miun.sePublications
Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
BETA
Svedlund, Marianne
Publications (10 of 31) Show all publications
Junehag, L., Hochwälder, J. & Svedlund, M. (2016). Being a peer mentor for a person recovering from an acute myocardial infarction. Journal of Nursing Education and Practice, 6(5), 41-48
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Being a peer mentor for a person recovering from an acute myocardial infarction
2016 (English)In: Journal of Nursing Education and Practice, ISSN 1925-4040, E-ISSN 1925-4059, Vol. 6, no 5, p. 41-48Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Challenge after an acute myocardial infarction (AMI) is to manage the disease and to prevent a second AMI. Other people with the same illness have a unique understanding of the situation; therefore, they can provide valuable support. Being a peer mentor and contributing one’s own experiences of the same illness can even lead to increased self-confidence. The aim was to describe personal perceptions of being a peer mentor for a person recovering from an AMI. Patients in three sparsely populated counties, who had experienced their first AMI the previous year, were offered contact with peer mentors. The peer mentors had experienced an AMI between one and ten years ago. Sixteen of them were interviewed after one year as mentor. The interview texts were analysed using qualitative content analysis. Two themes summarized the interview results, “being in charge” and “being comfortable”, which incorporated six subthemes. The peer mentors also answered a questionnaire, and according to the purpose of the study, certain parts of the questionnaires were analysed using a paired-sample t-test. The dimensions measured in the Revised Illness Perception Questionnaire (IPQ-R) showed significant increased mean values, including Illness Coherence (p ≤ .001) and Emotional representation (p ≤ .05). Highlights of the results included that being a peer mentor led to feelings of pride and that peer mentors should be preceded by a careful matching between patients and mentors.

Keywords
Intervention, mixed design, IPQ-R, rural areas, SF-36
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-23303 (URN)10.5430/jnep.v6n5p41 (DOI)
Projects
Doktorsavhandling
Available from: 2014-10-29 Created: 2014-10-29 Last updated: 2017-08-09Bibliographically approved
Ek, B. & Svedlund, M. (2015). Registered nurses’ experiences of their decision-making at an Emergency Medical Dispatch Centre. Journal of Clinical Nursing, 24(7-8), 1122-1131
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Registered nurses’ experiences of their decision-making at an Emergency Medical Dispatch Centre
2015 (English)In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 24, no 7-8, p. 1122-1131Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aims and objectives: To describe registered nurses experiences at an Emergency Medical Dispatch Centre.

Background: It is important that ambulances are urgently directed to patients who are in need of immediate help and of quick transportation to a hospital. Because resources are limited, Emergency Medical Dispatch centres cannot send ambulances with high priority to all callers. The efficiency of the system is therefore dependent on triage. Nurses worldwide are involved in patient triage, both before the patients arrival to the hospital and in the subsequent emergency care. Ambulance dispatching is traditionally a duty for operators at Emergency Medical Dispatch centres, and in Sweden this duty has become increasingly performed by registered nurses.

Design: A qualitative design was used for this study.

Methods: Fifteen registered nurses with experience at Emergency Medical Dispatch centres were interviewed. The participants were asked to describe the content of their work and their experiences. They also described the most challenging and difficult situations according to the critical incidence technique. Content analysis was used.

Results: Two themes emerged during the analysis: ‘Having a profession with opportunities and obstacles’ and ‘Meeting serious and difficult situations’, with eight sub-themes. The results showed that the decisions to dispatch ambulances were both challenging and difficult. Difficulties included conveying medical advice without seeing the patient, teaching cardio-pulmonary resuscitation via telephone and dealing with intoxicated and aggressive callers. Conflicts with colleagues and ambulance crews as well as fear of making wrong decisions were also mentioned.

Conclusions: Work at Emergency Medical Dispatch centres is a demanding but stimulating duty for registered nurses.

Relevance to clinical practice: Great benefits can be achieved using experienced triage nurses, including increased patient safety and better use of medical resources. Improved internal support systems at Emergency Medical Dispatch centres and striving for a blame-free culture are important factors to attract and retain employees.

