molecular (mRNA) targets associated with mitochondrial biogenesis [peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator 1α (PGC-1α) and mitochondrial transcription factor A (Tfam)]. The octogenarian athletes had a higher (P < 0.05) absolute (2.6 ± 0.1 vs. 1.6 ± 0.1 l/min) and relative (38 ± 1 vs. 21 ± 1 ml·kg-1·min-1) VO2max, ventilation (79 ± 3 vs. 64 ± 7 l/min), heart rate (160 ± 5 vs. 146 ± 8 beats per minute), and final workload (182 ± 4 vs. 131 ± 14 W). Skeletal muscle oxidative enzymes were 54% (citrate synthase) and 42% (βHAD) higher (P < 0.05) in the octogenarian athletes. Likewise, basal PGC-1α and Tfam mRNA were 135% and 80% greater (P < 0.05) in the octogenarian athletes. To our knowledge, the VO2max of the lifelong endurance athletes is the highest recorded in humans >80 yr of age and comparable to nonendurance trained men 40 years younger. The superior cardiovascular and skeletal muscle health profile of the octogenarian athletes provides a large functional reserve above the aerobic frailty threshold and is associated with lower risk for disability and mortality. © 2013 the American Physiological Society.

Keywords
Aging; Exercise; Heart rate; Oxygen consumption; Skeletal muscle
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-17813 (URN)10.1152/japplphysiol.01107.2012 (DOI)000313051000002 ()2-s2.0-84871752629 (Scopus ID)
Note

Published online before print October 11, 2012

Available from: 2012-12-17 Created: 2012-12-17 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
Lundberg, T. R., Fernandez-Gonzalo, R., Rodriguez-Miguelez, P. & Tesch, P. A. (2013). Relationship Between Acute Myostatin Expression, p70S6K Phosphorylation and Muscle Adaptations to Aerobic and Resistance Training. Paper presented at 60th Annual Meeting of the American-College-of-Sports-Medicine, MAY 28-JUN 01, 2013, Indianapolis, IN. Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 45(5), 528-528
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Relationship Between Acute Myostatin Expression, p70S6K Phosphorylation and Muscle Adaptations to Aerobic and Resistance Training
2013 (English)In: Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, ISSN 0195-9131, E-ISSN 1530-0315, Vol. 45, no 5, p. 528-528Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Other academic) Published
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-22008 (URN)000330469704167 ()
Conference
60th Annual Meeting of the American-College-of-Sports-Medicine, MAY 28-JUN 01, 2013, Indianapolis, IN
Available from: 2014-06-03 Created: 2014-05-28 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
Lundberg, T. R., Fernandez-Gonzalo, R., Gustafsson, T. & Tesch, P. A. (2012). Aerobic Exercise Alters Skeletal Muscle Molecular Responses to Resistance Exercise. Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 44(9), 1680-1688
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Aerobic Exercise Alters Skeletal Muscle Molecular Responses to Resistance Exercise
2012 (English)In: Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, ISSN 0195-9131, E-ISSN 1530-0315, Vol. 44, no 9, p. 1680-1688Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

LUNDBERG, T. R., R. FERNANDEZ-GONZALO, T. GUSTAFSSON, and P. A. TESCH. Aerobic Exercise Alters Skeletal Muscle Molecular Responses to Resistance Exercise. Med. Sci. Sports Exerc., Vol. 44, No. 9, pp. 1680-1688, 2012. Purpose: This study assessed the influence of an acute aerobic exercise bout on molecular responses to subsequent resistance exercise (RE). Methods: Nine physically active men performed a 45-min one-legged cycle ergometry exercise and 4 x 7 maximal concentric eccentric knee extensions for each leg 6 h later. Thus, one limb was subjected to aerobic and resistance exercise (AE+RE), and the contralateral limb to resistance exercise (RE) only. Knee extensor peak power was determined. Biopsies were obtained from the m vastus lateralis before (PRE) and 15 mm (POST1) and 3 h after RE. Analysis determined glycogen content, mRNA levels (vascular endothelial growth factor, peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-gamma coactivator-1, muscle RING-finger protein-1, atrogin-1, myostatin), and phosphorylated proteins (mammalian target of rapamycin, p70S6 kinase, ribosomal protein S6, eukaryotic elongation factor 2). Results: Peak power was similar in AE + RE and RE. After RE, the time course of glycogen utilization and protein signaling was similar across legs. However, phosphorylation of mammalian target of rapamycin and p70S6 kinase was elevated in AE + RE versus RE (main effect, P < 0.05). Vascular endothelial growth factor and peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-gamma coactivator-1 were higher in AE + RE than in RE at PRE and POST1 (P < 0.05). Myostatin was lower in AE + RE versus RE at PRE and POST1 (P < 0.05) and downregulated after resistance exercise only. Atrogin-1 was higher in AE + RE than in RE at PRE and POST1 (P < 0.05) and decreased after RE in AE + RE. Muscle RING-finger protein-1 was similar across legs. No difference for any marker was evident 3 h after RE. Conclusions: These results suggest that acute aerobic exercise alters molecular events regulating muscle protein turnover during the early recovery period from subsequent RE.

Keywords
ENDURANCE, HUMAN SKELETAL MUSCLE, mTOR, MUSCLE POWER, PGC-1 alpha, P70S6K
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-17251 (URN)10.1249/MSS.0b013e318256fbe8 (DOI)000307624600008 ()2-s2.0-84865529379 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2012-10-29 Created: 2012-10-27 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved
Cotter, J. A., Hoang, T., Yu, A., Tesch, P., Caiozzo, V. J. & Adams, G. R. (2012). Counteracting Decrements in Muscle Function and Aerobic Capacity During Unloading Utilizing a Gravity Independent Device. Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 44(Suppl 2), 110-110
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Counteracting Decrements in Muscle Function and Aerobic Capacity During Unloading Utilizing a Gravity Independent Device
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2012 (English)In: Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, ISSN 0195-9131, E-ISSN 1530-0315, Vol. 44, no Suppl 2, p. 110-110Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Other academic) Published
National Category
Physiology Sport and Fitness Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-18294 (URN)000310363300086 ()
Available from: 2013-01-16 Created: 2013-01-16 Last updated: 2018-01-11Bibliographically approved
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