Keywords
ambulance, content analysis, decision-making, emergency, priority, triage
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-24878 (URN)10.1111/jocn.12701 (DOI)000351633800023 ()2-s2.0-84925332575 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2015-04-23 Created: 2015-04-23 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
Junehag, L., Asplund, K. & Svedlund, M. (2014). A qualitative study: Perceptions of the psychosocial consequences and access to support after an acute myocardial infarction. Intensive & Critical Care Nursing, 30(1), 22-30
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A qualitative study: Perceptions of the psychosocial consequences and access to support after an acute myocardial infarction
2014 (English)In: Intensive & Critical Care Nursing, ISSN 0964-3397, E-ISSN 1532-4036, Vol. 30, no 1, p. 22-30Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives: The aim of this study was to describe individuals' perceptions of the psychosocial consequences of an acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and of their access to support one year after the event. Methods: The study included 20 participants (14 men and six women) who lived in rural areas and had experienced their first AMI. Eleven were offered contact with a mentor. The participants were interviewed one year after their AMI. Results: The findings are presented in three themes: having a different life, having to manage the situation and having access to support, with 11 subthemes. During their recovery, the participants experienced psychosocial consequences, consisting of anxiety and the fear of being afflicted again. Most mentees appreciated their mentor and some of those without mentors wished they had received organised support. Participants were often more dissatisfied than satisfied with the follow-up provided during recovery. Conclusions: After an AMI, follow-up is important during recovery, but the standardised information provided is inadequate. During recovery, people need help dealing with existential crises. After discharge, receiving peer support from lay people with similar experiences could be valuable. The knowledge gleaned from this study could be used in education at coronary care units and in health care outside the hospital setting. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.

Keywords
Emotional distress, Existential crises, Mentor, Peer support, Qualitative content analysis
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Nursing Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-20993 (URN)10.1016/j.iccn.2013.07.002 (DOI)000349929400004 ()2-s2.0-84888428249 (Scopus ID)
Note

Source: Scopus

Available from: 2014-01-14 Created: 2014-01-09 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
Junehag, L., Asplund, K. & Svedlund, M. (2014). Perceptions of illness, lifestyle and support after an acute myocardial infarction. Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, 28(2), 289-296
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Perceptions of illness, lifestyle and support after an acute myocardial infarction
2014 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 28, no 2, p. 289-296Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

After an acute myocardial infarction (AMI), people are encouraged to adopt a healthy lifestyle. But they are not always motivated to maintain the necessary lifestyle changes and need the right support to do it. In sparsely populated areas, people afflicted by an AMI have difficulty in finding standard rehabilitation programmes near their homes during the recovery, so they need alternative forms of support. The aim was to describe individual perceptions of their lifestyle and support, 1year after an AMI, with or without mentorship. This study has a qualitative, descriptive design with data collected in individual interviews. Twenty men and women were interviewed 1year after their first AMI, and 11 had been offered contact with mentors who had had an AMI. Content analysis was used to analyse the data. Those with and without mentors had similarities and tendencies to variation in their perceptions, with both a positive and negative view of life. The participants were aware of the necessity of living a healthy lifestyle but some resisted doing so. They wished to live as before, and all saw the future positively. Having a mentor with the same experience could be valuable for some people, but more research is needed to understand the lack of motivation to make beneficial lifestyle changes after a serious health event as AMI.

Keywords
rural areas, lifestyle changes, body limits, recovery, mentor, qualitative research
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-22004 (URN)10.1111/scs.12058 (DOI)000334503400010 ()2-s2.0-84898866468 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2014-06-04 Created: 2014-05-28 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
Björkman Randström, K., Wengler, Y., Asplund, K. & Svedlund, M. (2014). Working with 'hands-off' support: a qualitative study of multidisciplinary teams' experiences of home rehabilitation for older people. International Journal of Older People Nursing, 9(1), 25-33
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Working with 'hands-off' support: a qualitative study of multidisciplinary teams' experiences of home rehabilitation for older people
2014 (English)In: International Journal of Older People Nursing, ISSN 1748-3735, E-ISSN 1748-3743, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 25-33Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background

There is a move towards the provision of rehabilitation for older people in their homes. It is essential to ensure that rehabilitation services promote independence of older people.

Aim

The aim of the study was to explore multidisciplinary teams' experiences of home rehabilitation for older people.

Methods

Five focus groups were conducted with multidisciplinary teams based in a municipality in Sweden, covering seven different professions. In total, 28 participants volunteered to participate in these interviews. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and analysed according to content analysis.

Results

Two main categories, as well as four subcategories, emerged. The first main category, having a rehabilitative approach in everyday life, consisted of the subcategories: ‘giving ‘hands-off’ support’ and ‘being in a home environment’. The second main category, working across professional boundaries, consisted of the subcategories: ‘coordinating resources’ and ‘learning from each other’.

Conclusion

Common goals, communication skills and role understanding contributed to facilitating the teams' performances of rehabilitation. A potential benefit of home rehabilitation, because the older person is in a familiar environment, is to work a rehabilitative approach into each individual's activity in their everyday life in order to meet their specific needs. At an organisational level, there is a need for developing services to further support older people's psychosocial needs during rehabilitation.

Implications for practice

Team performance towards an individual's rehabilitation should come from an emerged whole and not only from the performance of a specific professional approach depending on the traditional role of each profession. A rehabilitative approach is based on ‘hands-off’ support in order to incorporate an individual's everyday activities as a part of their rehabilitation.

Keywords
Focus group, Home rehabilitation, Multidisciplinary team, Municipality, Older people
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-17698 (URN)10.1111/opn.12013 (DOI)2-s2.0-84894484062 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2012-12-12 Created: 2012-12-12 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved
Björkman Randström, K., Asplund, K., Svedlund, M. & Paulson, M. (2013). Activity and participation in home rehabilitation: Older people's and family members perspectives. Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, 45(2), 211-216
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Activity and participation in home rehabilitation: Older people's and family members perspectives
2013 (English)In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081, Vol. 45, no 2, p. 211-216Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: To explore the experiences of older people and their supporting family members in relation to home rehabilitation, with a focus on activity and participation. Methods: Qualitative interviews were carried out with 6 older people and 6 family members at 1 and 6 months after the older person’s discharge to their home. Qualitative content analysis of the data was carried out. The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health provides a guiding framework for rehabilitation. Results: Informants’ experiences of home rehabilitation contributed to the formation of 6 categories: (i) living with a frail body; (ii) striving for well-being in daily life; (iii) being close at hand; (iv) feeling dependent in daily life; (v) struggling to carry on; and (vi) striving to be at home. Conclusion: Older people’s goals were to return to daily routines and to perform meaningful activities without feeling dependent on other people. Family members’ participation was crucial. Psychosocial support and autonomy were essential for facilitating activity and participation. Healthcare professionals should consider each individual’s unique experiences along with the significance of being at home.

Keywords
rehabilitation, older people, family member, interviews, qualitative research
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-17697 (URN)10.2340/16501977-1085 (DOI)000315179700017 ()2-s2.0-84875984561 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2012-12-12 Created: 2012-12-12 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved
Eriksson, M., Asplund, K., Hochwälder, J. & Svedlund, M. (2013). Changes in hope and health-related quality of life in couples following acute myocardial infarction: A quantitative longitudinal study. Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, 27(2), 295-302
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Changes in hope and health-related quality of life in couples following acute myocardial infarction: A quantitative longitudinal study
2013 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 27, no 2, p. 295-302Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background:  Acute myocardial infarction (AMI) is a life-changing event that affects both the patient and the family and can have an influence on hope as well as HRQoL during the recovery period.

Aims:  To compare self-rated scores of hope and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) 1, 7, 13 and 25 months, after an AMI with regard to (i) differences across time, and (ii) differences between patients and their partners.

Design:  Explorative and longitudinal study.

Methods:  In this nonrandomized study, Short Form 36 Health Questionnaire (SF-36) and Herth Hope Index-Swedish (HHI-S) questionnaires were completed by thirteen post-AMI patients and their partners. Data were collected on four occasions.

Results:  In general, hope as well as HRQoL scores increased over time. A 2 (groups) × 4 (times) anova for mixed design showed significant changes in mental as well as in physical health over time but no significant effect of group on mental or physical health. Calculation of the minimum detectable change (MDC-index) for HHI-S and SF-36 revealed that scores between data collection points were not stable.

Conclusion:  Our results show that although hope and HRQoL scores increased, only a few of the changes were statistically significant. Neither HHI-S nor SF-36 seems to measure stable states. Changes in hope and HRQoL levels may be due to participants striving to adapt to the current situation.

Relevance to clinical practice:  These results can be used in the training of nursing staff to enhance their understanding of the significance of a family-centred approach after an AMI.

Keywords
Acute myocardial infarction, Health Related Quality of Life, Hope, Minimum Detectable Change, Nursing
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-12057 (URN)10.1111/j.1471-6712.2012.01032.x (DOI)000318815700012 ()2-s2.0-84877831127 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2010-09-29 Created: 2010-09-29 Last updated: 2017-12-12Bibliographically approved
Björkman Randström, K., Asplund, K. & Svedlund, M. (2013). "I have to be patient" - A longitudinal case study of an older man's rehabilitation experience after a hip replacement surgery. Journal of Nursing Education and Practice, 3(8), 160-169
Open this publication in new window or tab >>"I have to be patient" - A longitudinal case study of an older man's rehabilitation experience after a hip replacement surgery
2013 (English)In: Journal of Nursing Education and Practice, ISSN 1925-4040, E-ISSN 1925-4059, Vol. 3, no 8, p. 160-169Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Aging can bring about an increased risk of disability. Following illness or injures, rehabilitation is essentialif the individual affected is to attain and maintain independence. Performing rehabilitation with a person-centeredapproach is vital for positive outcomes. Health providers are increasingly interested in developing rehabilitation servicesin outpatient settings for older people in their own homes. Aim: The aim of this study was to describe an older man’s rehabilitation experience after a hip replacement surgery.Design: A longitudinal qualitative descriptive single case study.Methods: Interviews were conducted on four occasions with the participant in his own home. The interviews wereconducted one month, seven months, one year, and five years after the patient was discharged from the hospital. The datawere analyzed using qualitative content analysis.Results: Three categories emerged: (i) having feelings of despair, (ii) being in charge, and (iii) having rehabilitative support. The results demonstrate the participant’s decreased ability to walk after a complicated hip surgery, and his physical and psychological struggle for well-being in everyday life. A strong motivation to return to as normal a life aspossible facilitated the rehabilitation. Also, a supportive family and accessible health care professionals were essential tothe positive outcome of the home rehabilitation.Conclusion: Rehabilitation can extend over a long period to maintain and improve mobility. Also, living with a disability causes feelings of despair. The home can be a source of energy but also a place of challenges during rehabilitation. To support older people in achieving their rehabilitation goals and engaging in meaningful activities, professionals should focus on personal factors, psychosocial support and on influential factors in the home environment and in society in general.

Keywords
Older people, rehabilitation, case study, home
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-18795 (URN)10.5430/jnep.v3n8p160 (DOI)
Available from: 2013-04-24 Created: 2013-04-23 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
Ek, B., Edström, P., Toutin, A. & Svedlund, M. (2013). Reliability of a Swedish pre-hospital dispatch system in prioritizing patients. International Emergency Nursing, 21(2), 143-149
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Reliability of a Swedish pre-hospital dispatch system in prioritizing patients
2013 (English)In: International Emergency Nursing, ISSN 1755-599X, E-ISSN 1878-013X, Vol. 21, no 2, p. 143-149Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The need of emergency help often begins with a call to a dispatch center. The operator uses a medical index to prioritize dispatches. Since the resources of ambulances are limited, it is important that the priority grading decided by the operator at the dispatch center is as adequate as possible. In the county of Jamtland in Sweden, a system for triage named METTS-A (Medical Emergency Triage and Treatment System-A) has been in use since 2009, when the patient is coded according to priority level. The aim of this study was to analyse the sensitivity and specificity of the priority grading made by the dispatch center in comparison with the METTS-A priority assessed by the ambulance nurse. Statistics from a data-base in northern Sweden were analyzed. The material covered every ambulance that was dispatched, 6986 times during the period of data collecting. The results show a high sensitivity but low specificity in the dispatch system. The results also indicate that over prioritization exists since most of the patients with a high acute need of an ambulance are correctly identified, while many patients without that need are also given a high priority ambulance service. Therefore the conclusions were that both over- and under prioritizations were made. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Keywords
Ambulance calls, Emergency care, Pre-hospital
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-15755 (URN)10.1016/j.ienj.2011.11.006 (DOI)000319032400011 ()2-s2.0-84876789260 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2012-01-20 Created: 2012-01-20 Last updated: 2017-12-08Bibliographically approved
Björkman Randström, K., Asplund, K. & Svedlund, M. (2012). Impact of environmental factors in home rehabilitation − a qualitative study from the perspective of older persons using the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health to describe facilitators and barriers. Disability and Rehabilitation, 34(9), 779-787
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Impact of environmental factors in home rehabilitation − a qualitative study from the perspective of older persons using the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health to describe facilitators and barriers
2012 (English)In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 34, no 9, p. 779-787Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: The aim of this study was to explore older people’s experience of environmental factors that impact on their activity and participation in home rehabilitation. Method: Older people aged between 68 and 93 years and receiving home rehabilitation were interviewed. A qualitative content analysis was performed on the interview text using the predetermined structure of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) environmental domain. The text was linked to the closest ICF category. Results: The results identified environmental facilitators and barriers that influenced activity and participation among older people receiving home rehabilitation. Approaches that provided a facilitative environment were access to assistive products and technologies, alterations to the physical environment, social support and relationships, and adjusted health and social care services. Conclusions: A qualitative study using ICF-listed environmental factors contributed a holistic view of facilitators and barriers in home rehabilitation for older people. Awareness of the importance of the impact of the social environment on activities and participation could improve home rehabilitation services for older people. The study represents an important step towards a holistic approach using the ICF, which aims to enable all health care professionals to describe, plan and evaluate rehabilitation services together with older people across the health and social care sectors.

Keywords
Activity, environment, home rehabilitation, ICF, multidisciplinary team, participation
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-16139 (URN)10.3109/09638288.2011.619621 (DOI)000301587200011 ()22004413 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84858412563 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2012-04-26 Created: 2012-04-26 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved
Organisations

Search in DiVA

Show all publications